Some real Shock and Awe: Racially profiled and cuffed in Detroit

Silly me. I thought flying on 9/11 would be easy. I figured most people would choose not to fly that day so lines would be short, planes would be lightly filled and though security might be ratcheted up, we’d all feel safer knowing we had come a long way since that dreadful Tuesday morning 10 years ago.

But then armed officers stormed my plane, threw me in handcuffs and locked me up.

My flight from Denver landed in Detroit on time. I sent a text message to my husband to let him know we had landed and I would be home by dinner. The plane stopped on the tarmac, seemingly waiting to have the gate cleared. We waited. I played on my phone, checking Facebook, scrolling through my Twitter feed. After a while of sitting there, I decided to call my husband to tell him the plane was being delayed and I would call him when I got off the plane.

Just as I hung up the phone, the captain came over the loudspeaker and announced that the airport authorities wanted to move the airplane to a different part of the airport. Must be a blocked gate or something, I thought. But then he said: Everyone remain in your seats or there will be consequences. Sounded serious. I looked out the window and saw a squadron of police cars following the plane, lights flashing. I turned to my neighbor, who happened to be an Indian man, in wonderment. What is going on? Others on the plane were remarking at the police as well. Getting a little uneasy, I decided the best thing for me to do was to tweet about the experience. If the plane was going to blow up, at least there’d be some record on my part.

Stuck on a plane at Detroit airport…cops everywhere

Soon the plane was stopping in some remote part of the airport, far from any buildings, and out the window I see more police cars coming to surround the plane. Maybe there’s a fugitive on the plane, I say to my neighbor, who is also texting and now shooting some photos of the scene outside. He asks me to take a few, as I have a better angle from my window seat. A few dozen uniformed and plainclothes officers are huddled off the side of the plane. I don’t see any guns, and it isn’t clear what’s going on.

So I continued to tweet:

A little concerned about this situation. Plane moved away from terminal surrounded by cops. Crew is mum. Passengers can’t get up.

Then what looked like the bomb squad pulled up. Two police vans and a police communication center bus parked off the road. I started to get nervous and rethink my decision to fly on 9/11.

Cops in uniform and plainclothes in a huddle in rear of plane.

We had been waiting on the plane for a half hour. I had to pee. I wanted to get home and see my family. And I wanted someone to tell us what was going on. In the distance, a van with stairs came closer. I sighed with relief, thinking we were going to get off the plane and get shuttled back to the terminal. I would still be able to make it home for dinner. Others on the plane also seemed happy to see those stairs coming our way.

I see stairs coming our way…yay!

Before I knew it, about 10 cops, some in what looked like military fatigues, were running toward the plane carrying the biggest machine guns I have ever seen–bigger than what the guards carry at French train stations.

My last tweet:

Majorly armed cops coming aboard

Someone shouted for us to place our hands on the seats in front of us, heads down. The cops ran down the aisle, stopped at my row and yelled at the three of us to get up. “Can I bring my phone?” I asked, of course. What a cliffhanger for my Twitter followers! No, one of the cops said, grabbing my arm a little harder than I would have liked. He slapped metal cuffs on my wrists and pushed me off the plane. The three of us, two Indian men living in the Detroit metro area, and me, a half-Arab, half-Jewish housewife living in suburban Ohio, were being detained.

The cops brought us to a parked squad car next to the plane, had us spread  our legs and arms. Mine asked me if I was wearing any explosives. “No,” I said, holding my tongue to not let out a snarky response. I wasn’t sure what I could and could not say, and all that came out was “What’s going on?”

No one would answer me. They  put me in the back of the car. It’s a plastic seat, for all you out there who have never been tossed into the back of a police car. It’s hard, it’s hot, and it’s humiliating. The Indian man who had sat next to me on the plane was already in the backseat. I turned to him, shocked, and asked him if he knew what was going on. I asked him if he knew the other man that had been in our row, and he said he had just met him. I said, it’s because of what we look like. They’re doing this because of what we look like. And I couldn’t believe that I was being arrested and taken away.

When the Patriot Act was passed after 9/11 and Arabs and Arab-looking people were being harassed all over the country, my Saudi Arabian dad became nervous. A bit of a conspiracy theorist at heart, he knew the government was watching him and at any time could come and take him away. It was happening all over. Men were being taken on suspicion of terrorist activities and held and questioned–sometimes abused–for long periods of time. Our country had a civil rights issue on its hands. And, in the name of patriotism we lost a lot of our liberty, especially those who look like me.

I never had any run-ins with the law. Since 9/11, though I felt a heightened sense of how my appearance would affect my travel plans, I never had any concrete reason to think I would be targeted. I passed through security without excessive searching (except that one time they thought they saw a pocket knife in my husband’s backpack, which they couldn’t find anyway even though it was there). Because I am my father’s daughter I am aware of the possibility of anti-Arab and anti-Semitic sentiments that have increased dramatically, but luckily  no members of my family nor myself have had to endure what so many others have gone through in this country and throughout the world. As Americans we are scared and horrified by acts of terror. But I am not sure that what we are doing to dissuade and protect are working.

We arrived at an offsite building and remained in the squad car for a few minutes. The Indian man was taken out of the car first, and an officer stood at the door to make sure I didn’t go anywhere. I asked him several times what was going on and he wouldn’t answer me. It was like I was invisible. I felt so helpless and shocked. I was being treated like a criminal.

Then it was my turn. I got out of the car and was led, still cuffed, to a cell. “Are you serious?” I asked the officer, and he said yes. The heavy metal door was shut and locked behind me. Again, I asked what was going on and why was I here. Finally he said, they will let you know later. They are going to ask you some questions.

I sat down on the metal cot that hung off the wall. It had a thin, green vinyl mattress–mattress is a generous term–that offered no comfort. It was about a 6-by-10 cell, the concrete walls were painted a light yellow but were streaked with black dirt. The floor was some sort of stainless steel, and a stainless steel toilet that has probably never seen the good side of a scrubbing brush, instructed me to keep holding my stretched bladder as long as I could. Near the ceiling above the toilet there was a video camera.

A plainclothes officer stood came to my door and asked me if I spoke English. Something in me snapped at that question. Of course I spoke English I’m an American citizen, you asshole! Well, I left the expletive out. “Ok,” he said and stood watch outside my door saying he wanted to make sure I didn’t “flush anything.” He also wouldn’t tell me what was going on.

As I sat and waited, quietly contemplating my situation, the other Indian man was getting questioned in the main room outside. I couldn’t see what was going on, but I could hear a bit. They asked him where he was from, did he have any family, where were his shoes. He talked quietly and agreeably. I wondered if he was as incensed as I was or if he had entered this country expecting harassment from the American authorities.

They took him to another room, and I heard an officer tell him to remove his clothes. He was going to be searched. I could not fully grasp what was happening. I stared at the yellow walls and listened to a few officers talk about the overtime they were racking up, and I decided that I hated country music. I hated speedboats and shitty beer in coozies and fat bellies and rednecks. I thought about Abu Ghraib and the horror to which those prisoners were exposed. I thought about my dad and his prescience.  I was glad he wasn’t alive to know about what was happening to me. I thought about my kids, and what would have happened if they had been there when I got taken away. I contemplated never flying again. I thought about the incredible waste of taxpayer dollars in conducting an operation like this. I wondered what my rights were, if I had any at all. Mostly, I could not believe I was sitting in some jail cell in some cold, undisclosed building surrounded by “the authorities.”

I heard the officers discuss my impending strip search. They needed to bring in a female officer. At least they were following protocol, or something to that nature. Still, could this really be happening?

Eventually a female uniformed officer came in. She looked like a fat Jada Pinkett Smith, and in a kind but firm voice explained what was going to happen. I was to stand, face the wall in a position so the camera above the toilet couldn’t see, and take off my clothes. I complied. She commented on my tattoo, saying, “Oh you have one of those things–good and evil, right?”

“Yin and yang. Balance,” I said, grabbing my clothes to redress.

“You understand why we have to do this, right? It’s for our own protection,” she told me.

Because I am so violent. And pulling me off an airplane, handcuffing me and patting me down against a squad car didn’t offer enough protection. They also needed to make sure all my orifices were free and clear.

She apologized for having to do the strip search, and I asked her to tell me what was going on. She said she didn’t know but someone would come and talk to me. She put my handcuffs back on and left. The other officer stood guard outside. I told him I needed to call my husband. He said I could use the phone later.

As I sat in my cell trying not to think about my full bladder, they brought another man in. I wondered if he had been on the plane as well. Were they going to bring everyone in or had they just singled us out? He spoke belligerently, and I couldn’t understand much of what he was saying. But I did hear two officers talking about the man who stole a $3,000 watch at the security checkpoint. Now there’s a real crime. What was I doing here?

I had no idea how much time had passed. It was about 4:00 when I sent my last tweet on the plane. I couldn’t tell if it was day or night. I was tired, confused, angry and bored. I wanted my phone. I wanted to call my husband so he could come to Detroit and rescue me. I wanted to update my status so my friends weren’t freaking out. Did I also want a lawyer?

Another female officer, this one in jeans and a t-shirt came to visit me. She introduced herself as an agent–Homeland Security. She removed my handcuffs and had me follow her to a different room down a long hall and through a few doors. As we walked, I got a glimpse of the watch-stealer, a chubby middle-aged white guy with a buzz cut. He didn’t look too different from some of the officers.

She led me to a small, white room where a man who introduced himself as an FBI agent was waiting for me. I sat on one of three chairs at a small metal table, and the female agent sat across from me. They both offered me their badges for inspection, not that I would have known the difference, but they were calm and not pushy. I appreciated that. The male agent proceeded to ask me a series of questions about where I had been, where I was going, about my family, if I had noticed any suspicious behavior on the plane. The other agent took notes while I talked. They asked if I knew the two men sitting next to me, and if I noticed them getting up during the flight or doing anything I would consider suspicious.

I told them no, and couldn’t remember how many times the men had gotten up, though I was sure they had both gone to the bathroom in succession at some point during the flight.

They had done some background check on me already because they knew I had been to Venezuela in 2001. They asked about my brother and sister and asked about my foreign travel. They asked what I did during the flight. I told them I didn’t get up at all, read, slept and played on my phone (in airplane mode, don’t worry). They asked about my education and wanted my address, Social Security, phone number, Facebook, Twitter, pretty much my whole life story.

Again, I asked what was going on, and the man said judging from their line of questioning that I could probably guess, but that someone on the plane had reported that the three of us in row 12 were conducting suspicious activity. What is the likelihood that two Indian men who didn’t know each other and a dark-skinned woman of Arab/Jewish heritage would be on the same flight from Denver to Detroit? Was that suspicion enough? Even considering that we didn’t say a word to each other until it became clear there were cops following our plane? Perhaps it was two Indian man going to the bathroom in succession?

He warned me that the last time an incident like this happened back in December, they had to interview everyone on the plane and no one got to go home for six hours. It was going to be a long haul.

They asked me if I wanted to add anything that they hadn’t asked. I said no. Then they asked if I needed anything. I said I needed a real bathroom, and the female officer, saying she didn’t blame me, offered to take me to the officers’ bathroom. I must have peed straight for five minutes.

She walked me back to my cell, telling me it was for my own protection as they had brought in the rest of the passengers for questioning. They would fetch my stuff from the plane and allow me to call my husband. My cell had been occupied by the Indian man I had sat next to on the plane and in the squad car. So I waited for them to move him to the second cell that was holding the watch stealer. As I passed by the small window in that room I could see the watch stealer splayed out on the cot. He appeared to be asleep. I wondered where the Indian man would sit.

After fingerprinting me and asking me about my height/weight/place and date of birth and so on, a middle-aged white cop with a beer belly and a flat top returned me–without handcuffs–to the cell. I waited, wondering if I would be spending the night locked up. I thought about the last words my husband said to me while I was still on the plane waiting on the tarmac, “They must have found out there was a Hebshi on the plane.” We joke about this at times, that because of my ethnicity I am being scrutinized but I had no intention of putting that out to the universe and making it happen.

I thought about Malcom X and how bravely and fastidiously he studied and wrote while he was in prison, how his solitude enabled him to transform his anger into social change and personal betterment. That’s when I decided to write this post. I needed to explain what had happened–was happening–to me. I was not going to be silent. Still, I wondered what my rights were, and though I felt violated and scared I wasn’t sure that our new laws protected me from this treatment.

The female agent returned to my cell with my cell phone. She wanted me to show her my tweets–that were simultaneously posted onto Facebook–I had composed while on the plane. She joked that she didn’t even have a Facebook account. She left for a few minutes then returned and allowed me to call my husband. She said I would be released in a few minutes.

The sound of his voice brought me to tears, but I tried to remain calm. I gave him a one-minute recap of my situation, which only left him confused. I told him I would call him when I got to my car, which was parked in an airport lot.

I hung up the phone and followed the officer out of the cell and into another small room where the male FBI agent was waiting accompanied by another FBI agent–possibly the head honcho on duty. He said the three of us were being released and there was nothing suspicious found on the plane. He apologized for what had happened and thanked me for understanding and cooperating. He said, “It’s 9/11 and people are seeing ghosts. They are seeing things that aren’t there.” He said they had to act on a report of suspicious behavior, and this is what the reaction looks like.

He said there had been 50 other similar incidents across the country that day.

I was led out another door and down a long hall where I gathered my bags, which had been removed from the plane and searched. In the hallway I saw the other two men who had also been detained. They seemed happy to be being released as well. It felt strange to smile at them, and I didn’t know what to say, so I said nothing.

We walked outside of the building, and for the first time I saw that we were at the airport police station, which also doubled as the spot for the local Homeland Security office to reside–an office that didn’t exist 10 years ago. It was starting to get dark. But I still didn’t know what time it was.

Another officer drove me to my car in the airport parking lot. As he plopped into the drivers seat and me into the passenger’s seat of the unmarked sedan, he apologized for not having air conditioning, but, I thought snarkily, being a descendant of desert people I obviously didn’t mind the heat. He asked me if I was OK to drive back to my home in Ohio, and I said I was, though I wasn’t sure I was. I wasn’t sure how this would affect me. I am still not sure.

All I know, is I probably won’t be flying again on Sept. 11.

In the aftermath of my events on Sept. 11, 2011, I feel violated, humiliated and sure that I was taken from the plane simply because of my appearance. Though I never left my seat, spoke to anyone on the flight or tinkered with any “suspicious” device, I was forced into a situation where I was stripped of my freedom and liberty that so many of my fellow Americans purport are the foundations of this country and should be protected at any cost.

I believe in national security, but I also believe in peace and justice. I believe in tolerance, acceptance and trying–as hard as it sometimes may be–not to judge a person by the color of their skin or the way they dress. I admit to have fallen to the traps of convention and have made judgments about people that are unfounded. We live in a complicated world that, to me, seems to have reached a breaking point. The real test will be if we decide to break free from our fears and hatred and truly try to be good people who practice compassion–even toward those who hate.

I feel fortunate to have friends and family members who are sick over what happened to me. I share their disgust. But there was someone on that plane who felt threatened enough to alert the authorities. This country has operated for the last 10 years through fear. We’ve been a country at war and going bankrupt for much of this time. What is the next step?

You can read more about the ordeal from this AP report: http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2011/sep/11/us-airline-passengers-detained/

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3,569 Comments

  1. Erin O'Gara

     /  September 12, 2011

    This is beautiful, Shoshana – had me in tears throughout and I couldn’t agree with you more. I’m so sorry that this horrible thing happened to you, but am thankful that you are home safe and sound. Lots of hugs and love to you!

    Reply
    • People have become so paranoid, scared of every shadow, every whisper that isn’t government sanctioned. I am ashamed of people who react blindly. The sad truth is, the terrorists did win that day. 10 years later, people are still terrified. That’s the entire goal of terrorism..until America stops the blind fear that makes situations like this possible, they will continue to win.

      Reply
      • Well said Dallas.

        Reply
        • Tanya Harris

           /  September 13, 2011

          If they ever thanked me for “being understanding,” I would have responded, “I understand there will always be bigots.”
          I wish I could say it will never happen again, but I’m fairly certain it will. Hopefully not to you, but definitely to someone else. I hope you bang a whole lot of pots and pans together. I hope you get people’s attention so that this school-yard bullying is exposed.
          And by the way, who’s to say that a “passenger” reported suspicious activity even though they say this was the case? I hate to say it, but maybe the group of you met their racial profiling criteria.
          Bye the way, love the blog.
          Tanya in Norfolk, Virginia

          Reply
          • I’d be so angry at the unknown person who reported the “suspicious” activity. You definitely handled this with a lot more patience than I would have.

            Reply
          • Toni

             /  September 15, 2011

            I grew up in Communist country. It looked the same.

            Reply
            • After visiting Russia in 2005, I noticed a lot of similarities between the US and Russia in terms of the paranoia and possibility of things like this happening. I pretty much believe that the terrorists that do exist out there are pretty much people all acting in response to oppression of this sort and this kind of policing helps them rather than cures the situation. If can make a global standard for common sense treatment of people, this BS can end tomorrow. Unfortunately, things in most of the West will have to get worse first over the next decade before people really hit the limit. There is also too much information available for people to properly pursue issues, and the administrators of the US, Nato, EU know this.

              Reply
      • Amanda

         /  September 12, 2011

        You hit the nail on the head there, Dallas.

        Reply
      • Allison

         /  September 12, 2011

        In addition to your excellent comment, the terrorists have also won in that they’ve divided us even further. We had racial tension and race- and religion-based bigotry prior to 9/11, but it’s gotten so much more intense since then.

        If the terrorists wanted to destroy America by turning us into each other’s enemies, they’ve accomplished that task.

        Reply
        • Russ

           /  September 13, 2011

          Do you think that is a result of terrorism, or perhaps the advent of social networking, anonymous blogging, and the many other ways people can express hatred with no consequences?

          That’s not to say that there is any hatred in what has been written here in your comments, but I think we have many outlets for hatred that didn’t exist 10 years ago. This doesn’t stink of being a result of 9/11 to me. I think the author’s experience is awful and I wish it hadn’t happened, but I am also somewhat grateful for a system which does look into what someone may perceive as a serious threat. I survived the attack on Tower 1 of the World Trade Center on 9/11 so my perspective may somewhat subjective, but I would rather be detained or searched (and I was searched unnecessarily many times in the years immediately following the attacks) than have no tools for reporting something that may look suspicious to me. That being said, I think I have the ability to be rational enough not to report three people sitting on a plane not interacting with one another simply because they look suspicious for no reason other than my paranoia and the color of their skin.

          Anyway, I don’t think the terrorists “won” because of this scenario. I think someone was very inconvenienced and humiliated and this is a lesson in why the methods to keep us safe need to be further refined, but at least there are efforts out there to do so.

          Reply
          • Liz

             /  September 13, 2011

            “Searched”???! SEARCHED??!! The author wasn’t “searched,” she was STRIP searched!!! And, to you, that’s merely an “inconvenience”?? She was *imprisoned* and that’s just an “inconvenience”?? I’m so glad you survived the 9/11 attacks, but to in any way, whatsoever, try to justify the cretins who reported “suspicious” behavior based *solely” on the physicaly appearance of the author is, well, criminal and obscene. There is no justification for what that idiot did. Their abject paranoia may be a *reason* but it is not an excuse. There is no excuse, and they should be subjected to the same “inconvenience” that the author and the other two passengers were. Period, end of story. The terrorists HAVE won, because you think that the pathetic “scared” passenger did the right thing and you think that the author was merely inconvenienced because we have to be so scared that we utterly trash the Constitution by subjecting citizens to unreasonable search and seizure. DHS could have checked her background without all of that and found she was no threat, but they decided to go through with this heinous crime anyway. Inconvenienced, my arse.

            Reply
            • Marla

               /  September 16, 2011

              Liz, I’m reading no further after your post because you have said it all. Besides, I don’t think I could emotionally handle any of the gung-ho TSA responses which are surely here somewhere. Shoshanna’s log of events is one of the scariest accountings of this national stupidity I’ve read to date.

              Reply
          • Allison

             /  September 13, 2011

            I believe it’s a variety of factors, yes, and the anonymity of social media is a part of the change. But yes, I do believe that a huge percentage of it started because of 9/11.

            While you, personally, may be rational enough to not report in that situation, clearly someone was not. And that, to me, is the most frightening aspect of this security theater nonsense that we’re forced to endure. Unsubstantiated reports of unspecified suspicious activity are taken at face value by authorities who then cuff people, sequester them, strip-search them, and interrogate them. Who assesses the validity of the original complaint? No one. Who’s held responsible when innocent people have their Constitutional rights violated for no reason? No one, because the original report can be just some jackass on a plane.

            There is a middle ground between having “no tools for reporting” and violating people’s rights based on unsubstantiated rumor. We have to find that middle ground.

            Reply
            • Niraj K. yadav

               /  September 13, 2011

              Well stated rebuttal, Allison.

              I’m of Indian descent, with both my parents being Indian immigrants to the US. Having been born in the US, I’m a citizen by birth, but one of those two men could easily have been me on that plane. And nothing scares me more than the fact that I can be targeted (yet again) simply because of the color of my skin.

              My question to those who feel it is not a major outlet from 9/11 is this: If the people beside her had been Caucasian,, would this have ever been reported? Or, instead, as I’ve seen happen on many a flight, would a steward(ess) have rather made sure the individual(s) in question were OK, understanding that illness does occur amongst people of all walks of life and that just because 3 people sitting together seem to be of a similar race does not necessarily mean that they are actually in some sort of conspiracy to commit a crime? I highly doubt it.

              Reply
              • dave

                 /  September 14, 2011

                If this had been racial profiling, wouldn’t some action have been taken much sooner than near the conclusion of the flight? I gather that nothing was noted as unusual about any of this threesome until the two men went to the bathroom together and spent ‘a long time in there’. I imagine (tens of) thousands of middle easterners were probably flying that day – as they were the days before and immediately after 9/11. Were all of these also detained and questioned? We have only heard one side of this ‘story’ (which is all we will get given protocols agencies have to follow), but, gee, there could be a second side to the matter.

                So….is it better to ignore suspicious behavior – under the guise of being politically correct – and have a plane blown up instead killing a hundred?
                Okay, maybe it’s just me…but I guess I would consider it a bit odd if two men that apparently don’t know each other go into the lavatory together and spend an ‘inordinately long time in there’ together….

                Reply
                • Englishman

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  As a European “anglo-saxon”, I have no trouble with this over cautious reaction, given the level of concern about the significance of the date. BUT, there is no excuse for this level of discourtesy.
                  It is very possible to show a MUCH higher respect for the detainee whilever the possibility remains that they (the authorities) will ultimately decide that there is no case to answer.
                  Unfortunately, my limited experience of US homeland security, in the form of Passport control both in 1974, 2003 2004 and in 2006, is one of open hostility to non-US visitors.

                  Reply
                • Gigi G.

                   /  September 19, 2011

                  Oh now Dave…I wasn’t going to make any comment here because there are already so many great remarks but I have to respond to your nonsense.

                  You obviously have no experience traveling on planes. What you suggest is just so utterly ignorant I can’t possibly be more polite about it. It is not at ALL uncommon for the two passengers…to get up and go to toilets at the same time. It happens like this…the guy on the outside has to go so when he dos the guy sitting in the middle (she said she was sitting by the window) decides it’s a good time to go too. That way he won’t disturb the other guy later…it happens all the time. It’s called consideration and convenience and it isn’t strange. It is only strange to people who are paranoid and racist! AND do you know WHY someone might spend an inordinate amount of time in the toilet? It’s called constipation and it happens OFTEN when traveling on airplanes!

                  And who is so frigging nosey that they would even be keeping track of how long someone goes to the toilet? A busy body…that’s who.
                  And what? They were in the SAME toilet cubicle together? I doubt it. This is just a case of some nosey biddy body doing what they do best: gossip. And I’ll just bet you if any one bothered to check the person who raised the alarm probably has a history of “raising the alarm”.

                  And don’t tell me that our very “intelligent” (I use the term loosely) FBI couldn’t have assessed the situation and figured out just by quietly doing their homework on these people before the plane even touched the ground that there was no risk.

                  It is an utter travesty and total nonsense.

                  Reply
                • jon

                   /  September 21, 2011

                  My bet is that the complainant was someone who was fed up at the time the Indian gentlemen spent in the toilets. I also get pissed of with such people, which normally includes almost everyone except me.

                  On a different note, I long ago added the US to the list of countries I will not visit, along with Somalia and Yemen. The only time I accidentally visited the US was a transit in Guam in 2007 en route to Majuro – a very unpleasant meeting with some TSA goons and a destroyed suitcase.

                  Reply
              • HELLLLLOOOO!!!???? ioF COURSE A CAUCASIAN ISNT GOING TO BE STOPPED. THE RADICAL TERRORISTS ARE NOT CAUCASIAN. THEY ARE DARKER MIDDLE EASTERN LOOKING. GET OVER YOUR SELF. IF YOU ALL DONT LIKE THE WAY YOUR BEING TREATED THEN GO TO A COUNTRY WHERE YOU BETTER FIT IN AND YOUR CIVIL LIBERTIES ARE NONE. SELFISH SELFISH SELFISH SELFISH. ALL I KNOW IS MY DOLLAR BILL SAYS-IN GOD WE TRUST…AND I DO , AND SO DID MY GREAT GREAT GRANDFATHER WHO SWEAT HIS A22 OFF TO HELP GROOM THIS COUNTRY FOR FREEDOMS THAT YOU PEOPLE RATHER COMPLAIN ABOUT THAN APPRECIATE. SHAME ON EVERYONE THAT COMMENTED ON THIS POSTMAYBE YOU COULD CRY YOUR SAD STORY TO THE FDNY WHO LOST BROTHERS PICKING UP THE PIECES. YOUR SO SAD YOU WERE PROFILED FOR LOOKING EXACTLY WHAT YOU ARE.

                Reply
                • R.A.

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  “THE RADICAL TERRORISTS ARE NOT CAUCASIAN…” Meet Scott Roeder, the murderer of abortion doctor George Tiller. Mr. Roeder is a heavy set, middle aged white man. And murdering people for offering a legal medical service certainly qualifies as radical and terrorist.

                  Shame on you for your outright racism.

                  Reply
                • Jules

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  “THE RADICAL TERRORISTS ARE NOT CAUCASIAN…”
                  And don’t forget Terry Nichols and Timothy McVeigh, who bombed the federal building in Oklahoma City. Or Anders Behring Breivik, the white conservative “Christian” who opened fire at a summer camp in Norway and killed 69 people, mostly kids.

                  Your fear mongering and racism are how the terrorists win.

                  Reply
                • Mike

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  “IF YOU ALL DONT LIKE THE WAY YOUR BEING TREATED THEN GO TO A COUNTRY WHERE YOU BETTER FIT IN AND YOUR CIVIL LIBERTIES ARE NONE. ”
                  Why would he go live in some other country when he is born here.

                  “YOUR SO SAD YOU WERE PROFILED FOR LOOKING EXACTLY WHAT YOU ARE.”
                  You are saying he is a terrorist because he is brown. Go fucck yourself you racist cunnt.

                  Reply
                  • Bean

                     /  September 16, 2011

                    Ok as racist as this KimberleyAlohr is there is no reason to use a slur that is usually directed at women. Anonymous Mike at least spell the word correctly.

                    Reply
                    • The point about not resorting to that kind of insult is apt, but he misspelled the terms to avoid any censor.

                    • Ron

                       /  October 19, 2011

                      You know, I normally hate the use of the C word, but Kimberly is such an abhorrent person it somehow seems appropriate.

                • Wow, Kimberly Lohr, you might be the most ignorant person in the world. Your grandfather fought to protect everyone’s rights, but you support the trampling of the rights of your fellow American? It seems that you cherish the freedom that you have, but don’t seem to care if a brown skinned person is locked up for no reason other than her appearance. Hypocrisy is the worst of all sins.

                  If you’re not downright stupid, then you are a horrible person. I hope it’s just stupid – for that you’d at least have my sympathy.

                  Reply
                • Nullifidian

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  “AND SO DID MY GREAT GREAT GRANDFATHER WHO SWEAT HIS A22 OFF TO HELP GROOM THIS COUNTRY FOR FREEDOMS THAT YOU PEOPLE RATHER COMPLAIN ABOUT THAN APPRECIATE.”

                  You mean the ‘freedom’ to be whisked off a plane, strip searched, and interrogated just because the most paranoid or racist idiot on the plane has decided to make an anonymous phone call?

                  In that case, screw you and screw your great-great-grandfather for having forced that kind of ‘freedom’ on the U.S.

                  Reply
                  • Then you need to leave the usa

                    Reply
                    • SilenceDogood

                       /  September 16, 2011

                      No, Hazey, people like you who so badly want your security at any cost need to leave the USA for places where that already exists. Those places are called North Korea, Iran, Cuba, for starters. I hear they’re lovely this time of year, and offer the best of safety and security for their citizens.

                      Get a clue.

                • YOU ARE SO RIGHT !!!!

                  Reply
                  • orangecountyresident

                     /  September 16, 2011

                    Hazey, people like you and Kimberly cause me to lose respect for this country. And no, I’m not going to leave. I’m going to stay here and vote for people that don’t think like you two. People like you and Kimberly are a million times worse than the terrorists who attacked us on 9/11.

                    Reply
                • orangecountyresident

                   /  September 16, 2011

                  Wow Kimberly, you are a racist pig. It’s people like you that make me ashamed of this country and you are one of the reasons why I didn’t go to any 9/11 memorials. Too many people who remember the victims of 9/11 think like you. I believe your reaction to 9/11 is a million times worse than 9/11 itself.

                  Reply
                • Mike

                   /  September 18, 2011

                  To begin with, you don’t have to shout. It makes me think you’re crazy. And second, unless you are of Asian or African descent, I doubt seriously that your Great Great Grandfather sweated much at all. It was people of the aforementioned descent who did all the real work of building this country. And by the way, there have been Caucasians who have been arrested for acts or intent to commit acts of terrorism. First, there were the Oklahoma City Bombers and then there was Jihad Jane who was arrested last year in Philadelphia. She was blond and blue. Get a grip and learn something.

                  Reply
                  • Apa

                     /  September 19, 2011

                    “Unless you are of Asian or African descent, I doubt seriously that your Great Great Grandfather sweated much at all.”

                    Unfair and unwarranted. Go look up the history of Irish immigration to this country. Look up the history of factory labor, especially before the Workers’ Rights movement took off.

                    Feeding trolls never comes to anything good. And usually drives otherwise sane people to say things they wouldn’t.

                    Reply
                • googlie@yahoo.net

                   /  October 2, 2011

                  Wow, you’re an idiot. If you even had the slightest clue what the real definition of terrorism is and pay attention to what’s happening in this country you would understand that the largest group of radical terrorists in the world who are bent on terrorizing the people of amerika, and the world for that latter, are predominately white ameriken flag, badge wearing. gun toting overweight illiterate gas holes. You and your country don’t even have a dollar bill as every dollar in circulation in the US is borrowed from foreign interests including the paper it is printed on because your great grandfather wasn’t as great as you imagine him to be. Furthermore if your God was anything more than an imaginary low life loser you would actually trust him for your protection and not some gun toting, psychologically unstable, otherwise unemployable complete stranger.

                  If you believe civil liberties is having some complete stranger chain you up at the barrel of a gun and jam their hands up your A22 for their pleasure and imagined “protection” you should remove your head from yours and start feeling the freedom.

                  It would be great if you and your ilk would leave instead of destroying this country with your idiocracy.

                  Reply
                • Carmen LeBlanc

                   /  October 4, 2011

                  “THE RADICAL TERRORISTS ARE DARKER MIDDLE EASTERN LOOKING…”

                  Yea, ’cause the Northern Irish terrorists have REALLY dark skin.

                  Reply
                • Walter Freeman

                   /  January 26, 2013

                  There is no TSA profile to itentify dangerous, arrogant, racist swinenetts at present but you have given us a great start on a working outline. Thanks. We’ll be in TOUCH.

                  Reply
            • Common sense is the middle ground . . . before law enforcement reacts as they reacted here there must be probable cause to react. what exactly is the probable cause to detain here? Some person with zero law enforcement training sees two dark skinned men get up at the same time to go to the bathroom and somehow that arises to the level of detention and strip searching. Really? Thats where we are now? I want to understand where the ability came here for the government to detail the passengers, handcuff, strip search and then

              I heard ZERO evidence that would lead one to believe that there were explosives involved here – that was a fiction invented by the government to justify what they had done to that moment. “Oh, we’d better check for explosives” Hey idiots – the plane was ON THE GROUND AT ITS DESTINATION! If they were going to blow it up they would not do so after it landed at its destination.

              Is there ANY common sense left in our nation?

              There was ZERO reason to detain, ZERO reason to search and zero reason to question. They certainly can talk to these guys all they want – my reaction would have been silence. F you. My practice is never speak to the police – end of story. You have a problem with that? Wait a minute? Am I being detained? If so why? Am I free to go? What are the facts upon which you are basing your detention – the time has come to end the idiots running around trying to justify the billions spent on their toys.

              Reply
              • Arif

                 /  September 13, 2011

                First of all, I feel for the lady and the other two and the rest of people (crew/passengers) for what the went through.

                Wow, you are one sharp cookie. Have you forgotten this is the nation where at one point the whole family or anyone can walk up the the terminal, see their friends or family members get on the plane. And if you were like my family, you would wait till the plane takes off and then leave the terminal. What changed and who changed it?
                Have you forgotten how many lives are taken away from how many loved ones? Have thought about how many people were affected by the attack? Have you wonder what those families (left behind) are going through? People who survived are still having nightmares.
                I’m Christian and a US citizen, but because I’m from Pakistan my airline ticket is always marked ‘randomly’. I don’t have any problem with it. USA has every right to protect their properties anyways she wants. If I or anyone don’t like it, can leave and go back to their homes.
                The fact is, this is my home, I’m afraid to go back home (Pakistan) because Muslims, so called radicals are killing Christians without any reason.
                If this incident were to take place on Pakistan airline, with an american or even a Paki christian involved, how do you think it would’ve went?
                I tell you how. The detained persons would be either be sent to prison with some religious blame if no explosive found, then killed. Stop blaming USA for what it has become, it is our fault. We just have to live with it.

                Reply
              • Irish

                 /  September 15, 2011

                Finally!! The patriot speaks! How dare they treat the author in such an ridiculous fashion! What are the charges, Probable cause, Warrant? Who swore to the fact that they where suspicious? Who started this mess and let it continue to propagate? The only thing that separates us from the “disappearances” of the Nazi regime is the Constitution and our Bill of Rights. NONE of which has been repealed! If this happened 50 times that day, there should be 50 cases filed in Federal court. WHERE IS THE OUTRAGE? The reason the toilet in her cell was dirty is because they had been using it to flush America down the drain! GGGGRRRR!

                Reply
                • ruth

                   /  September 18, 2011

                  Arif and Irish – the extent that they investigated still does not warrant a STRIP search including CAVITY search of this woman. She did not even go to the bathroom – the people sitting next to her did. Let’s see how well you do with a stranger poking around in your vagina or butthole when you’ve done nothing and every indication of your demeanor and response is that you have no idea what’s going on.

                  Reply
              • There is a story developing in this thread that someone “paranoid” on the plane saw something like “two dark-skinned men get up together to go to the bathroom” and this is being discussed vis-a-vis the plausibility or not of making a (racially profiled) report to the authorities. Let’s stop that right now.

                No such passenger is needed (you could blame the flight crew instead; perhaps even a more plausible angle to take, as they’d have the ability to report suspicious activity in-flight more readily than people with Facebook and iPhones, etc), but this is not necessary either. Moreover, it doesn’t matter what the men did or didn’t do. They could have sat there sleeping the whole time, it makes no difference, so let’s stop trying to understand this in terms that we can imagine as rationally plausible or possible.

                We are, of course, hopelessly naive in the United States about this sort of thing. We have no familiarity with informants and
                informing on the mass-scale like they saw in the Soviet Union or in Romania, where it was facetiously referred to as the national sport.

                Whatever we are going to have “security” look like, the very fact that it is this kind of response and that it encourages people to be informants (whether this is a case of one or not) is the larger issue we should be concerned with, whether we think we’ll be detained or not–because eventually comes the day when “your kind” will be detained, and by then, it’ll be too late.

                Wh

                Reply
                • There is a story developing in this thread that someone “paranoid” on the plane saw something like “two dark-skinned men get up together to go to the bathroom” and this is being discussed vis-a-vis the plausibility or not of making a (racially profiled) report to the authorities. Let’s stop that right now.

                  That’s not “a story developing,” it’s what happened. That’s established. So is the practice of “dropping a dime” on someone by making a false report, which is not what happened here. The discussion is not about the theories, it’s about a specific event that is holographically indicative of a change in American society that is producing social friction and dislocation, and about how to reverse it. Those who read the entire thread are able to discern this and avoid tangential discussions.

                  Thank you for tuning in to the discussion. There are other discussions taking place elsewhere.

                  Reply
                  • Snow Leopard

                     /  October 9, 2011

                    Shaykh al-Hajj Dawud Ahmad al-Amriki: thank you for keeping things focused. What I meant by the “developing story” was the thread of the story as it was being told in the comments. For example, at some point (below), someone finally discovers that it was a flight attendant (Elizabeth Something) who did the reporting, and then later, that she was passing on anonymous information from other travelers. That’s what I mean by the “developing story”. The facts of what actually happened are, of course, already established. People in this thread were getting bogged down over details that, in the contextual significance of this event, either don’t matter or are usually taken by people to make excuses for it happening, just as people in Soviet Russia made up reasons why the security forces were carrying away their neighbors. Such details here included bluntly suggesting that the original poster must have been doing SOMETHING suspicious or whether the two men went to the bathroom at the same time or went to the same bathroom at the same time–one guy even develops a whole doctrine of how to fly, saying if you DO get up to go to the bathroom at the same time as someone else, tell the stewardess that you’re going back for gay sex. I’d like to think he was being ironic or trying to be funny, but I don’t think he was.

                    In this particular post, I wanted to draw attention to the fact that the specifics of WHO did the reporting matters less than that SOMEONE made a report, and that it wouldn’t matter what the two men or the original poster were doing, and in fact didn’t matter. That’s what I wanted to underline.

                    I appreciate your comments in this massive thread generally. Thank you.

                    Reply
                    • In this particular post, I wanted to draw attention to the fact that the specifics of WHO did the reporting matters less than that SOMEONE made a report, and that it wouldn’t matter what the two men or the original poster were doing, and in fact didn’t matter. That’s what I wanted to underline.

                      We’re witnessing a generation for whom oppression and tyranny are “givens” and inconsequential if they have no first-hand experience or are able to avoid them. This may be persistent.

                      I appreciate your comments in this massive thread generally. Thank you.

                      Thank you. It’s a holographic portrait of the quasi-literate middle-management demographic sector of the collapsing economic order, with occasional glimpses of the more subjugated classes. I see a few armchair revolutionaries, a bit of magistry, but virtually no statecraft. Sadly, that’s not a surprise.

            • Tina

               /  September 14, 2011

              Ma’am it sounds to me like they were researching the validity of the complaint by taking her away in cuffs in case the complaint was valid and there was a security risk. Putting her in a room alone where she couldn’t talk to others if she had “cohorts” and searching her for any items pertaining to a terrorist threat.

              We do live in a paranoid society, but we also have some reason to be concerned. We’re hearing everyday of people using their CHILDREN as bombs, or hiding explosives up their derrieres. People are crazy, and they do these things because they think that they’ll get through basic searches if they go to extremes.

              Had she been a threat, and somebody was concerned and brought her to attention and they said no we want to be politically correct and not stop her, or just ask her her name and see she’s an american citizen so not wanting to go against her rights let her go what would have happened if she’d walked into the airport and blown herself up in the middle of it? They’d be shocked, and angry, and how could you let her go, how could you not look into it, it was brought to your attention, etc. Just like 9/11 there were reports, and information that wasn’t acted upon.

              The part of the entire story that bothers me is the lack of respect, in my opinion they needed to detain her and follow through with making sure she wasn’t a risk, but they could have been more courteous about it on the off chance she wasn’t a risk and was just trying to get home. If it were me on a plane with my child and I saw something suspicious i’d hope like hell my comments wouldn’t be ignored. And two people getting up at the same time and going to the bathroom IS kinda weird. We have no clue if they were concerned because of the color of their skin, or because these men were getting up and walking out of view together.

              Reply
              • “We do live in a paranoid society, but we also have some reason to be concerned. We’re hearing everyday of people using their CHILDREN as bombs, or hiding explosives up their derrieres. People are crazy, and they do these things because they think that they’ll get through basic searches if they go to extremes.”

                Where exactly are you hearing of those things?

                Reply
                • kabdoo

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  Good catch, John. I was wondering about that myself. It seems to me people who believe they are “hearing everyday of people using their children as bombs” will inevitably be anxious and trigger happy when it comes to reporting suspicious behaviour. I think the media and the government have a lot to answer for as they have created this climate of fear that turns people against each other.

                  @Tina: Please think about what you said there. Think about a parent using their child as a bomb. Would you do it? Of course not. Would your neighbour do it? Of course not. In fact you’ll find a lot more children harmed by their parents through abuse or even homicide after a marriage breakup.

                  Either you believe there are a lot of mentally ill parents out there who would do what most parents would say is the worst thing a parent could do in their life or you believe certain people are predisposed to such acts of violence that somehow the rest of the civilised world is immune to.

                  Sting wrote a great song that tried to point out that the cold war created barriers between people who were essentially the same. It was called “I Hope the Russians Love their Children Too”.

                  I put it to you that human beings are all the same all over the world, regardless of race or religion. What you fear is IMAGINARY, or at the very least, greatly exaggerated. When you realise this, you will be freed from the shackles of fear and be able to live a normal life. I live in Australia where this climate of fear exists too, but it’s being directed at Asylum Seekers. All common sense has gone out the window and many people want them to be left to die on their boats. It’s shameful but the root cause is the same – unfounded FEAR.

                  Reply
                  • Actually, the song was just titled “Russians”. But everything else, Kabdoo, I agree with in your comments. I’ve never heard anyone saying that “they use children for bombs.” It’s a total line of bullshit and fearmongering, hands down.

                    Reply
                • Martha

                   /  September 16, 2011

                  It may not be happening here in the USA but it does happen over in Israel. One Israeli once said something to the effect that the Palestinians would stop using their young as suicide bombers when the parents loved their children more than they hated the Jewish people.

                  Reply
                  • Have people registered yet that Palestinians aren’t using suicide bombers anymore?

                    Reply
                    • SilenceDogood

                       /  September 16, 2011

                      Or that children are not being used as bomb mules in the US?

              • bn1511

                 /  September 15, 2011

                This is the stupidest thing I have ever heard…

                I don’t understand why the behavior of the two men, one following another to the bathroom, is in the least bit suspicious…

                If I don’t have the aisle, I almost always wait for the person in the aisle to go to the bathroom before I go… it’s less disruptive and I think it’s more respectful (though not required) of your fellow passenger…

                This is disgusting beyond words… that we corrupt basic human dignity and behavior in the name of “security.”

                As someone who flies 100 plus times a year, I know how irritated I would be if someone in the window seat always wanted to make me move so they can go to the toilet and I know how appreciative I would be if they coordinated their “visits” with mine.

                But then, I don’t look at people of color and instantly reach conclusions about their motivation.

                I hope you and your child always stay safe but understand that sacrificing basic human dignity at the altar of “feeling good” will only ensure your child will grow up in a world full of bigotry and hate. If that’s what you want then by all means, soldier on.

                Reply
              • Ravan Asteris

                 /  September 15, 2011

                So all forms of fascism are justified for the CHILDREN? What kind of world does that leave the CHILDREN, then? Do you want your CHILDREN to grow up worry that they might be detained based on the color of their skin, way they dress, or slang they speak?

                If you’re going to bring the “FOR THE CHILDREN” argument in think it all the way through.

                Reply
                • “Using their Children as bombs” is much worse than a justification for fascism. It serves to dehumanize “them”, as well as justify a fascist response.

                  Reply
              • “on the off chance she wasn’t a risk”

                Really? The “off chance” that she’s not trying to blow up a plane?

                The whole situation was far too much for some paranoid racist saying that fiddling with a phone and sitting next to other dark skinned people is ‘suspicious’.

                By your logic we should have a nice trustworthy grandma eyeing people as they enter the airpoirt and just pointing out the ‘dodgy looking’ ones, and questioning them for 6 hours each. After all, “what would have happened if they’d walked into the airport and blown themselves up in the middle of it?” “Why didn’t you trust the grandma?!” they’d cry!

                Reply
              • ruth

                 /  September 18, 2011

                Tina – the extent that they investigated still does not warrant a STRIP search including CAVITY search of this woman. She did not even go to the bathroom – the people sitting next to her did. Let’s see how well you do with a stranger poking around in your vagina or butthole when you’ve done nothing and every indication of your demeanor and response is that you have no idea what’s going on.

                Reply
              • Ron

                 /  October 19, 2011

                No. No. No. Getting up to use the restroom at the same time as your neighbor is not weird. It’s courteous, so you don’t have to bother them later. I do this all the time. Your paranoid behavior is making me reconsider being courteous.

                Reply
                • Paul

                   /  October 23, 2011

                  The plane was on the ground. The possible danger was past. Actions after that were unnecessary.

                  Reply
            • Shoshana, thank you for sharing your horrendous ordeal with us; it is too too real. Since 9/11, Americans have been encouraged to fear and to be suspicious of others. It seems that..a sick paranoia has been seeded into the minds and hearts of Americans of “the other.” It is regrettable and unjust that these “false witnesses” are never identified or made responsible for their actions/diminuendo’s .. It is a disgrace that we don’t even know our rights…for it seems that you had none…just no words for you, no answers for you…just the guilty until proven not guilty treatment; certainly not in keeping with the American Justice System.
              Thank you again. You are one remarkable woman.

              Reply
            • Ev Sayan

               /  September 14, 2011

              Completely agree with Allison above. There are no easy answers, but we’ve been blasted too much by fear and unfortunately that is a great tool for the use of power without regard. We, the people, have to keep up the pressure on the authorities to find a middle ground – to protect us without violating us. I am confident a nation like this one, founded on those very principles, can face that challenge and reach that goal!

              Reply
            • Jason

               /  September 14, 2011

              It is unfortunatate that this happens at all. I’m of ethnic origin myself (not sure exactly which because my mother was adopted) and so I consider myself black. Since 9/11 I noticed that ‘at random’ must be written somewhere on my birth certificate. Every flight I have been on since, I have been instructed to remove my shoes and go through screening processess different from the other passengers. As a former member of a special operations unit, I’m appalled at the ‘freedom’ I put my life on the line for. I’m just glad you have a means of telling people the ordeals people of ethniticity go through while the majority of the population [read caucasions] simply view it as being ‘vigilant’.

              Reply
            • ReelBadArabs

               /  September 14, 2011

              Suspicion of Arabs began over 100 years ago with a systematic vilification of ‘Arabs by Hollywood as researched and documented by Dr. Jack Shaeheen:

              http://www.atlantamagazine.com/atlintel/culture/blogentry.aspx?blogEntryID=10263598

              http://www.wolfmanproductions.com/shaheen.html

              http://www.reelbadarabs.com/

              Reply
              • Missa

                 /  September 15, 2011

                Is this Professor Shaheen? I met you and your wife in Columbia Missouri several years ago after you gave a presentation. My little son was the one that complained he wanted to go home so he wouldn’t miss Leno. And you said your daughter worked for him

                Reply
            • Dan from NYC

               /  September 14, 2011

              @ Allison – Having traveled quite a bit both domestically and internationally over the years I can authoritatively state that current U.S. procedures may seem stringent but are far less so than other “active” zones.

              Regarding first verifying the validity of the report, elsewhere herein I stated the case thus, “everything that occurred once the report(s) were transmitted to the flight crew is exactly what one would demand of our law enforcement entities. A report must be taken with the greatest gravity until proved otherwise.

              A softer response would put that plane at a gate, adjacent to other aircraft and underground fuel lines and the deplaned passengers in a much more heavily populated terminal. Had the threat been an actual assault with massive death and mayhem resulting, would we not be excoriating law enforcement for their “lack of vision”?”

              No one’s rights were violated to say otherwise displays a layman’s misunderstanding of the law. I agree that since 9-11 the threshold of “reasonable” search and seizure [4th Amendment] has been redefined.by the circumstances arising from those events. The very ambiguity of the use of the phrase “reasonable” allows for interpretation as society’s needs change. So legal definitions may change without any actual infringement occurring.

              As such, it is not the law or it’s enforcement that is at fault. It is our individual lack of awareness of the law as well the definition and significance of the words employed, the ultimate and final arbiter being the SCOTUS.

              All that being as it is, well before the events of 9-11 the well established exception called, “Exigent Circumstance” existed. [Wikipedia/4th amendment/5.4] “Exigent circumstances arise when the law enforcement officers have reasonable grounds to believe that there is an immediate need to protect their lives, the lives of others, their property, or that of others, the search is not motivated by an intent to arrest and seize evidence, and there is some reasonable basis, to associate an emergency with the area or place to be searched.”

              Reply
              • Cindy

                 /  September 14, 2011

                So some college kid playing a “prank”, some bigot who doesn’t like the color of your skin, some mentally unstable person….basically anyone can say anything without validation???? I guarantee you that if the three of them had been white, nothing would have happened. End of story. You can try to make it sound better by saying that law enforcement had to act on the report….but who made the report? There are a lot of bigots in this country and a lot of people use the bathroom on planes. Are we now going to let them all be handcuffed, detained and strip searched without even telling them what is going on? I say you detain the person who reported the activity and strip search them. Whose to say they are not deflecting attention away from themselves and are up to mischief. In no way was this right. From the “person” who reported it, to the flight crew who passed it on, to the police who detained and ultimately the FBI and Homeland Security. Thank goodness my skin is white so I can fly without fear even though she is just as much a citizen as I am. It is criminal and she should file a suit in a court of law. Then maybe things will change. Is Hitler ruling our country now??? Must everyone be white to have rights and not be “suspicious”?

                Reply
                • DavosSherman

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Cindy: Doubt it. Sounds more like a cabin flight crew-member who got nervous and jerky over someone taking a 20 minute $hit. If the flight deck crew had any doubts they should have diverted. The entire thing sounds like an absolute horse and pony show. A$$hole cops – what effing terrorsist would blow a plane up at the destination gate? I’m glad I’m no longer a line captain.

                  Reply
                  • John

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    BOYCOTT THE AIRLINE, teach them a lesson. Cabin crew are not trained to do these type of work.
                    What is worse is the plane was allowed to land and then moved to a less populated area.

                    Reply
                • Dan from NYC

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  You are assuming the report was racially motivated and presume that if the report was about a white person it would be ignored or handled differently. While Shoshanna may have “felt” it was racially motivated that doesn’t mean that in fact it was. To argue it was a racially motivated report replaces logic and analysis with supposition from a predisposed belief that is itself akin to the mind set of a racist.

                  Also to assume your white skin shields you from suspicion and experiencing a similar detention is based on a fallacy. I think one name should cover it, Timothy McVeigh. Do you honestly believe that law enforcement would ignore a report of suspicious activity made against three whites or that protocols would be different for them? Given Janet Napalitino’s expressed views on white terrorists you can be assured that Homeland Security’s response would be the same.

                  Reply
                  • Actually I think you’ll find that the accepted definition of something being racially motivated is that “if [only] one person thinks it is racially motivated, then it is.” Since the author does feel this way, the incident was therefore racially motivated.

                    Reply
                • Amen to that.

                  Reply
              • Jess

                 /  September 14, 2011

                You feel that the rights of human beings to be free from unnecessary, unwarranted, and unreasonable police detention and violation should be thrown out on the word of the stupidest, most cowardly cretin on an airplane?

                Why couldn’t you just go live in a country like that, instead of turning America into one?

                Reply
                • Dan from NYC

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Please define your terms, “unnecessary, unwarranted, and unreasonable” and what information you are basing that judgement call on. Drawing conclusions from fanciful predisposed beliefs rather than available facts is an emotional process and not a logical one.

                  I am sorry Shoshanna went through a very tough time. I can, and do, empathize with her and wish her a full recovery from this experience. Her anger and hurt are understandable emotional responses. But that can’t be the basis for designing response protocols to a potential threat.

                  Reply
                  • Irish

                     /  September 15, 2011

                    There was no threat. We can’t run around hiding from “potential threats”. Potential threats can come from misunderstandings, bigotry, emotion. There should be no actions on potential threats. Two guys get up to go to the bathroom who look like middle eastern men. They come back and sit next to a woman who looks middle eastern… Where is the threat? When the coward who started this asked the Flight attendant for help, she should have “shooshed” him… :) At the very least, she should have gone the the row, engaged the folks in conversation, asked if they needed anything. Is there still a threat? Are they acting strange, avoiding eye contact, covering an object under their shirt? You don’t need fancy training for this. Sadly, it involves common sense and some basic observation skills. YOU have to get involved
                    The fact is that there are SSSOOOO many security checks, searches and sweeps for the passengers and the plane before anyone boards. We need to ensure that there is a real reason to be worried before we call in the Police state. Waving it all off to “good protocols” is like slapping the author on the A$$ after her strip search and offering her a cigarette!
                    Shame on everyone who even thinks this behavior from our government and the people on this plane was somehow justified!

                    Reply
                  • Raging Itch

                     /  September 15, 2011

                    The “security” response was the worse kind: a false positive.

                    The people who had their rights violated were innocent. The fact that us there was a response in force means that resources were diverted from other, more credible, threats. There are finite resources, so wasting them on non-threats is dangerous.

                    If law enforcement is unable to determine if a report of suspicious behavior will pass the Sniff Test, then they are doing it wrong.
                    ——

                    BOTTOM LINE: the world isn’t safe. Everyone who reads this will die. You make the choice whether to live in fear or REFUSE TO BE TERRORIZED.

                    Reply
                    • Right. A false positive is the worst of all threats. We as citizens have a duty to appear and conduct ourselves at all times so that there is no possibility that we will arouse suspicion and divert the authorities from the real evildoers. Anything else is the moral equivalent of turning in a false alarm.

              • Allison

                 /  September 14, 2011

                The fact that other countries do worse things to fliers does not mean that we should either follow their example or be complacent when things happen here with which we disagree.

                What I expect of law enforcement officials is actually NOT to take every single report “seriously,” in the sense that every single report should be considered valid enough to strip search the subject of the report. In civilian law enforcement, when a report is made, the officers at least question the person making the report to determine, among other things, the validity of the report being made. They ask questions of the reporter to determine if the report has a basis in fact, and contains reasonable cause to follow up. As far as I can tell, reporters of “suspicious activity” on a plane are NOT treated in the same way – a person says “I am suspicious of X,” and the authorities basically say “OK!” and proceed with handcuffs, detention, strip searches, and interrogations.

                That’s not acceptable. The authorities should, at the very least, interview the reporter FIRST to determine if the reporter has any legitimacy to his or her claims. In the current situation, people make reports of suspicious activity are not held accountable for those reports. Such a system contains no checks and balances on people making the reports based on, as in this case, ethnicity rather than actual behavior (from what I can tell).

                There is a middle ground between what occurred, and the so-called “softer response” example you provide which is basically do nothing.

                The rest of your information is much appreciate, and I plan to read it in depth.

                Reply
                • Dan from NYC

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  You are correct that law enforcement officials have to make judgement calls on reports all the time. However, they are specifically prohibited from doing so in certain kinds of reports.

                  For example, here in New York, any report of domestic violence must be taken as a fact and they are required to detain the person against whom the report is made even if the individual who complains recants. It’s not always fair and the arrest warranted or not proceeds in much the same manner that as Shoshana experienced.

                  The basis for this is called, “Exigent Circumstances” https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Exigent_circumstance_in_United_States_law

                  We are not party to what intelligence indicated regarding terrorist activity or possible plans – especially on the tenth anniversary of 9-11 that would scramble two F-16 fighter jets to escort the flight to Detroit. We also have this statement from FBI Detroit spokesperson Sandra Berchtold, “Due to the anniversary of Sept. 11, all precautions were taken, and any slight inconsistency was taken seriously,” Berchtold said. “The public would rather us err on the side of caution than not.”

                  The other passengers were reported to have been taken by bus to police headquarters, held and questioned. While we might suppose what they experienced we cannot say but it is standard procedure to suspect everyone until they are vetted and cleared and in all likelihood searched and/or scanned.

                  Reply
                  • Dan: what you are saying is all entirely defensible, on the presupposition that one must follow a law (procedure, or protocol) simply by virtue of existing. Police who enforced segregationist policies in the US South and elsewhere might have felt a similar queasiness even as they “did their duty”. So your argument ignores those occasions when civil disobedience becomes the moral necessity.

                    You are also ignoring what prompts people to make reports that then, under an interpretation of an exigent circumstance, must (indeed) be carried through to its grim conclusion. A demonstrable pattern of false positives and the skin color of US air travelers is not a dismissible pattern, and this instance might be in or out of that pattern factually, but it is definitely in the pattern circumstantially.

                    Basically, the point you are defending is a moot one. Very few people would disagree that “suspicious circumstances should be investigated” or “if a suspicious circumstance is reported, it should be investigated.” The issue, rather, is what criteria do we accept for someone reporting a suspicious circumstance? We can look at the kinds of circumstances where people reported something serious and it turned out to be accurate–such as the strange object found in a bathroom or other public place. So finding a suspicious package in an airplane bathroom would be a likely candidate. Where are the cases where a “suspicious person” turned out to be a suspicious person? I know of no cases, and the current evidence of this thread is that racial profiling is creating a red herring (and will serve as a way for terrorists to be more effective in being invisible–see the white Jihad Jane, etc).

                    When it becomes culturally acceptable–under whatever pretense–to take anyone’s informing in an uncritical way, then we are veering toward a socially dangerous situation. It creates circumstances where people can deliberately generate false positives in various ways and for various reasons (as some men have learned the hard way about domestic violence, the example you cite). At the very least, in cases of false positives, there should be or could be repercussions for the one making the false report. In fact, for domestic violence, if the police determine that someone has made a false accusation, then that person may be charged with making a false report. In that case also, the person making the report is already known to the one accused. In this case, there is no such confrontation or repercussions, but there should be.

                    You might say this would dissuade people from making reports. That’s as it should be. People should not feel free to indulge in their racist fantasies about their fellow travelers. Laypeople have no idea what “reasonable grounds” are and they can still err on the side of caution and also moderate their fear-driven imaginings by forcing themselves to a certain level of internal confidence that their report really, actually, does need to be made. Moreover, in the case of a false positive, such people should have to face the ones they accused–aside from the sense of justice in this, it is also an educating moment, as it teaches that person that their basis for suspecting this person (perhaps because of the color of their skin) was unjust. We should want, culturally, to dissuade false positives (reports that lead to false positives), although of course it is in the interests of the ruling powers to put us in a situation where a sense of helplessness or fear makes us have to call authorities to deal with situations. That’s the moment that critically, socially disempowers us, and puts us that much closer to trammeled civil liberties and a police state.

                    With your respect for the rule of law, I would think you would support an addition to the current procedure that supported the effective function of the rule of law, rather than the effective abuse of law that allows authoritative bodies to further erode civil rights under the color of authority and arguments about national security.

                    Reply
              • nonegiven

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Flying while brown does not constitute “Exigent Circumstance.”

                Reply
              • Sarah

                 /  September 15, 2011

                I think you answered your own argument quite effectively there: “Some REASONABLE basis”. Having dark skin or a foreign appearance is NOT a reasonable basis.

                Reply
              • Ron

                 /  October 19, 2011

                Sounds good except there was no reasonable argument to suspect their was danger.

                Reply
          • kay

             /  September 13, 2011

            I have to say that I agree with you Russ about the terrorists not winning because of this scenario and that this is a lesson about our system needing refinement. The protocol for dealing with such situation does not develop into a perfect system over night…not even over ten years. I am a flight attendant and I have a pretty good idea about how Shoshana’s situation manifested and to some extent I suspect she is correct… that she was included in the scenario because of the way she looks. Unfortunately, this is a result of the events ten years ago and of the intelligence that has been attained since then about how future attempts might be carried out. At this point, there is no better protocol than hypervigilance and that means that sometimes people are going to be held in suspicion until proven innocent. This is NOT meant to be the American way, but it is the best we’ve got for now to prevent another incident like the one ten years ago.

            I feel bad that Shoshana had to endure such humiliation and I hope that her experience helps people to understand that not everyone who may look like those men who orchestrated the horrific attacks in 2001 is a terrorist. I am certain, though, that she was included for another reason and that is the perceived suspicious behavior of her seatmates. In the end, these factors came together to create a situation that looked much like what might be the makings of a possible attack. Thankfully, as it turns out, the situation was completely innocent. Given that there was evidence of plans in the works for more attacks on this anniversary, I do not believe the actions taken in this instance were overdone. I am happy to know that the authorities treated Shoshana and her seat-partners with as much courtesy and respect as is possible in such a situation. In many other parts of the world, suspects are not treated as well.

            Reply
          • Jacqi

             /  September 13, 2011

            I so agree with you, Russ. If we had been more cautious 10 years ago, maybe the disaster would not have been so great. However, it is what is, and increased security is a making from the history of 9/11. I am sorry the writer was arrested, but in my book, better safe than sorry. Protocol is protocol. What is with people texting, tweeting, and talking nonstop on their cells, and computers when it is apparent that something is occurring. Could this have helped lead to the suspicions of the crew?

            Reply
          • Ann

             /  September 13, 2011

            You might be rational enough not to report people based on baseless suspicions, but not everyone is.

            Reply
          • jeanne

             /  September 13, 2011

            Survivor of 9/11 Tower 1: Your comment is SO well said, I too, would rather have this awful experience, because, yes, SOMETHING works…we remain safe from, most likely, hundreds of thwarted attempts at showing us we CAN be hurt!!

            Reply
            • Allison

               /  September 13, 2011

              Please provide citations to support your assertion that the violation of people’s Constitutional rights has resulted in “hundreds of thwarted attempts.”

              We cannot assume that these things are working to keep us safer. And even if they are, we are sacrificing ideals that are supposed to be “uniquely” American – freedom, justice, equality – for this nebulous and unproven safety.

              Reply
              • Brenda

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Studies show it has stopped nothing.
                Brenda

                Reply
              • Allison, you are a true wonder. Your arguments are sound a realistic. Keep up the verbal sparring…let’s start a petition to force repeal of the Patriot Act. I recently heard a story on NPR about a middle aged white guy video taping the Mall of America (where he lives) to send to family over seas…He was arrested, sat for hours in a secret cell under the building and now has an FBI file and police record. For taping a video of an American tourist destination in his town to send to family. Another guy was fired, and while the arguments counter his claim that he was fired for being a loud mouthed liberal, it doesn’t matter. He too has an FBI file and a police report with his name on it. I am angry. Just by writing something like this, we could end up in someone’s hot water. “The only thing to fear is fear itself.” We’ve let fear win and we’ve lost so much in the bargain.

                Reply
              • Yoko

                 /  September 14, 2011

                I agree with you 100%, Allison.

                Reply
              • I wholeheartedly agree. When did skin colour define someone’s ability to harm others? We are so quick to judge others based on appearances. Yet, we fail to realise that sometimes the threat lies within the people we think are harmless. The police, the military, etc. I am grateful for what they do to protect the safety of the people, but at what cost? Has it really come down to violating innocent people’s constitutional rights just for the sake of clarifying a rumour with unfounded evidence? We also fail to realise that we do as much harm to other countries as we are doing to OUR VERY OWN CITIZENS. Lets recap this whole war against terrorism: we falsely accused people and stripped them of their constitutional rights for the sake of national security. BUT who protects those who were violated both in our country and elsewhere? The numerous people who were murdered or raped as a result of this war on terrorism. WHERE IS THEIR JUSTICE? Are they not people as well? Just because they don’t our constitutional rights doesn’t mean we should treat them any less than we expect for ourselves and families. I do support the underlying concept of security, but have we really let ourselves go to paranoia and fear? Before we act, we should act on solid evidence or at least pieces of solid evidence and not rumours before determining someone is a terrorist.

                Reply
              • Tom Triumph

                 /  September 14, 2011

                How was the Constitution violated? When one goes through security at the airport you are told a what the rules were. Someone accuses you and the police hold you so they can check it out. Holding someone for a limited period of time does not violate the Constitution. It sucks being held, and the fellow passenger might be an idiot, but the officers did their job without bias or abuse and you were writing about it the next day.

                It just bothers me that people jump so fast in assuming this when shitty stuff happens. We want people to use common sense, but, to be honest, that leads to bias and old boy networks and stereotyping because our common sense is based on experience (often limited). A rule of law treats everyone the same, so the author wasn’t left to rot or treated poorly because she’s “one of them”. Instead, she was investigated and released the same day. The Constitution, and the officers’ following it, got her through quickly and without incident.

                Reply
                • David

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Well said Tom. As she speaks of being pulled out because of the way she looks , she claims it to be because of the way she looks. Yet because the officers detaining her look to be the “REDNECK TYPE” she speaks of hating everything that might be Redneckish. If she wants for everyone to love each other then maybe should also live by the rule. I feel bad for what has happen to the young lady, but if you dont want the sterotype thinking to go on then start by living with no hate youreself.

                  Reply
                • Sheep Hurrdurr

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  You need probable cause to arrest.

                  But that’s besides the point, because these people weren’t arrested. They were held without charges. If you can tell me what charges they were arrested under, feel free, because even they don’t know.

                  Strip/cavity searches, racial profiling, arrest without charges… all of these are “bias and abuse”. “A rule of law treats everyone the same”, so yes, I think it’s safe to say America doesn’t have a rule of law.

                  Reply
                • Christian Lyons

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Really, a strip and orifice search is not a type of abuse? Come on. Her background check and interview should have precluded a strip/orifice search. How humiliating for this poor woman. I think she’s being rather kind in her blog. If it were me being falsely accused and strip/orifice searched, I think I’d be a lot more upset than this. If this were an elderly white woman sitting next to two Indian guys, I doubt she would have been subjected to the same “process.” This is coming from a 46 year old white male and former flight attendant who was actually in flight during the terror attacks of 9/11.

                  Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Being strip and cavity searched because someone filed an unsubstantiated report of unspecified suspicious activity is not “without incident.” The Fourth Amendment restricts unreasonable searches and seizure. Ms. Shebshi’s experience, in my opinion, falls under that heading.

                  The problem here IS bias. Bias on the part of the unknown and uninvestigated fellow passenger who originally made the false accusation. Then, bias on the part of the authorities who took that false accusation at face value without determining whether the accusation had any merit to begin with.

                  Reply
                  • Of course, we have these regulations only because of the eight years of the GWBush administration. Now our society is being prodded into becoming suspicious of our fellow Americans instead of the powerful politicians who deserve to be scrutinized.

                    Reply
                • Show-me Skeptic

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Constitution not violated? Are you nuts? This woman was dragged off a plane, handcuffed, strip searched and detained. All she did was travel by air while dark-skinned — I guess in the modern-day U.S., that’s a crime! The Constitution was most assuredly violated, it guarantees that we wil be free from unreasonable searched and seizures. This strip search and this detwention (seizure) were blatantly unreasonable. Somebody needs to be fired over this.

                  Reply
                • rba8053

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Tom Triumph is completely correct. There was no violation of Civil Rights. She was not charged for anything due to her race. It does suck, but it is for the safety of everyone. Being a patriotic American and of Latino descent, if Mexico or any other Latin country did something as awful as the 9/11 attacks, I would be completely understanding of being searched on the anniversary of the attacks when I am traveling on the exact same method of the attack. I would not be whining or crying.

                  You have to look beyond yourself sometimes at what is best for the country, not just you. We have become so selfish, and the media portrays all these rights in an incorrect light. Just because you get pulled over for speeding and you are of color does not mean you were racially profiled. If we continue down this line of reasoning that everyone who is racially profiled and simply questioned (not even arrested or treated bad) has had their civil rights violated, law enforcement will be walking on egg shells around anyone of color, and violence and crime as well as actual terrorist attacks will become more prevalent and easy.

                  Thank you Shoshana for doing your American duty of answering the questions and cooperating with the authorities. It sucks you were detained in that fashion, but it was done properly and as a preventative measure on the anniversary of the worst terrorist attack. You should be proud to have been helpful in clearing it up, but without complaining.

                  Reply
                  • Irish

                     /  September 15, 2011

                    rba8053…
                    You must work for the Government! I have looked over your comments to many of the posters… Look away from the author being Arabic/Jewish. scrub her color from the picture. She was arrested, STRIP SEARCHED, SEXUALLY ASSAULTED (cavity searched), detained, and questioned without a warrant or probable cause.
                    YOU need to re-think your belief that the Constitution and further SCOTUS interpretations allow for this!
                    In the absence of known criminal behavior, not being informed of the charges against her, I think it is perfectly reasonable for the author to wonder if the reason she was being treated this way was because of her skin. Law abiding Americans deserve better than this!
                    YOU PERSONALLY should reflect on this situation! Re-think and re-read the 4th Amendment and the relevant SCOTUS decisions. Arabic, Latino, Irish, or Black; No AMERICAN should be treated this way!!
                    Shame on you for suggesting otherwise!

                    Reply
                  • Mike

                     /  September 15, 2011

                    Mr.Latino,
                    Will you be ok if you were racially profiled in Arizona for “looking like an illegal immigrant who jumped over the border with 13 kids”. How about searching you for machetes and suspected of being a radical member of “La Raza” groups.

                    Reply
                • J.D.

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  This case is a clear-cut violation of constitutional rights. Yes, in cases of imminent & credible national security threats, our “normal” rights may be stepped on in that greater interest. However, there clearly was not a credible threat here. To take the major step of strip searching someone is a HUGE violation of privacy rights. It’s one thing to pull someone off of a plane, pat them down, question them, even check their background through reports. It’s a completely different thing to strip search someone. And, by the way, caselaw does not consider 6 hours to be a “limited period of time” when that time involves holding one’s urination and being subjected to a strip search. If you don’t understand how describing a strip search to merely “suck” is not only offensive to the lady who endured it but also offensive to the Founding Fathers (one of their top priorities in the Constitution was to free citizens from unwarranted searches and seizures; check out the Federalist Papers & see how much of the discussion is dedicated to this one issue), why don’t you have a stranger jab his/her hands in every hole of your body as you stand hoping that the camera nearby has not recorded the ordeal. Oh, and be sure to try to hold you pee while you do it.

                  J.D.

                  Reply
                • Can't Stand Idiots

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Actually, being held is a “seizure” under the Constitution, and is not allowed “without probable cause.” There was absolutely NO probable cause for seizing Shoshana, let alone the other two gentlemen whose only “crime” was to use the restroom coincidentally at the same time. The U.S. Supreme Court has already held that portions of the Patriot Act ARE unconstitutional. Our founding forefathers must be spinning in their graves.

                  Reply
                  • zirjo

                     /  September 15, 2011

                    Yessssssssss..that is my opinion such a free country???
                    While China and Russia are becoming more tolerant of their people..we are going the other way..

                    Reply
                • Irish

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  Tom, break out your copy of the constitution… Well, with comments like these, you might have not seen it except for that week you saw it in your high school studies. *sigh* The constitution and the Bill of rights was trampled on during this. You are free to move about the country feeling secure that your person, papers, and home will not be subjected to search or seizure without a warrant being issued upon a sworn affidavit from your accuser. No arrest can be made without charges described in the warrant.
                  Terms like “Exigent Circumstances” are being thrown around here and it saddens me. No one was in imminent danger that was observed by the arresting authority, so that is out… “officer safety” was in no doubt secured with the pat down after they got off the plane, so a “Terry stop” was all that was needed here. There was no evidence of probable cause found in their seats, on their person, or in the bathrooms by officers, Flight attendants, or passengers.
                  Further detention, searching, strip searching, and questioning without a warrant would be unconstitutional…
                  An informed, educated and aware population would have never let America slip this far from the path…

                  Reply
              • Authority

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Allison, there have not been hundreds, there have been so much more. There is nothing to quote because the “authorities” do not make every attempt public. Just like they don’t make every murder, rape, etc. public either. Don’t you think they know how much more fear that would cause? If you would like proof, go to the nearest police station and ask to see their stats. Then imagine that throughout every city in every state around the country. You seem intelligent. Do not assume you know everything and do not assume everything is made public.

                Reply
                • Holly

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Actually, they do make every murder, rape, and every other crime committed in the U.S. public. They have to. All crimes investigated, all arrests made, and all court documents are public record. In certain crimes, names of victims are not reported in the news to attempt to protect those victims, and juveniles are not generally named because they aren’t of age or being tried as adults. Just because people don’t pay attention to the reports, or because it’s not front page news, does not mean all criminial activity is not public record. The problem with what happened to the author and many others who are detained is that detention is not an arrest. It is not public record because there is no real paperwork inovolved if they aren’t actually arrested. The authorities, whichever variety of authority they are, can detain anyone they like, for any “suspicious” behavior, real or imagined. That is where our laws fail us as citizens. We have allowed our country to become, over many years, so afraid that many Americans feel it is worth giving up some of their rights to feel “protected.” There is no measure that will fully protect you from all the dangers you can imagine and all that exist if your government and its agencies are among those dangers.

                  Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  If there have been hundreds, then surely someone can provide at least a few examples.

                  Reply
                  • Flying is not a right. If you don’t agree to the security procedures, then stop complaining and drive.

                    As for what Authority said, he is absolutely right. The government has stopped many terrorist plots, (such as the Seattle Recruiting Station shooters, or the Times Square bombing plot), doing what they are doing now. There are many more that none of us know about. Its a dirty job, but I’d rather be patted down in airport security than be on a plane thats going to crash into a building.

                    Again, flying isn’t a right. Its a privilege. Drive if you want to complain.

                    Reply
                    • SilenceDogood

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      @ BB 9/14, 2011 at 4:35 pm

                      Actually, flying is a right. It is a guaranteed and enumerated right in the US Code. You can read it right here, in fact:

                      USC 49 § 40103. SOVEREIGNTY AND USE OF AIRSPACE:

                      (2) A citizen of the United States has a public right of transit through the navigable airspace.

                      http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/usc_sec_49_00040103—-000-.html

                      Perhaps you can point the rest of us to the conflicting law? Didn’t think so.

                      And to your other points, the Seattle Recruiting Station shooters were, like many others, people who were given money, plots, and weapons BY the FBI so that the FBI could trot up a terrorism charge.

                      Times Square Bomber? Not actually thwarted at all. Merely incompetent. And the boys and girls at TSA actually allowed him to board a plane due to their own gross incompetence.

                      If there are so many more cases like the ones you cited, well, then yeah, Allison is right, there are NO future attacks being thwarted. NOT ONE.

                    • Ron

                       /  October 19, 2011

                      No thanks. I will fly and complain until the wrongs are righted. I’m sure none of your examples involved evidence as weak as two men going to the restroom at the same time.

                • Jeanine

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  ‘Authority’ you seem to have a problem understanding the concept of democracy and civil rights. Our government (of which these hapless TSA and FBI morons are a sorry part)–IS REQUIRED TO PROVIDE ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY. I do not know ‘everything’ but I do know the difference between JUSTICE and FASCISM. Like far too many public officials you would have us ‘shut up and obey.’ To you I would say if you like dictatorships then move to Saudi.

                  Reply
              • Lane Yarbrough

                 /  September 14, 2011

                She does state “most likely”….no citation needed.

                Reply
                • David Alison

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  And the three brown people on the airplane sitting together are “most likely” terrorists. Unsubstantiated facts are so helpful.

                  Reply
              • Anne

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Excellent response. I personally have to endure “pat-downs” each and everytime I fly as I have a prosthetic hip. I am blonde and blue-eyed, smiling and friendly toward all TSA, yet I am subjected to being handled, literally, before getting on any flight. No one will ever convince me that this makes anyone on the plane I am about to board any safer. It’s smoke and mirrors. I have no recourse….if I want to fly, I MUST allow this. Yes, America is a changed country since 9/11, but as several have already said, refinement in our techniques to identify credible threats is necessary as we find case after case of non-common-sensical searches occurring. Blanket approaches to solving most any problem in life rarely work well. We are Americans. We are suppose to be free to pursue life, liberty and happiness. I am tired of the unspoken idea that I may be a criminal because my body causes a machine to beep. It’s a machine, and I am a human being, deserving rights afforded to me by my Maker. The US Constitution affords me rights as a citizen. When will someone come along that has the insight to see where the line is to be drawn in order to provide security for all of us, and detect with some degree of certainty the people who would attempt to destroy our peace of mind?

                Reply
              • Joe Jericho

                 /  September 14, 2011

                He can’t provide the example. TSA hasn’t found one terrorist since it was created and hasn’t thwarted one thing. Sure, the found the underwear bomber – after the fact, and it wasn’t TSA who actually found him. I am sympathetic with those who survived the Towers going down. My Aunt and Uncle have lived in Manhattan for 40 years and my Uncle was running through a subway tunnel getting away from the fallen towers. But, if someone was in the tower that day and got out, I will give them a pass on any comment they make regarding this. It’s just too personal for them. I’m sure some of these people probably wanted to nuke Afghanistan, etc. You just gotta let it pass.

                Reply
              • Dan from NYC

                 /  September 14, 2011

                I am not being contentious when I ask you to state specifically, which constitutional rights were violated?

                Reply
                • zirjo

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  what kind of question is this>>?? what school did you go to? where were you born?How old are you? 12?

                  Reply
            • You say we remain safe because of things like this happening. When has there been any threat thwarted because of an unsubstantiated report of “suspicious” activity? There have been threats averted because of diligent work by government officials, but all I see with these overreactive paranoid people is them apologizing in the end and basically saying “No hard feelings.” Then people who don’t have dark skin say they would gladly go through the situation if it meant they were safer. Wow, maybe that’s because the worse you will ever go through is a pat down! And you think THAT is humiliating! Just take the time to imagine being carted off in handcuffs and thrown into jail, even though you have done NOTHING and ARE AN AMERICAN CITIZEN! Even though this story was publicized, there are still people out there who 1-think maybe she did do something, or 2-at the very least she delayed whatever they were doing that day and incomvenienced THEM. But, hey, no harm, no foul, right?

              Reply
              • The truth is, being in a criminal justice program and sitting through classes on public administration, not every single “unsubstantiated report of “suspicious” activity” is looked into, but in situations where the country is on max alert because of threats from Al Qaeda (Starr, Ahlers, Jansen, 2011) then the common belief throughout the government is some people should have to sacrifice their rights if a suspicious act is perceived. I would normally strongly disagree with people having to sacrifice their rights but if there is already a perceived credible threat it changes things. In this case the report cam from the crew (Elizabeth Chuck), and was most likely perceived because it came from the crew as viable enough of a report to react to. I’m sorry that Hebshi and the two Indian men felt violated but i would like to think that if I was in the same situation I would accept it, but that might just be because I am biased and want to go into a government job after graduation.

                http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44501310/ns/us_news-security/?GT1=43001

                http://articles.cnn.com/2011-09-09/us/terrorism.threat_1_al-qaeda-cells-raid-on-osama-bin-plot?_s=PM:US

                Reply
                • That the report came from the flight crew (a point I suggested was more credible up above before I read this post) doesn’t change the analysis of the situation, except that it shows the training of flight crews needs some tweaking.

                  The fear people express about being secretly accused has to be factored in with any fear of terrorist attacks. For the author of this post, informing not terrorism was the source of terror. It is reassuring, in one way, that it was a flight crew person who made the report, because one can assume that flight crews have a much, much better idea of what suspicious activity might look like on a plane, although that doesn’t make them immune to racism or tendencies to racially profile, etc. So the only material change that this piece of information introduces is that it demonstrates that official bodies may be likely (and probably should be likely) to respond more to “more qualified reports”. If official bodies respond to someone who is right 98% of the time, that reduces false positives
                  tremendously, as opposed to leaving it up to fear-riddled passengers who are, literally, just guessing.

                  This doesn’t address issues of racial profiling, etc., but it points to a way to have workably enhanced surveillance (which is not the same thing as saying greater safety) without subjecting people to what turns out to be unnecessary unpleasantness. I hope that no one has lost sight of the fact that the author has, by these acts against her, been subjected to terrorism. It is an act of terrorism (State-sponsored) for authoritarian bodies to subject someone to this treatment (in my book, even if they’re guilty). It is a display of force that leaves an impression, quite apart from whatever excuses or justifications we (or anyone) wants to offer about necessary security and whatnot. That is, it may be security AND it is terror at the same time. It is terror that extends to her children, as a story, to her friends, as an experience she relates. It comes with anger as well, of course, but the perfectly rational response “I won’t fly on 9/11 anymore” belies the traces of violence done to this woman.

                  I propose in the case of all false positives that the accuser minimally should have to be confronted by the accused. Anonymous reporting cannot be allowed in cases of what turn out to be false positives. People should know when they make mistakes, and if those mistakes are racially motivated (then they’re not mistakes, but acts of terror themselves), then being shamed for those mistakes is not inappropriate.

                  I propo

                  Reply
            • Jeanine

               /  September 14, 2011

              Jeanne and ‘survivor of 9/11 tower 1: RELINQUISHING YOUR RIGHTS TO DIGNITY AND DUE PROCESS DOES NOT MAKE YOU SAFE. IT ONLY MAKES YOU A TARGET FOR FASCISTS. I suspect that neither one of you looks like the targeted racial groups. You would rather live in a ‘safe’ prison’ than a free society? 9/11 was horrendous, but it was a sneak attack. There is no rational way to be 1005 ‘safe.’ All we can do is use some reasonable awareness. As for ‘survivor of tower 1′: how do we know you are who you say you are? You could just as likely be a troll working for the RACIST BIGOTS IN THE FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT. THE TRUE TRAITORS ARE THE AUTHORS OF THESE LAWS–PATRIOT AND SO ON. NOTICE HOW NOBODY PROFILES WHITE CHRISTIAN MALES AFTER TIMOTHY MCVEIGH MURDERED HUNDREDS. Frankly, Jeanne, your prejudice and blindness to privilege is showing.

              Reply
            • Benjamin Franklin

               /  September 14, 2011

              You suck, Jeanne. You want a different America (maybe one like Russia or China) — one that lives in fear and without liberty. You need to evolve. Now, you sounds just like a non-thinking animal.

              Reply
            • marc

               /  September 14, 2011

              Think of the northern civil rights campaigners of the 60′s. Going south for a cause. Now consider your own perspective. How safe does your government need to make you feel? Not everybody can have their courage but everybody needs some.

              Reply
          • Carol

             /  September 13, 2011

            I feel badly that this has happened to you because of your skin color.
            Unfortunately, people profile all the time. It can be ecause of skin color, or speech accent, or because they are fat. My friend is constantly looked down on because he doesn’t have a “job” and he is Native American. He is a very well known artist but that doesn’t seem to ‘count’. I am overweight and I am profiled constantly. Everyone, even doctors, have a tendency to think people become fat because of over eating In my case, it is because my body does not make enough Human Growth Hormone. I can’t fix it because athletes and others have abused it so there is no insurance company anywhere that will cover the high cost. I think we are all at fault because of our fears, our hate and our inability to trust.

            Reply
            • walt

               /  September 13, 2011

              Does this suggest that only people of color can be terrorist?

              Reply
            • Allison

               /  September 13, 2011

              The fact that “people profile all the time” doesn’t always result in a strip search and cavity search and the violations of Constitutional rights that resulted in THIS case of profiling.

              Reply
              • Joe

                 /  September 13, 2011

                Allison, I agree with your comments 100%. Today a friend of mine wrote on facebook that her prosthetic breast was swabed for explosives. My doctore explained to me that he will never go through the x-ray machines if he is selected for an enhanced search. He explained to me that exposure to radiation is cumulative and back scatter x-rays are more dangerous than a regular x-ray of your arm or lungs because those x-rays are pinpointed. Back Scatter x-rays do exactly that, they scatter radiation all over your body. With all of the negative publicity, you would think that the police would use some common sense in the way that they conducted themselves. What happend to this lady was outragious. Thanks again for your comments Allison

                Reply
              • julianna

                 /  September 14, 2011

                This was not a violation of her constitutional rights. As a travelor in the post 9/11 world we live in, we all have the right to be safe. If you don’t like what is happening, drive to your destination. I am so tired of people complaining about civil liberties being violated. If the authorities didn’t act on the tip or even if it was just someone profiling, and there was an explosion or another accident, we all would have been screaming that they didn’t do enough to thwart another attack. You can’t have it both ways. I say profile away. As an American you must understand this…period!!! We didn’t do this to ourselves…those cowards on 9/11/2001 did this. We just have to try and make sure it doesn’t happen again and if that means some blogger from Ohio ….some Father from Virginia…..Some grandmother from Florida…some child from California gets profiled and detained…so be it. This country can not handle another attack and neither can I!!!

                Reply
                • we all have the right to be safe.

                  No. No, we don’t. “Being safe” is not a right. And if “being safe” is that important to you, then I trust you don’t drive a car (thousands of people die EACH! YEAR!), or send your child to public school (since so many teachers are being convicted of molesting children). And I’m sure you don’t buy food from the grocery store, with all the reports of e. coli contamination that happen every year.

                  You may be tired of people “whining” about their civil liberties being violated; I’m tired of people using Orwell as a social blueprint.

                  You may be unable to “handle” another such attack on US soil; but if so that’s not my problem. There have been attacks on US soil before, and there will be again, at some point. I will point out, thou9.gh, that at some point between 9/11/01 and that next attack, you’re probably going to be dead.

                  Heart attack, cancer, car wreck, falling down the stairs, an allergic reaction to some medication, maybe even a spider bite. Drowning, perhaps. All of these things are MUCH more likely to happen to you than another 9/11 type event occurring. If the government can’t keep you “safe” from the first seven items on that list, what makes you think they can keep you “safe” from an event that is statistically so astronomically rare as a terrorist bombing in this country?

                  Reply
                  • SilenceDogood

                     /  September 16, 2011

                    All excellent points, though these people aren’t interested in facts. They’re terrified of their own shadows.

                    As strega42 points out, car accidents are far more deadly than 9/11!.

                    In fact, there is the equivalent of 9/11! every month on America’s streets. If 9/11! is so scary, then yeah, you should stop driving, too.

                    Reply
                • Julianna:

                  Actually, for someone who doesn’t want another 9/11, you are committing a micro-version of it in this post. Your words are an attempt to terrorize, to suggest that my civil rights should be violated, removed. You say I must understand this–or else? Is that it?

                  I’m smart enough, or reflective enough, to know that if I spend every day living in fear, then every day of my life is screwed-off. I’d rather be scared at those times when I need to be. I was sitting in a cafe one day, and this guy came in, and I had a very strong, visceral reaction that I needed to be somewhere else. I didn’t “report him” I just left, feeling ridiculous that I was, but also knowing I’d feel even more ridiculous if I stayed and something happened. I checked later–nothing had happened. This was probably not my finest hour, but I don’t spend all of my time being paranoid about people–that’s just dumb to do to myself.

                  Your words frightten me. Your words are the kind that countries I wouldn’t want to live in encourage and promote. If I was elsewhere, I could inform on you as a terrorist, and you would be swept away. Case closed. Problem solved. It’s tempting of course. It’s such an easy way to deal with “people we are scared by”–but is that where we really want to live? Do you? The more reasonable response, of course, is to call for your censorship, but that’s just the same thing–a more polite, gentler kind of death. Is that what you want?

                  When people say, “If you have a problem with this country, go somewhere else,” my response is, “My problem is with you. You go somewhere else.” If you are going to stump for US values and the defense of the US, then please at least don’t violate those values in what you want. The very fact that your intemperate remarks will not and should not be taken as an input to the crafting of any security policy, though the fear and concern in your voice would be taken into account, is a testimony to what part of the US is good in how it functions. Racists want to lynch people of color; they’re generally ignored. Men want to beat women; they’re generally punished. You want a fascist government; no thanks. You will find friends in politics to back you up and who will try to implement what you want, but luckily most of them are just lying to you that that’s what they’re doing, and really they’re just making sure they can line their pockets more with moolah, using your terror to ensure their reelection and the income stream coming to them through the department of defense and the prison-industrial complex.

                  You’re not representing your own self-interests by being frightened like you are.

                  Reply
                • greg

                   /  February 12, 2013

                  @Julianna, I am happy (or sad) to say that NONE of the Founding Fathers would have ANY respect for you at all. None. They would regard you as just exactly the type of tool those who are corrupt and who seek power would welcome. Franklin himself would no doubt be contemptuous of your attitude…you are the epitome of the type of unamerican element that is going to ruin this great nation. If you want a police state and to disrespect the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence because you are too weak, too small minded, too self-centered to understand and appreciate what those documents mean to America, then move somewhere else and make room for a real American who will not betray everything the Founding Fathers created.

                  Reply
              • Joe Jericho

                 /  September 14, 2011

                This is right. The fact of the matter is that not everyone is awake yet. I guess it is ok to do this until it is done to you, a family member or a friend. I don’t roll like that. The Police State is violating all of our Constitutional rights, especially at the airport. While I realize that we don’t have the full plethora of rights that we get outside the airport, per Supreme Court jurisprudence, there is still no doubt that our 1st, 4th, 5th and 14th Amendment rights are being violated at times by certain people (TSA). I’d rather drive across the country at this point than subject myself to this kind of government intrusion in my life. I doubt that I politically agree with the blog owner about much. After all, she virtuously cited to Malcom X of all people. But still, I stand with her in her right to be free of this kind of government intrusion without more cause on the part of the government. Today it is her. Tomorrow, it is all of us.

                Reply
            • Every one seems to understand that being secure is not easy and a threat real or imagined on a day when the perpetraitors vowed to attack again must be acknowledged and dealt with period. It just so happened that the author of the blog fits the so called profile. They were all sitting together and not related or even familiar. Odd seat selection? Last thing, the fat Jada Pinkett remark hit two groups of people with one stone Blacks and overweight people. The buzz cut white guy who looked like the police another questionable description of human beings. If you don’t want to be
              subjected to discrimination and profiling find a better way to describe other human beings. I am not saying whether the reaction was appropriate? however the description of hardworking foot soldiers of American Security on 9/11 leaves a lot to think about.

              Reply
            • The speed of trust. We are unable to trust because so many lack integrity and honesty. In order to recieve trust one must first BE trust worthy. There in lies a large part of the world’s problem.

              Reply
            • Blanche

               /  September 14, 2011

              Carol: Your remark was timely as the author, herself, profiled the female uniformed officer as a “fat Jada Pinkett Smith”. I think she could have chosen another descriptive adjective but she chose a word that, as we all know, signifies contempt of an individual’s physical appearance, no matter what the reason. So, we should ALL be aware of how we treat others and the way we want to be treated and what we say. On the same note, what happened to her was reprehensible but African-Americans have been profiled for decades and experienced far, far worse (try lynching). I wonder how many times Ms. Shebshi experienced indignation when she saw other people of color experience events similar to her own and felt compelled to speak out? In no way are my comments meant to demean Ms. Shebshi. She is correct to speak out but please not to forget that there were many people before you right here in their own country who weren’t even allowed to express their righteous indignation the way Ms. Shebshi has.

              Reply
          • Russ, I congratulate you on they way you expressed your views if this situation and agree completely. I think Shoshana’s account of the situation was genuine, including the descriptions of the officers. I believe she was allowing herself to express, honestly, what she was thinking and feeling. It seems to me that America has still not come to grips with it’s ethnicity. We still hear of a crime and hope silently that the criminal can in no way be linked to us either by race, ethnicity or color. When we get to the point where it is okay to say (for descriptive purposes only) that a person of a particular ethnicity IS that ethnicity without it sounding racist, we will be on the road to evolution. When people try to describe me without using my ethnicity or race, it makes it quite difficult for someone to envision who I may be but as soon as someone says the [ethnicity/race] woman who was on the elevator, for example, there is a way to identify me accurately. In Shoshana’s instance, though, her “look” is neither her race nor ethnicity and that creates another problem for American racism. It seems that if you have dark, straight hair and light-brown skin, we Americans have not found an identifier for you yet. As this is America, THE melting pot, throw in long, silky, curly dark hair with dark-brown skin and we are once again befuddled.

            Homeland Security and the FBI did exactly as they should. They were respectful and thorough. I have been through the same type of search TWICE. once returning from Mexico and again returning from Canada, Because I’d done nothing wrong, I was not concerned.

            This a a way of life now and we need to accept it.

            Reply
            • Allison

               /  September 13, 2011

              No, we do not need to accept the random violation of a person’s Constitutional rights based on unsubstantiated reports of unspecified suspicious activity from untrained civilians who are not questions about the veracity of their suspicions.

              Reply
              • Susan

                 /  September 13, 2011

                Allison, there is nothing ‘random’ about flying on a plane on the the 10th anniversay of 9/11. And when somebody calls the authorities to report what they perceive as a threat, the authorities simply follow protocol. Flying on planes post- 9/11 is an inconvenience for everybody, unfortunately some more than others. That’s what happens when hijackers take over planes and kill THOUSANDS of innocent people!

                Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  Yes, there is. Not everyone can plan their travel plans in order to avoid a specific date. And you’ll notice that not every single person flying on 9/11 was handcuffed, detained, strip searched, cavity searched, and interrogated, which according to your logic they should have been, simply for flying on 9/11?

                  The protocol, in this case, is bullshit. An unknown and untrained civilian, operating under who knows what, can notify authorities of his or her “suspicions” of another passenger, and the authorities take that unsubstantiated report without investigating the validity of it? Really? So, if I call in a report to DSS that you’re beating your kids, the DSS authorities should take that report without asking me any questions about why I’m making it, what I’ve seen and witnessed, what I suspect, etc., and then yank your kids out of your home? Because that’s the equivalent of what happened here. And I really don’t think you want that.

                  Hijackers on 9/11/01 killed thousands of people. Ms. Shebshi is not related in any way to that event.

                  Reply
                  • Tina

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Maybe i’m wrong, but I don’t recall her mentioning a cavity search. A strip search is far different than a cavity search, just saying.

                    And yes, each and every claim of child abuse should be investigated, but the “equivalent” of this situation would be them coming to your home, asking you questions, looking through your house, looking on your child for bruises, seeing the claims were incorrect apologizing and leaving your home.

                    Having yourself detained for questioning isn’t the same as having a child ripped out of your home on unsubstantiated claims. And who said they DIDN’T ask the person these questions, and the person answered with specific examples describing her concerns? Two men leaving at the same time to use the bathroom (could be discussing a terrorist plot) the person sitting next to them ignoring everybody while texting on her phone (could be somebody contacting a person arranging the terrorist plot).

                    It’s hard to put yourself in somebodys shoes, but it’s very easy to judge them for the feelings they had and choices they made.

                    Reply
                    • Minuialear

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      The equivalent would be taking the children away for questioning (without explaining why they are being taken away), as well as doing a thorough search of your house, after which point they finally tell you that a neighbor said she heard you yelling and assumed there was some sort of abuse.

                      This incident wasn’t a friendly “We’re just going to ask you some questions” sort of affair. Police with machine guns marched into the plane, handcuffed three people, dragged them off to a detention center without a word about what was going on, left them locked up for hours, questioned them about everything under the sun, strip searched them, and then explained the situation. The fact that they even had the gall to ask if she spoke English when she’d been asking them what the deal was for hours was indicative of the sort of respect she was given AS A CITIZEN, and that ought to disgust anyone.

                      As for the claims themselves, I sincerely doubt those two men were the only men who used the bathroom in succession, and I sincerely doubt she was the only person texting or using her cellphone once the plane landed, so that is bullshit. This event reeks of racial profiling, and her treatment is inexcusable given the scant reasons for suspicion that were reported.

                    • “They also needed to make sure all my orifices were free and clear.” I guess you have a different definition of cavity then.

                    • nonegiven

                       /  September 15, 2011

                      ““equivalent” of this situation would be them coming to your home, asking you questions, looking through your house, looking on your child for bruises, seeing the claims were incorrect apologizing and leaving your home. ”

                      Wrong, if a social worker comes to your door wanting to investigate a report of child abuse, even accompanied by a uniformed police officer, you are not required to let them in, speak to them or let them speak to or inspect your children. You ask if they have a warrant or court order, if they don’t then you tell them to go away.

                  • Charls Martel

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    The validity of a report is verified in this manner. Tey could have also stormed the plane and shot the suspects, but that would be what you are describing. Your comment about DSS follows the same logic as the previous one.

                    The claim was made, the claim was verified.

                    By continuing with your logic we could say that only 100 percent verified claims are to be investigates or confronted? who is then responsable for the inital tip? can only a trained indevidual classify someone as suspicious and give a report to be followed up on?

                    thought problem: 3 personell on a plane have explosives hidden on their persons. a report was made as to these 3 suspicious indeviduals. how would this report be verified? any different from the above story?

                    On another vein, I am just curious as to what actions here violated someones rights?

                    Reply
                    • “The claim was made, the claim was verified.”

                      Incorrect. The claim was made, and then the claim was acted upon. It was not verified. That’s the problem.

                    • There really are people out there wondering whether and how a person’s rights were violated here? Our protagonist, a law-abiding citizen on the way to see her law-abiding husband, was detained for hours on an unsubstantiated decision and strip-searched. The Fourth Amendment says that you have the right to be guarded against unreasonable searches and seizures. How do you define “reasonable”? Does relying on the unfounded, unverified, unsubstantiated accusation of a random stranger who’s a bit racist and paranoid really strike you as “reasonable”?

                  • Duane

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Allison, I have to agree with you 100%. The simple fact is, the current “protocols” would not stop an intelligent, trained and determined terrorist anyway – maybe a crazed nutcase, but that’s about it. The “protocls” that existed on 9/11 SHOULD have stopped most of the hijackings then – but they didn’t. What was missing then is the same thing that is stil missing now – common sense. Without that, no protocol on Earth will work.

                    And personally speaking, certain of our rights are worth protecting with life and limb – which means that they are worth taking risks for. I would not want “perfect” security if it meant giving up my freedom. Inconvenience, sure. True freedom, no. When we do that out of fear, then the terrorists win.

                    Reply
                  • A realist

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Youre rational is very selfish. Although this poor woman and the two men had to go through this ordeal for what turned out to be no reason, safety is still important to the other civilians and US citizens on the plane. Our government and its the entities working for it are there to keep you, me, and this Lady safe from a real threat of death and terrorist actions. This is the world that we live in. We cannot just forget…to substantiate a claim now-a-days on a bomb threat is a 50-50 shot at suicide. Like it or not, this is the world we live in. This is the result of evil pockets of terror making life harder for all of us. Our world will never be as simple as you lay out in your comments. Our world is changed, and cooperation to prevent another 3000 deaths is a small sacrifice for the greater good.

                    Reply
                    • Allison

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Sacrificing somebody else’s Constitutional rights is not what I, or many people here, want as “the price of freedom.”

                    • Joe Jericho

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Realist, please tell me where the real threat of death was on that flight? I am sure you will be able to quickly articulate it. Or are you suggesting that there is a real threat of death everytime a plane takes off in this world? I will grant you that a plane can crash, but I can get in a crash pulling out of my driveway in the morning. Please explain yourself.

                    • Honestly your willingness to violate people for supposed protection is far more selfish than not wanting anyone to be violated for supposed protection. You’re a fool.

                • Joe

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  Susan,
                  We also have Inalienable rights as citizens of this great nation. We have 4th Amendment rights that guarantee us freedom from unreasonable search and seizure. What was done was a complete violation of this woman’s Constitutional Rights! I don’t remember the quote of Benjamin Franklin exactly, but it went something like this ‘Those who are willing to give up their Liberty for the sake of security deserve neither’. As long as we continue to have TSA, FBI and Police Officers who are abusing their power we have in fact ALLOWED the terrorists to win. By the way, I have spent the last 35 years of my life in Law Enforcement and I believe the manner that LE’s conducted themselves in this situation and many others is outragiously wrong.

                  Reply
                • Susan, do you mean to say, brown people should “deliberately” not fly on 9/11, because there flying cannot be perceived as random? Random work, random visit to somebody ailing, random visit to a wife or a girlfriend who was unlucky to be born on 9/11 years before the incident?

                  So much for The American Dream.

                  Reply
                • mac

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  The authorities were simply following protocol? Wasn’t this the defense the Nazi guards used when they rounded up Jews and sent them to the camps?

                  Reply
                  • Joe Jericho

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Yep. Same with the Communists in Stalinist Russia, Mao’s China, Fidel’s Cuba and Kim’s North Korea.

                    Reply
                • Anthony

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  I’d rather my plane explode than be subjected to this tyranny. Good thing I moved out of the fascist United States. I’m really worried about when I have to go back and visit my family. I won’t answer any questions, hold me in the cell. Government thug scumbags, the whole lot of them are.

                  Reply
                • SilenceDogood

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Look, Susan, it’s a dangerous world in this post-9/11 era. If you and thousands of others are so afraid to fly on 9/11, then you shouldn’t fly on 9/11. Simple as pie.

                  Reply
                • Dan from NYC

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Well said Susan!

                  Reply
              • I support Rationality

                 /  September 14, 2011

                I agree with Allison. We do not have to accept violations of our rights. Rational minds need to prevail. I’m sick of hearing the old “if I didn’t do anything wrong I don’t have to be afraid” argument. What if Shoshana had been with her kids? What if she was on her way to visit her dying father? A six-hour or more delay with no cause is not harmless. This is America. We prize our freedom.

                Reply
            • Jim

               /  September 13, 2011

              America doesn’t have “an ethnicity”. We are a melting pot of people from all over the world. We are a nation of immigrants and natives, people of all nations who have come here to make their lives. The concept that someone thinks we have “an american ethnicity” is so repugnant that it’s not even funny. Shoshana, I for one, as a fellow American Citizen, apologize to you for what you suffered. You handled it with much more dignity than I would have. You prove that in spite of ourselves, America has hope. Thank you for that.

              Reply
            • Shelly very well said!

              Reply
            • Marnie

               /  September 14, 2011

              If we accepted that unfair and inhumane treatment by anyone or towards anyone – including the government – was inevitable, we’d still be in the 1700′s. Don’t you have any sense of pride in the essence of what it means to be American, with not only the right, but the duty to stand up and speak out against injustices? Complacency and laziness is the antithesis of the American Dream, and will lead to the rotting of our way of life from the inside out – a situation many times worse than what anyone else can do to us, but exactly what they wish they could do. But in that case, they haven’t won – we forfeited. Truly, ignorance is not bliss – it is a path to destruction.

              We need to figure out a way to rise above these issues that separate us, and unite as citizens, to fight for the values that this country was built upon, and has struggled to achieve for so many years. We need to speak up, and make our voices heard. We need to stop allowing the politicians to run our country on their own personal platforms, and really start taking back our power.

              Shoshana, I am so sorry that you endured this treatment… I can only hope that you can find the strength and love in your heart to forgive – for your own peace of mind – and that your story might be able to make a difference, inspiring more people to stand up and speak out for the freedoms we obviously need to take more responsibility for maintaining, lest we lose them while we’re not looking.

              Thank you for opening yourself up like this, and sharing your story.

              Reply
            • You can go through life as someone who allows government to infringe upon your constitutional rights by simply saying this is a “way of life” and we need to accept if you like. However, that kind of attitude will take us down a road towards tyranny, and I would not want to see that.

              No, the FBI and Homeland Security did not do exactly as they should. They were acting upon policies that are based on fear and ignorance and do nothing to further protect us. This is no different than TSA agents groping an 85 year old or even a young child.

              As Benjamin Franklin said – “They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary security deserve neither liberty nor safety.”

              Reply
            • Dave in SB

               /  September 14, 2011

              Shelly Are you #@*&ing kidding??? This is a way of life now?? Accept it?? Our founding fathers felt that a free people were not meant to be subject to this kind of arbitrary crap and that is a great part what made this country great, in the first place. Sadly, people like you are handing over our rights and freedoms, for your illusory sense of safety, such that someday we will just have fond memories of the freedoms our founding fathers gave us through the Constitution!!!

              Reply
            • ruth

               /  September 18, 2011

              Shelly – I don’t have to accept anyone sticking their fingers in my vagina and butthole because of another person’s unfounded suspicions. No, I surely do not. It’s a violation and our Constitution protects against it for better reasons than the current fear. It does nothing in this case to ensure national security. What it does is set a precedent for those with some type of authority to do it to you because someone reported something “suspicious.” And eventually that person making a report could be your neighbor that has a petty disagreement with you and goes extreme or someone who just disagrees with your political beliefs. I’ve already had this type of situation occur with me post-9/11 and Patriot Act, and no, it did nothing to further your security or anyone else’s. But it did a whole lot to violate my sense of personal security and safety, which is what is seems to have done in this case.

              Reply
          • Thomas Hamilton

             /  September 13, 2011

            I agree, the system needs to be fine tone, but i rather have to go through a slight inconvenienced than to have 50 to 60,000 people lose their lives,because the system was being politically correct —–we are at WAR.

            Reply
            • Allison

               /  September 13, 2011

              What Mrs. Shebshi experienced was not a slight inconvenience. It was a gross violation of her Constitutional rights. War does not suspend those rights for American citizens.

              Reply
              • Charls Martel

                 /  September 14, 2011

                What Constitutional right was violated?

                Reply
                • rad

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  All of the 4th amendment, some of the 5th amendment, and much of the 6th amendment. Since you asked.

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Bill_of_Rights

                  Reply
                • Eric Blair

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Charls,
                  I think that there is a right to protection from unlawful search and seizure, which is the basis for the requirement for probable cause. It looks to me like this is the chief violation of Mrs. Shebshi’s liberties.

                  Reply
                • Joe Jericho

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Quite easily the 4th Amendment. Unlawful seizure and unreasonable search. Geez. As for Hamilton, I agree with Allison a strip search and a possible cavity search was not a slight inconvenience to her. This just speaks to the self-centered nature of our society. Maybe your real thought is “F her”. ????

                  Reply
                • J Rodman

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  We are protected against search and seizure, unless there is resonable suspicion of a crime.

                  In this case, there was not.

                  Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Her right to be free of unreasonable searches and seizure, and her right to have her detention based on probable cause (see Constitution, U.S., Fourth Amendment).

                  In addition, her right to face her accuser (see Constitution, U.S., Sixth Amendment, Confrontation Clause).

                  Reply
                  • Lance

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Keep slapping them down, Allison…

                    Reply
                  • I support Rationality

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Allison, hardly worth it to argue with some of these people who clearly did not pass their high school government class.

                    Reply
                  • Due to the Patriot Act and our post 9/11 world, her search and seizure was not “unreasonable”. There was probable cause. It was 9/11, and there was chatter of a chance that terrorists would retaliate. DHS and FBI followed procedure, which was given to them in the PATRIOT ACT.

                    Also, the 6th Amendment only applies in criminal defendants. She was not charged with any crime. She was not accused of being a terrorist. She was detained and questioned due to what people deemed suspicious activity on a day where there was a threat of terrorism.

                    Reply
                    • SilenceDogood

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      And the probably cause was what, exactly? It was either a) that she is brown or b) she is brown and was sitting in a row with other brown people or c) she is brown and was sitting in a row with other brown people who also used the restroom.

                      Egads! I had no idea that terrorists also use the restroom! Well, I for one will now be reporting everyone I see on a plane using a restroom. Can’t be too careful, you know. After all it is a post 9/11 world and people using the restroom need to be strip searched!

                      Seriously, BB, if you are this afraid of 9/11 attacks, you just shouldn’t leave your house. Seriously. You are more likely to choke and die on a peanut than you are to encounter a terrorist event.

                    • Allison

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Although the Patriot Act has definitely changed the applications of the Constitution (detrimentally), there was no probable cause. Sitting on an airplane while being non-white is not probable cause.

                  • Dan from NYC

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Allison, et. al. – The law is very clear and nobody’s rights were violated.

                    The fourth amendment was not violated in that the report presented “exigent circumstance” that made the search legally valid.

                    The fifth amendment was also not violated in that no one was “held to answer” a term with very specific meaning referring. I quote, “A preliminary hearing is held to determine if there is sufficient evidence that the defendant committed the crime and should therefore be “held over” for trial. Once a defendant is “held to answer,” meaning in custody to answer charges, the prosecuting agency files a document called the Information. The defendant will subsequently be arraigned on the Information at which time he or she will enter a plea and proceed to trial.” http://definitions.uslegal.com/h/held-to-answer/

                    The sixth amendment was never at risk as it has to do exclusively with criminal prosecutions and rights at trial. Since no one was “held over”, and no indictment was issued, it is an inaccurate understanding to state there is a right to face the accuser. Such a “right” doesn’t exist.

                    Reply
              • Brian

                 /  September 14, 2011

                You talk to much. It’s not a “right” to fly. If you do, you follow the rules which are in place to make it as safe as possible. If you don’t like it, take the bus. And yes, it is sorry to say, that sometimes the color of someone’s skin causes more alarm than someone’s else skin color, but once again, deal with it. If you don’t like it, then move some place else where you feel safer. I would have reported it too. As a matter of fact I would have been on high alert for anything, anything at all which might seem a little odd. Including everytime you reached into your bag while they were in the bathroom.

                Reply
                • Brian, she did follow all of the rules – as did the other passengers. Since when is sitting in your seat, reading and sleeping considered not “following rules”. You’re an idiot.

                  Reply
                • SilenceDogood

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Um, no, try again.

                  Flying is a right.

                  USC 49 § 40103. SOVEREIGNTY AND USE OF AIRSPACE

                  (2) A citizen of the United States has a public right of transit through the navigable airspace.

                  http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/usc_sec_49_00040103—-000-.html

                  If you need to feel safe, then YOU need to move to a country that provides for your safety. Cuba and North Korea come to mind.

                  Reply
                  • Dan from NYC

                     /  September 15, 2011

                    As with all rights there is a limitation. Flying is a limited right not an unlimited one. Reading the law you posted above clearly states in part, “(b) Use of Airspace.—
                    (1) The Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration shall develop plans and policy for the use of the navigable airspace and assign by regulation or order the use of the airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient use of airspace. The Administrator may modify or revoke an assignment when required in the public interest.
                    (2) The Administrator shall prescribe air traffic regulations on the flight of aircraft (including regulations on safe altitudes) for—
                    (A) navigating, protecting, and identifying aircraft;
                    (B) protecting individuals and property on the ground; “

                    Reply
                    • SilenceDogood

                       /  September 15, 2011

                      And just exactly how is strip and cavity searching someone AFTER the plane has landed SAFELY at its INTENDED FINAL DESTINATION allow for protection of individuals and property on the ground when the flight was safely completed as intended?

                      How, exactly, does that work with your incorrect reading of the law?

                • BayAreaBiker

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  Another bigot comment. It would have saved rest of us if you have posted your real picture with your comment too so that I could avoid sitting next to you if we happen to be on same flight or at the airport.

                  Reply
                • anonymous

                   /  September 18, 2011

                  And you’re an ignorant, semi-literate authoritarian buffoon who probably tells women IRL that they “talk too much,” too.

                  Reply
            • Mark

               /  September 14, 2011

              No, Thomas Hamilton… nobody should have to go through a “slight inconvenience” just because we are bombing the hell out of the Middle East. It’s not worth it. It starts with 1 person being inconvenienced, then 2, then 10, then 1,000, then 100,000 then we are putting people of certain ethnic background into camps. Fascism will come to America wrapped in an American flag. You need to foresee the bigger picture when you say things like that, Thomas.

              Not one person should ever have to go through what Ms.Shebshi went through.

              Reply
            • James Jesse

               /  September 14, 2011

              A slight inconvenience? Wow…

              The usual.. ‘It is OK as long as it does not happen to me’

              Reply
            • David

               /  September 14, 2011

              Are we really at WAR? We’ve been battling a war on drugs for over 40 years and spent over $2.5 trillion dollars on it, yet have drugs been eliminated from our society? Not even remotely.

              We’ve been fighting a war on terror for ten years now. Terrorism existed before that time and it will continue to exist into the future. Our individual freedoms and liberty are being compromised for the sake of fighting this war. At what point do we say “enough”?

              Using the “we are at WAR” excuse is a convenient way to justify virtually any attack on the personal liberties that we in the US hold so dear in the first place. Whether it’s illegal wire tapping, unlawful detention or progressively unreasonable searches, we as a people are letting our freedoms erode in the interest of safety.

              And just for some perspective, bask in these numbers. From 1994 to 2010 here are the number of people killed in the US from two different sources:

              Terrorists: 3,168 (94% on 9/11/01)
              Traffic Accidents: 661,403

              Maybe we need a good old fashioned war on traffic next?

              Reply
            • Libby

               /  September 18, 2011

              War has not been declared.

              Reply
          • Donna

             /  September 13, 2011

            Russ – Why did so many good people die on 09/11, and an idiot like you survive??

            Reply
            • Why is it necessary to resort to this type of name-calling when Russ asked for a middle ground, a fine tuning of a system that makes mistakes? I was annoyed to remove the knitted booties off of my 3 month old child at airport security, and would also like to see this system fine-tuned.

              Reply
            • Cheri

               /  September 14, 2011

              Donna ~ name calling only shows your ignorance. It’s not at all becoming. It is certainly your right to disagree with someone else’s viewpoint; however, your behavior of name calling has no benefit at all and simply makes you look and sound ignorant.

              Reply
            • Dave

               /  September 14, 2011

              so he could be insulted by an idiot like you

              Reply
            • Ken

               /  September 14, 2011

              What an unworthy comment.

              Reply
            • Marnie

               /  September 14, 2011

              Come on now, Donna… That is truly dangerous language, and even more un-American than anything he said. We each have the freedom to maintain, and voice our opinions; and frankly, this comment indicates to me that you are not only probably less intelligent than he, but also morally deficient. Congratulations!

              Reply
            • Donna…perhaps you’ll want to re-read what “Russ” wrote…just sayin’!

              Reply
            • Donna, that was a pretty nasty comment. He didn’t say anything wrong, just his opinion, and all you have is slander.
              As far as what happened, do I think she was violated and humiliated? Absolutely! But the catch 22 is unfortunately, if you see something that looks a bit odd and it is a day where everyone is especially on guard, do you tell yourself to let it go, with the possibility it might a real threat, or do you go for help? I do believe there was a better way to handle this and allay fears without putting this poor woman and those other 2 men in handcuffs, but I don’t have the answer as to how.
              To those that claim there was nothing suspicious about those men going to the bathroom, you weren’t there, and you can only really see this story from her perspective. It might have looked odd to the crew for two men, sitting close together, and of the same ethnicity to get up and go to the bathroom at the same time and then take a bit longer than normal. The fact is we had warnings of the original 9/11 and we ignored them. Well people aren’t ignoring it anymore. There were other indicators of possible attacks on the anniversary, should we ignore those too?
              We are the only country with the kind of freedoms that we have, and we shouldn’t let others change that or cause us to turn on each other, but the other side is that because we have these freedoms, we are also a very easy target. So how do we balance this, so we maintain our American ways, respect our rights, and still be protected? It is a very difficult balancing act. I was in the military during 9/11 and was an Arabic linguist/analyst and it was very difficult then to make good decisions. It is a very convoluted situation. Who attacked us on 9/11?…extremists who happened to be of Arab descent. So who do we look at to attack us again…those of Arab descent. Are there other terrorists of other nationalities? Of course there are, and we should always be alert, but the fact is that there was not a single terrorist attacker on 9/11 who was not an Arab.
              Please understand, I am not saying anyone was wrong, I feel for this poor woman, but I also understand why things happened as they did. Instead of simply saying that people acted inappropriately, find answers on how to better handle this. Pointing the finger is a waste of time and doesn’t get to the heart of the problem. To Mrs Hebshi, I am so sorry that you were put through that. I can’t imagine what you must be feeling and I hope that you can find some peace.

              Reply
            • Appalled

               /  September 14, 2011

              How dare you! That comment makes me sick to my stomach. Way to reinforce the idea that we shouldn’t be judging each other.

              Reply
            • wri7913

               /  September 14, 2011

              Donna,

              Your comment only shows how vulgar and idiotic you are. Nothing more. As Russ said, and I concur, I am glad there is a system in place to report incidences but obviously it does need to be refined. People also need to be vigilant but not overactive in their fears. People like Shoshana need to be more aware of their activities especially on a day like 9/11 while flying. People’s fears will obviously be heightened due to possible followup terrorists strike. It hasn’t happened yet but the Press was making references to the Government’s heightened state of alert due to a possible strike.

              Are people of Arabic descent going to be profiled on planes? You bet. People of Arabic descent do have a long recent history (in the last 50 years) of airline terrorism. Sorry but that is the honest truth here.

              Reply
              • Allison

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Timothy McVeigh was white. Are white people being profiled when they rent moving vans? Most people who bomb abortion clinics and shoot abortion doctors are white. Should we profile them?

                Membership in an ethnic group does not equate to being a terrorist.

                Reply
              • wri7913 says, “People like Shoshana need to be more aware of their activities especially on a day like 9/11 while flying.”

                Who exactly are “people like Shoshana?” Women? Ohio residents? People who are half Arab? People who are half Jewish? What if you’re 1/4 something? 1/8? What if you’re 100% Indian and the only thing you have in common with Shoshana is that you’re not white?

                And what exactly were her activities? Reading? What can and can’t she read? Sleeping? What if I can never sleep on a plane? Playing with her phone? Are some games ok but others not? Texting while on the ground – can I do that if I’m brown even if the captain says it’s ok to turn on cell phones? How many white people around me need to be using electronic equipment before I can feel it’s safe to use mine?

                Shoshana a regular American person and she wasn’t doing anything!

                Reply
              • Tony S

                 /  September 14, 2011

                wri7913,

                I think that you and others are missing/ignoring some important points.

                First, while there needs to be a way to report suspicious activities, the response to such a report should be a reasonable one. What Mrs. Shebshi, and her two fellow travelers were subjected to was not reasonable.

                Second, please remember that our Constitution is the foundation and the framework for all of our laws, If those laws fail to protect all of our people, then we have a problem that needs to be addressed. As Allison pointed out earlier, the 4th Amendment was probably violated. Mrs. Shebshi was forcibly detained and restrained based on someone reporting “suspicious activity”, Does anyone remember the major details of the Salem witch trials? Women were tortured and killed based upon the accusation that they were a witch. Before I get accused of missing the obvious, I would like to point out the basic parallels. It only took an accusation to have someone detained (ie, locked up) before trial. During that waiting period, the accused were thoroughly interrogated (tortured) before their trial to try to extract a confession. Failing that, the accused was sent before a judge who did one of two things. He either ordered the accused be tested, such as being bound and thrown into a large enough body of water, or, if the testimony were convincing enough, the judge would order the accused to be executed. I’m not going to beat this one to death, I’ll leave it to you to find the parallels.

                While I understand and accept the need for investigating reports like this, there are many other ways to respond. Especially that whole ordeal about the strip search! Someone posted that the blog posting said nothing about a body cavity search, and how it was completely different than a strip search. My question, why would you perform a strip search if not to perform a body cavity search?

                Last, airport security didn’t suddenly appear following the events on 9-11. Beginning in the ’70s, there were several hijacking’s of commercial airlines with the intent of monetary/political gain. It was following those incidents that airport security became an issue that mattered to the general public. In addition to this, terrorists began a bloody campaign (mostly in Europe) of random killings to bring attention to whatever cause they were supposedly supporting.

                Eventually, the terrorists moved there attacks globally, including to the US. Did you know that there were several terrorists attacks on US soil by the Croatian nationalists prior to 9-11 or the breakup of Yugoslavia? They generally didn’t do much damage, but still, think you can racially profile them? To accuse people of Arabic descent of being responsible for 50 years of airline terrorism borders on being racist. Making these types of comments without first doing a bit of research doesn’t provide security, it only reinforces distrust and fear.

                We all need to stop the rhetoric and start thinking for ourselves. The Republicans aren’t going to save us, and neither will the Democrats. Demand real solutions from our elected officials, and stop demanding “security at all costs”. Not everyone that has dark skin is a terrorist, or sympathetic to terrorists, or, from another country.

                We need to stop being afraid.

                Reply
            • Joe Jericho

               /  September 14, 2011

              Yeah, I don’t support this comment either. The worst thing that can happen to us (and it already has) is that we turn on each other. Meanwhile, the rulers laugh. Sad.

              Reply
          • It seems curious to me that many of the people advocating the stricter searches and diminishing liberties in the name of more security are white.

            What about the people actually subjected to the searches?

            I wear a turban. I went to the Mall of America the other day with my mother and sister. I went to see a movie, and two police officers pulled me from the theater. They questioned me. Apparently they received multiple calls from people frightened by me in the mall, and had been following me for a few hours.

            Who’s really shouldering the cost of this “increased security”?

            By the way, over the past decade, the number of deaths worldwide at the hands of Islamic Extremists, outside war zones, comes to some 200 to 300 individuals per year. For comparison, during the same period more people – 320 individuals per year – drowned in bathtubs in the United States alone. Attributed to a friend.

            Reply
            • Sarah

               /  September 13, 2011

              “Over the past decade, the number of deaths worldwide at the hands of Islamic Extremists, outside war zones, comes to some 200 to 300 individuals per year.”

              “Attributed to a friend.”

              Really now. How many people died in the 9/11 attacks? Misinformation isn’t just Fox New’s specialty.

              Reply
              • Ketil

                 /  September 14, 2011

                According to http://danger.mongabay.com/injury_death.htm
                341 persons drowned in bath-tubs in 2000.

                Including 9/11, roughly 3000 people have been killed the last decade in islamist attacks in the US, according to http://www.thereligionofpeace.com/Pages/AmericanAttacks.htm

                So, bathtubs have in the last decade slightly more dangerous to the American public than islamist terrorism. In addition to the erosion of civil liberties and public relations, the war on terror has cost trillions of dollars and hundreds of thousands of lives, mostly civilians. What resources are being used in to preserve bathing security?

                Reply
                • Sarah cannot bring herself down to respond to you as you have now provided some corroboration. Of course, she would never have bothered to check, if there is a grain of fact in the post she responded to either. She will conveniently ignore the thread from hereon.

                  Reply
              • Do you know what the phrase “statistical anomaly” means?

                Reply
              • That average includes 9/11/01 numbers.

                Reply
              • Oh, Sarah… you’ve totally missed Sukhvir150′s point, haven’t you?

                Reply
                • SilenceDogood

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Well, people afraid of their own shadows do tend to miss the obvious.

                  Reply
            • Cheri

               /  September 14, 2011

              Why is it that the “race” card always has to be pulled with every situation? That get’s real old and in most situations has NOTHING to do with the issue.

              Reply
            • Tony

               /  September 14, 2011

              I agree with you 100% It`s always the non-colored people to huff and puff about everything that`s not happening to them and think they know what everyone feels when they do not.

              Reply
          • Citizen

             /  September 13, 2011

            He who gives up freedom for safety deserves neither

            Reply
          • SANKAR

             /  September 13, 2011

            Are you white? If a white guy points a finger to the dark skinned person especially at the airport or inside an aircraft it will ring the bell all over. If you belong to that race then you would know it. It is not for protection. It is sheer racism intended to divide the people through intimidation. The major reason is to inject fear in the mind of citizens so that all will stay silent although being wiped out due to depression created by the bank racketeers. The biggest terrorism of the century. At this day, terrorism is just a joke but the crooks are still attempting to revive it by spreading fears. Obviously, it is a huge profit making business.

            Reply
            • Cheri

               /  September 14, 2011

              Oh please…. get over it.

              Reply
              • Mike

                 /  September 15, 2011

                Can you get over your white privilege. People like you are never ever inconvenienced. So how would you know. Now go back to watching soap operas

                Reply
            • eye on the ball

               /  September 16, 2011

              SPOT ON! Three cheers for being the first commenter to point this out. Counterterrorism is a MASSIVELY profitable business and it is absolutely in the best interests of many to perpetuate our fears. And it DOES distract us from real abuses carried out by other industries, including profiteering in the financial industry, to keep Americans focused on “Homeland Security” instead of investigating banking crimes.

              Do people not remember what “Give me liberty or give me death” means? It means our “founding fathers” would rather have been DEAD that be subjected to the kind of treatment this poor woman describes in her blog post. So to every “patriotic” person who says this treatment is “worth it” in exchange for the “safety” it brings to America – they need to realize they are in total conflict with the brave people, real patriots, who fought a revolution to bring us this country, and everyone else since them who has fought for civil liberties.

              Reply
          • Dave

             /  September 14, 2011

            Although I agree that it sucks to have to go through this type of thing, I lean toward the fact that it is way better to be safe than sorry. If one has not awakened to the fact that our world is a dangerous place after what happened on 9/11 then one must be asleep at the switch. We, as Americans, have a group of animals out there that care not for their own lives but instead care about how many of us they can kill. All it takes is one of them to get through security and people will die, that is why it is important for all of us to be vigilent and aware of what goes on around us. This is what the person or persons were doing when they reported suspicious activity onboard that aircraft. The sad fact is that the majority of Americans cannot tell the difference between someone from India as opposed to someone from Saudi Arabia. Right after 9/11 there was a murder of a sikh man because the guy who shot him thought he was an arab. Americans should be educating themselves about the different peoples living in the middle east/southwest asia so that they can make more informed decisions in their vigilence. That vigilence is a necessary evil that we must live with because we are at war with an ideology.

            Reply
          • Paul

             /  September 14, 2011

            Refining the methods that keep us safe should include being informed why you’re being detained. No one should answer any questions if they don’t know why they are being asked.

            Reply
          • Renee

             /  September 14, 2011

            Russ I totally agree with you. Although I feel that the behavior for suspicion wasn’t there, I do find comfort that in the event a real threat was presented it would be investigated. I agree that she was treated unfairly. However, 10 years ago some suspicions were ignored. And unfortunately we all have to live with the consequences.

            Reply
          • I have to agree with Russ.

            Questioning you would not eliminate the threat if there was one. It was our inaction of on 9/11 that caused the outcome, and now because the FBI is being cautious we are going to fault them as well. Where do you purpose the middle ground lays here, Without all the accusations and conjuncture of profiling, what would be a better solution? Simply questioning you, if you were a terrorist, I am sure you would be completely honest and forthright in your confession as soon as someone pulled you out of line.

            I have to question anyone’s decision to fly on 9/11, especially since several planes are being escorted by fighter jets, that could misread a sign of trouble mechanically with a terrorism attack and end up badly.

            Is it racist or bigoted, the case and point could be made either way. If the police suspect me of a felony in another state but have not confirmed that fact, they have a time frame as to which they can hold me in a cell and be lawful.

            So let’s do what you suggest, Let’s grab some white guys and yank them off the plane, Why? We don’t have a good reason, we just don’t want everyone to feel like we are singling them out unfairly so we will waste resources and money on a group or people that pose no credible threat right now.

            Perhaps it was racist, but like everything in life it is not all or nothing, the blame lies with you just as much as it does with the FBI. Your decision to fly on 9/11 being of a certain race, doesn’t show sound judgment. If not for any other reason but then being target practice for a pilot.

            Reply
            • Johnathane Dorane

               /  September 15, 2011

              Thanks for your post Tina. Now I completely understand that it is entirely the victims fault. She should have known that because of her genetic heritage she would not be able to fly on 9/11/2011 without being detained for several hours and strip searched.

              Are you one of the people who believe that rape would not be a problem if girls stayed out of bad neighborhoods?

              Your solution is to grab white people of the plane and subject them to the same treatment, even though you state “We don’t have a good reason”. Please clarify what the “good reason” was for treating these three people this way. For reference, I will not accept “Your decision to fly on 9/11 being of a certain race” as a “good reason”.

              I hope that this case goes to court, because I want to see the justification for detaining, strip searching, and questioning three innocent airline passengers. If this is not determined to be a gross violation of the fourth amendment, then nothing will.

              Reply
          • It’s not a result of terrorism alone. The fear that caused someone to report “suspicious activity” was bred over the next eight years after 9/11, heightened not by terrorist actions but by people in our own homeland. The paranoia of people was selectively targeted, used, and aggravated by political maneuvers, which has left a lot of people with ugly fears about dark-skinned people, particularly of Middle Eastern descent. These people are too simple to have any measure of self-awareness necessary to combat these bigoted ideas–they’re like rats in an electrified cage, and they do what they’re told, whether they’re being told that African-Americans have to go to school with them or whether they’re being told that possible Muslims should be watched carefully in case they’re terrorists. So no, the terrorists didn’t cause all of this alone; a bunch of opportunists did the greatest amount of damage inside our own borders.

            Shoshana–if I can presume to call you by your first name, not knowing you :) –I’m terribly sorry that this happened to you, and I’m terribly glad that you decided to write about it. Information and expression are freedoms we need to cherish.

            Reply
          • Dave Mowers

             /  September 15, 2011

            Perhaps the United States should stop training terrorists and supporting dictatorships in foreign countries then we wouldn’t have people who want to attack us! What was the excuse for shooting the Iraqi family with eight children to death including a newborn and two toddlers, recently brought under investigation? You think their extended family loves America now? Do the relatives of the Latin American people murdered by U.S. supported dictators love our country? Do parents of children dying from cancer caused by depleted uranium in Iraq love us? When your government murders in your name you get terrorist atrocities in return, maybe we should be asking ourselves why it is happening instead of arguing about the reactions to it.

            Reply
          • ‘Inconvenienced’ and ‘humiliated’?? She was given a body cavity search! Why don’t you volunteer for one after being dragged of a plane and handcuffed and come back and tell us us “at least there are efforts…to keep us safe”. Puhlease.

            Reply
          • George Metesky

             /  September 16, 2011

            This is completely disgusting. Please accept my apologies on behalf of my lunatic government (and the crazy people in Detroit who did this to you). On Sept. 9th, I was visiting New York City and Penn Station looked like it had been invaded by an attacking army…only it was our own police, in every nook of the station with loaded AK-47s ready to fire on anyone suspicious. I watched one brutish cop flip out on an obviously drunk Hispanic man just because he was speaking loudly and obnoxiously (imagine that, in New York City!). Personally, I would rather live in a country where we suffer a terrorist attack every once in a while than in a perfectly safe country where power is abused the way it is currently being done. And this is with a liberal, minority-member President. Just imagine what would happen if we had elected someone scarier and more militaristic?

            Reply
            • While I agree that this is completely disgusting the rest is shortsighted and incorrect. You DO live in a country that suffers terrorist attacks every day. You just don’t see them because they are masked as attacks on our information infrastructure. And they don’t directly cause the loss of life – they threaten to expose the security infrastructure that your tax dollars pay to maintain.

              Fly into most any international airport in Europe, or go to a major train station and it’s very commonplace to see the military all over the place. You and anyone else who enjoys the ability to walk freely with little expectation of death and destruction should be thanking those military personnel for deciding to take on this charge on their own. Last I heard there was no draft forcing them to!

              And I highly doubt that you really mean you would tolerate a terrorist attack with loss of life occasionally. It would likely take only one bomb going off in your neighborhood, frightening the bejeebeez out of you, or the death of a loved one or friend someplace else to change your opinion.

              Reply
              • SilenceDogood

                 /  September 16, 2011

                The difference, though, is that those military personnel in Europe aren’t itching for a fight the way the undertrained local police are goaded into it by DHS.

                The hysteria in this country is seriously over the top.

                Reply
                • You don’t think they are? Seriously? And you know this because… they handed you a flower and chanted the last time you were in Europe? Military presence in major European transportation centers are part of their culture. I saw it as far back as my first trip to England in 1980!

                  Further, I’d disagree with you about itching for a fight. The very highly trained military people I know aren’t interested in shooting people on their own soil. But they will if provoked. That’s what they are trained and sworn to do: Defend us from enemy’s foreign and domestic.

                  The cause of this incident wasn’t started by the military. It seems it was a civilian who provided the faulty Intelligence that scrambled jets and caused strip searches. The military simply responded just like they were trained.

                  Again, I’m sorry and saddened that this happened to her and her seat partners. But if you want to point a finger and find fault, point at the radicals that aren’t interested in building anything – but only tearing things apart at any cost. And then at the highly under-trained “official reporters” who stir themselves into hysteria. If we were living in a hysterical society, we’d have curfews and be walking around with flak jackets.

                  And lastly, if this was a trained Air Marshall or some other military individual on board that evaluated this situation and made the decision to move forward with this threat, then they need serious retraining – and maybe a new job.

                  Reply
                  • SilenceDogood

                     /  September 16, 2011

                    We’re saying the same things. My point is that having military and militarized police infesting our cities is dangerous. There is no need for it. Period.

                    Reply
                    • We’re not saying the same thing. You assume that a police force is ill equipped/trained to protect the law abiding citizens it’s charged to protect. I’d counter and tell you that a very high percentage of these individuals are former military, and are incredibly well trained. And for the most part well lead. In fact, I’m related to two highly trained soldiers-turned-police officers who put their life on the line every day. Are there bad apples out there? You bet. But there are bad apples everywhere. Bernie Madoff comes to mind…

                      It’s not perfect, but I’ll take this imperfect government over all the rest.

                    • SilenceDogood

                       /  September 16, 2011

                      Bollocks.

                      A well-trained force with bad apples strip and cavity searches innocent people. They also accidentally shoot people once in a while.

                      There is a reason Rome forbade a standing military, and wouldn’t let it parade in the city. When a militarized police force is allowed to occupy a city, it doesn’t matter how many wonderful people are in the force, it is a force occupying a city. That’s why when Caeser brought a triumphant military through the city the Senate was appalled. They knew what it meant. It meant the end of a free Republic.

                      That is a recipe for disaster.

                    • There was no reply button – so this is the best I could do!

                      SilenceDogood
                      September 16, 2011 at 3:48 pm
                      Bollocks.

                      A well-trained force with bad apples strip and cavity searches innocent people. They also accidentally shoot people once in a while.

                      There is a reason Rome forbade a standing military, and wouldn’t let it parade in the city. When a militarized police force is allowed to occupy a city, it doesn’t matter how many wonderful people are in the force, it is a force occupying a city. That’s why when Caeser brought a triumphant military through the city the Senate was appalled. They knew what it meant. It meant the end of a free Republic.

                      That is a recipe for disaster.
                      _____________________________________________
                      The British-English influence surfaces! Now I get it!

                      Yes, I concede that accidentally strip searching someone is less deadly that accidentally shooting people once in a while. But neither is acceptable.

                      So let’s learn a bit from history, shall we? Caeser marched on the city, the Senate was appaled. It was a civil war. Ceaser wanted control, and the senate fled. Is our military at war with our Senate? I don’t think so. And didn’t we fight that battle some years ago? Something about Union and Confederate? Hmmm?

          • Brian

             /  September 16, 2011

            Shame you didn’t go down in the tower, Russ – the home of the brave, you subhuman piece of shit.

            Reply
        • Agreed. Just yesterday, someone on my Facebook list left a vitriolic comment regarding Muslims. He just cannot grasp the difference between Islam and what the radical fundamentalists believed in. It saddens and frightens me that ten years later, we’re still stuck in this rut.

          Reply
        • Mel

           /  September 13, 2011

          I do feel pity for you if your actually innoccent, but I am glad extreme measures were used. No offense, but if most of us had it our way, every single middle eastern person would be deported from Canada and the US. Sorry, but amongst the innocent are the terrorists and we just cant tell you apart and thats what they count on.

          Reply
          • ruth

             /  September 18, 2011

            Yuck. I reject your sentiment. Don’t speak for “most of us.” You are in your own body and mind, not others. Speak for yourself. This comes from someone whose parent died doing research to decontaminate and demilitarize chemical and biological agents stockpiled for wars.

            Reply
        • Abbe Lakenville

           /  September 13, 2011

          I agree – and I blame the right wing “patriots” for letting, or perhaps one could say “helping”, the terrorists win.

          Reply
        • Theonlypatriothere

           /  September 13, 2011

          Let’s get real people. The good of the many outweigh the good of the few. It took what, 6 hours? It wasn’t pleasant I’m sure, but get over it people. Had there been a bomb, and had it gone off, you would all be screaming about how poorly our security teams did their jobs! Make no mistake people, THIS is the price of your safety. They took a small amount of your time, they did not harm you, and they did what the situation required. I can understand that a strip search is not exactly pleasant, but I promise, it won’t kill you. Everyone wants to reap the benifits of being a citizen but no one wants to pay the smallest of prices for it. You picked your representatives people, time to deal with it.

          Reply
        • stacie

           /  September 13, 2011

          ITS THE DAY AND AGE WE LIVE IN AND WE NEED TO DEAL WITH THE HAND WE WERE DEALT AND STOP BLAMING THE GOVERNMENT FOR TRYING TO PROTECT US! DEAL WITH !!!!!!! WITH A SMILE!!

          Reply
          • Allison

             /  September 13, 2011

            No, we do not need to accept the random violation of a person’s Constitutional rights based on unsubstantiated reports of unspecified suspicious activity from untrained civilians who are not questions about the veracity of their suspicions.

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            • Gump

               /  September 13, 2011

              Apparently you do. Fact is, Islamic extremists don’t fight war with any appropriate rules of engagement. They fight dirty and cowardly. They sneak around dressed as civilians to kill as many civilians as they can. They are the hardest form of war to fight, and the direct result of that is the difficulty of having to watch the public for signs of suspicious behavior. There are going to be mistakes. I’d much rather be detained knowing that the gov’t is making hard choices to try and keep the plane safe, then for them to avoid racial profiling at all costs because it’s “rude or politically incorrect”, and simply hope that people who come from countries with high terrorist activity won’t do it again.

              You don’t have proof that they actually stopped you because of your race, it’s just the way you feel because you’re sensitive to it. If I was living in China, and a bunch of white catholic extremists killed 3000 random Chinese people in a day for no other reason than hate, I would be very cognoscente of the fact that I look like them, and would personally go out of my way to make sure they understood I was not the same. I certainly wouldn’t act all high and mighty and exclaim, “How dare they!” I’d actually feel apologetic and feel embarrassed that people from where I come from have such audacity and ugliness. Just as I do for my ancestors in the time of American slavery. I think you need to stop blaming the U.S. for racial profiling and blame the Islamic extremists for creating this result. There is no other way to fight back and defend against this kind of war.

              I’ve been stopped and searched on a random airport check, and was thankful when they were done, appreciating that they make sure I get on a safe flight. I’m happy to be searched, I’m happy to take off my shoes, and I thank them each and every time. Get on board.

              Reply
              • Allison

                 /  September 13, 2011

                Being stopped and searched on an airport check is not the same thing as being taken off of a plane in handcuffs in front of the rest of the passengers, placed in a dirty cell for several hours with no information, strip searched, cavity searched, and interrogated. If you would be fine with that, so what? Others wouldn’t, and that is not only their right, it’s the law under the Constitution of the U.S. That document that is the owner’s manual of the country.

                Dark-skinned American citizens do not owe anything to white Americans just because they exist. Dark-skinned Americans have the same rights as white Americans, and do not have to kowtow to white American fears.

                Reply
                • Cheri

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Allison, did this happen to YOU? You really need to get over it. Our world is what WE have made it through our self-absorbed attitudes and ungodly living. We get what we deserve… Actually, thank God, we don’t get what we deserve…for it is a lot worse than anything described within these posts.

                  Reply
                • Jan H

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Allison, I totally agree with everything you’ve posted.

                  I keep wondering if they ever asked for her Driver’s License – you know, before they threw her in a cell.

                  Reply
                • David

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  If i remember correctly there where americans killed on 9/11. Why do you have to have dark skin to feal what everyone is talking? I am a white male who listens to country music and could be called a “REDNECK”.. Does this mean i hate all non-whites? No it doesnt, but the stero-type is that i do. Please dont tell me that because you have a skin color that is not white you should be treated any different than anyone else. This is a case where protocol was used. Sadly what happen on 9/11 didnt not have the proper protocol followed or the planes would have never been hijacked. For all that havent noticed the man who has picked the people to run Home Land Security isnt white.

                  Reply
                • Kwame

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Allison, I just want to say that you are a hero in this comments section. Every uninformed remark that I have been sufficiently moved to reply to, you have already done so eloquently. Thank you and I laud your passion.

                  For the record, I’m not an American citizen, not resident in the US, but love the principles your country has been founded on. Pity to see what it has become.

                  Reply
              • Anne

                 /  September 13, 2011

                By “stopped and searched” do you mean that you were handcuffed, detained, and made to wait to in a dirty cell for hours at time while no one would tell you what was going on or why you’d been pulled from your flight? No. You mean that you were pulled aside while going through security and they opened up your suitcase and looked through it, looked at your shoes, and then sent you on your merry way. You have no idea what this woman and those two men went through, and it’s stupid to compare the two and act like you know what she’s talking about.

                The ignorance of whoever reported them is astounding, but not surprising. What puts the icing on the cake for me, and I think for most of the other people here commenting is the fact that they were treated like common criminals based off of a tip from an untrained civilian who had nothing to support their claim other than, “They all look the same and two of them went to the bathroom close to the same time.” They could have at least told her what was going on, and why she’d been pulled from the plane instead of ignoring her, or refusing to tell her and treating her like a criminal. Telling her what’s going on doesn’t jeopardize anything, if she were a terrorist she’d already know what was going on anyway. They also didn’t have to pull them from the plane the way they did. There are better, less humiliating ways to do that. And if you want to defend it, then go pull me some stats about how many actual terrorists they pull off of planes every year. Show me how many times doing that to people has stopped an actual danger, instead of humiliating innocent people who happen to “look like a terrorist” to the ignorant and racist eye.

                Her experience was demoralizing, humiliating, and belittling, and until this has happened to you you should probably shut your maw.

                PS: I think it’s hysterical that you say that she has no proof that she was pulled because of her race. Please, oh wise one, tell me why else someone would assume that three people sitting next to each other doing nothing but sitting would look suspicious to someone. Oh yeah, and also happen to be the same race. That’s just a coincidence right? This happens to Caucasians as well all the time I bet.

                Reply
              • Gump, what skin colour are you, and did you also get strip & cavity searched

                Reply
              • Ed Simpson

                 /  September 14, 2011

                “”Gump” you are a real ass***e if you think this is occuring here in America, it is taking place in places where we Americans go with our terror in “eliminating terrorism.”

                Reply
              • Concerned US Citizen

                 /  September 14, 2011

                First off let me say I am appalled this happened. What a nightmare.

                The fact of the matter is, it is all bigotry and racial profiling. The extremists crashed into the towers because they hate Americans. My Japanese friends still get nasty remarks said to them in public. I know many people who hate all Germans due to Hitler. I am of Swedish descent and I dyed my hair black and due to this I got detained when I was picking someone up from the airport. I didn’t even get out of my car. Oh, and I was driving a black German car. Or maybe I got profiled because I was driving an expensive car and the poor slob who detained me will never see the inside of a car like mine unless he stops them out of some fabricated notion he has regarding why he stops people.

                It is all bigotry, pure and simple.

                Oh, and to Donna and her comment about Russ, “Russ – Why did so many good people die on 09/11, and an idiot like you survive??” Probably every person who died on that day would have Russ’ opinion now if they had survived. The fact is no one deserves to die because we don’t agree with their opinion. Chances are due to the enormous loss on 9/11, the dead did include some disagreeable people. They still didn’t deserve to die. You, Donna, making that comment because his opinion is different than yours is no different than any other person who exhibits hatred due to someone having a different opinion than yours or a different lifestyle, looks different, is of another religious belief, etc. 9/11 happened because those people placed all Americans in a stereotypical fishbowl and because they don’t agree with certain Americans. Racial profiling is exactly the same. Maybe these three people didn’t die, but they were tortured due to their ethnicity.

                All people need to learn more tolerance. Law enforcement need to remember “innocent until proven guilty” and “probable cause.” I hope whoever reported that suspicious activity realizes that 2 fighter jets shadowed their airliner all of the way to the airport. Maybe those reporting suspicious activity also need to be detained and checked out. Aren’t most witnesses to crimes checked to see what their motive is or checked for their credibility?

                Still shaking my head over this. Just so unbelievable.

                Reply
              • Duane

                 /  September 14, 2011

                We should not be so reactionary. So many posters on here currently support the “enhanced security protocols”, solely because of what happened on 9/11. I wonder what will happen the first time those protocols backfire, and result in a tragedy? Will everyone support them so much then, or will people want to go to the opposite extreme? What happened to common sense?

                In this case, the Airbus was being shadowed by two F-16′s. They weren’t there for a parade. If certain of the “protocls” had been breached, that Airbus would have been shot out of the sky. So, what if the planes would hav picked that exact time to experience a major electrical failure? What if the pilots would have needed to do a fly-by for a second approach? What if one of them, being nervous, would have accidentally shuyt down the IFF, made a poor choice in on-air jokes, or done one of the dozens of other major mistakes that happen daily in our skies? Sooner or later, our fear will result in exactly what it is trying to desperately to avoid – another tragedy. And, in the process, we will give up our Constitutional rights as well. That’s a poor trade, to me.

                There is a difference between inconvenience and violation of rights. The first we can live with, but not the second. We must keep our fear in balance, and regain some common sense.

                Reply
              • New yorker

                 /  September 14, 2011

                I couldn’t agree more she should be happy got was able to go home and see her family, those that perished on 9-11 didn’t make it home… Go back where your from and blame your own people…. Did it bother you that you were taken off plane well deal with it…it was better to be taken off a plane than to have been blown up and never see your family agian. Your people came and killed our family did you think that everything was going to be okay NO it’s not. What happened to you is nothing compared to what happened to those innocent people.

                Reply
                • “Your people came and killed our family” ? Are you kidding me? Did this lady personally do something to you? You’re nothing but a narrow-minded racist, and you should be ashamed of yourself.

                  Reply
                • What are you talking about “your people”? She is an American. She OUR people.

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                • Allison

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  She is back “where she came from.” She’s American. Her own people did not participate in 9/11. Blaming her for 9/11 just because she happens to share ethnicity with the people who flew the planes is racism, pure and simple. And in this case, SHE is the innocent one.

                  Reply
                  • avery

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    not so sure about that. Don’t know you….and based on your own bigoted and racist remarks (“fat”, “fat belly”, “rednecks”), I don’t care to.

                    You are very offensive.

                    And it’s likely most people here don’t ‘know you’ and what your real motivations are — a bored housewife trying to get blog hits (like a crack addict off a crack pipe?)….a homegrown terrorist (we’ve had our share of those, too – doesn’t matter if you are “American” or from mars)…what?

                    don’t know….don’t want to know. you were doing something on the plane you should not have been doing and don’t like the consequences so you are crying foul. It’s not a new phenomenon – - many people getting caught not obeying the rules do the same thing – - trying not to take responsibility for their OWN actions.

                    If you really want to teach your children something — teach them to be responsible for themselves and not blame their situation on a made-up fantasy such as “racism” — as your writings clearly show you are the racist.

                    And let it be known, plenty of people of ALL ethnic backgrounds have been shaken down by airport security. We just don’t whine about it.

                    Reply
                    • SilenceDogood

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Um, do you realize that Allison is not the author of this blog post, no?

                      I hope you really aren’t that stupid.

                    • Allison

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      For someone who professes not to want to know, and not to care, you took the time to post. That’s an odd way of showing your not caring.

                      Please link to examples of fliers being handcuffed, detained, strip searched, and interrogated that are of all ethnic backgrounds.

                • Another New Yorker

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  This is the dumbest comment I’ve read today. Good job, New yorker — you worthless piece of xenophobic shit.

                  Reply
                • Dina

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  New Yorker- You are a disgrace to the American people. People like you are the reason so many countries hate us.
                  Before you tell people to go back to where they are from- take some pride in where you are from and LEARN HOW TO PROPERLY SPEAK ENGLISH.
                  If you didn’t notice there have been approximately two insulting comments written, but none have offended me- an American- as much as yours has. There is a better way to make your point without demanding that someone – who is also an American, by the way- leave the country. “Her people” did not kill your family, as “her people” are not terrorists, the hijackers were.

                  Reply
                • Gideon V.

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  @new yorker “Your people”?! “Go back to where you’re from” Really?! What part of “her people” are you referring to? The Arabic or the Jewish part? Never mind, from your comments I gather that you don’t even realize there is a difference.
                  Man, if people would only read and educate themselves a little bit before making comments like yours, the world would be a better place for sure!

                  The most violent element in society is ignorance. ~Emma Goldman

                  Reply
                • BayAreaBiker

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Wow! I am just shocked at the level of your ignorance. Her family came and blew up your family? Which family are you talking about? The White family? or does it include all of Americans? I am sure you didn’t mean latter as then that would make Ms. Shebshi your family too.

                  Thanks for enlightening us with your bigoted remarks. But do you know that there were two other folks got “detained” who were actually from Indian descent and along with her, their rights were violated too. Last time I checked, none of the Indians were involved in ANY terrorist attacks against US. Do you have the same thing to say to them also?

                  Reply
                • “New Yorker” – she is home, and I wish there were more people like her in this country than those filled with hate and bigotry like yourself. Her experience 10 years ago on that day was the same as everyone else in America – sadness and disbelief. People of all races can and have done terrible things to others – to think that we can blindly make judgments about entire groups of people based on the actions of some is insane.

                  I find it incredible how so many people seem to think that they can compare experiences of being pulled aside and searched in line to what Ms. Hebshi had to experience.

                  Reply
                • Jen D

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Just a reminder, New Yorker, that Shosi is an American citizen – born and raised here. When you begin invoking “Your people” you cross the line. Her father was Saudi by birth, but lived here in the U.S. for the majority of his life. Her mother is an American. When you tell her to “go back where your (sic) from and blame your own people,” should she head back to Southern California? Seriously?

                  Reply
              • Fah

                 /  September 14, 2011

                How would you like authorities to racially profile a redneck like you for KKK suspicion ? Strip search you, put you in a cell, not allowing you any lawyer access.

                Reply
            • m.e.

               /  September 13, 2011

              You’re an idiot! How do we know they’re unsubstantiated until they’re checked out? DUH!!!

              Reply
          • “Listen, when I slap you you’ll take it and like it!” Humphrey Bogart – The Maltese Falcom (1941)

            Reply
          • What To Do?

             /  September 13, 2011

            Agreed Stacie!

            Reply
          • Tony

             /  September 14, 2011

            Keep believing that Stacie, the Gov`t don`t give a damn about the people. oh you are going to see in the next couple of years what they have planned for all of us, They have already started a National I.D. card with chips in it, putting cameras all over the country, putting chips in our bodies with all of our information on it, Making it very hard for people to attain passports, Locking the borders on both sides not to keep Mexicans and Canadians out but to keep everyone in keeping everyone who doesn`t think for themselves in fear. And for those of us who can see outside of the box and see what is really going on are called nut jobs, crazy and conspiracy theorist because we see and know what is really going on and choose not to go along with the rest of the Sheeple within the collective society of Idiots that easily fall prey to Manipulation.

            Reply
          • Joe Jericho

             /  September 14, 2011

            Stacie, did you say the same thing during the Bush administration? If you did not, you are a partisan hack. It’s ok for Obama to do it, but not Bush. There are people on the other side of the equation who would say that it was ok for Bush to do this but not Obama. It all makes me sick. IT ISN’T OK FOR EITHER ONE OF THEM TO DO THIS! Wake up.!

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          • Jeannie

             /  September 14, 2011

            Stacie,
            I could not disagree with you more. Citizens with this attitude helped, yes I do mean helped, the followers of Adolf Hitler commit some of the worst atrocities in the history of mankind. This is the same attitude that allowed the internment of American citizens of Japenese descent during WWII. It is NEVER ok to allow ANY abridgement to our constitutional rights, for ANY prupose. In this case there was an unreasonable search and this poor woman was incarcerated (liberty). I am sure that if I called your local police station and (without giving my name) told them that you had bomb making equipment hidden away and were planning an attack and they then removed you from your workplace in handcuffs, strip searched you, locked you in a cell for 4+ hours without allowing you any contact with the outside world, repeatedly questioned you and then let you go saying “No hard feelings” you would be filing a lawsuit within minutes of your release. This entire episode is merely an illustration of how much we have all allowed our Constitutional rights to be infringed upon in the name of “security”. We should all be outraged that we have allowed this to happen.

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        • Mae Vernon

           /  September 13, 2011

          I agree totally, Allison. If the non-radical Muslims would assist in investigating/capturing their “radical” brothers, I would not have the same feelings towards them.

          Reply
          • Allison

             /  September 13, 2011

            This seems…random, especially in light of the cooperation that U.S. armed forces have received in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan.

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            • Justin

               /  September 14, 2011

              As a U.S. Army Veteran who has personally deployed to these war zones you are misinformed if you believe there has been cooperation by these governments, or their people. The overwhelming majority of people in this region are raised and educated to hate Americans and Jews. This is a Fact! I understand your points of view and respect your tenacity in defending them. I do agree that these individuals were racially profiled and their rights were violated. Being half Hispanic I emphasize with them, and realize if I were one of the three in that row I might have been in a cell along with them. This being said I understand the actions that were taken. Although it is unfortunate, it is also naive to think that others with a law enforcement or military background what not have had the same suspicions in that circumstance. I can tell you from experience that they would have. It’s not politically correct and it’s a sobering and incovienent truth but profiling is a necessary and successful tool. This has been the case long before 9/11 and will continue to be the case after. When profiling becomes wrong is when the intent is skewed. They weren’t harassed simply because they were of ethnic decent. They fit a particular description on a particular day and happened to randomly commit an act that when compounded with all the factors did create reasonable suspicion. It’s no different than if a blond haired blue male robbed a bank the first 3 Fridays in a month, all similar males would be more scrutinized the 4th Friday. It’s unfortunate but reasonable. If these people would have been working together and had an explosive device, these posts would probably look a lot different as we thankfully honored this civilian for being observant and vigilant. We can have empathy for a person or group of people for an unfair situation but that doesn’t ultimately make the situation wrong. Let’s not blame the people trying to protect us. There is really only one group that deserves blame, The Terrorists….

              Reply
          • Yeah because all of us non-radical Muslims know who all the radical ones are and where they live and congregate, right?

            Reply
          • alytron

             /  September 14, 2011

            That is just insane. Truly nuts.

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        • Ron

           /  September 13, 2011

          Allison -
          Don’t know you, but read several of your comments here. I’m with you.

          My stance is as following:

          The US has several wars going on at the moment, we hear all the time about our men and women overseas protecting our freedoms. I say bullshit, I don’t think our freedom was ever threatened by these nations we’re at war with. Not to say that I don’t appreciate our military, I wish them the best, and they’re just doing what they’re told. But protecting our freedom at the moment, I don’t see it.

          That all said, protecting the freedoms of US citizens also falls upon the shoulders of ordinary US citizens, so when you see some situation no matter how offensive, like when the KKK wants to peacefully assemble, you need to support it. I hate those bastards, but I support their 1st amendment rights.

          I hope the blogger mounts a legal action and lets us know about it, I’ll certainly help support her. She definitely should’ve lawyered up but there is absolutely no reason, based on what I’ve read that they had probable cause to strip search her.

          And frankly, anyone that will trade their freedoms for security theater, deserves no freedom, freedom is a continuous fight, but it is mostly fought at home.

          -Ron

          Reply
        • Zoe

           /  September 14, 2011

          Do you really think that fear Americans have, is because of the terrorist destruction of the day 9/11? No The fear Americans have is rooted in the governments manipulation of the media. remember the daily color codes codes we had to deal with every day? These so called “Terror Alerts”, caused Americans to live in fear up to the illegal unjustified, oil driven invasion of Iraq. The sudden growth and expansion of an actual International American Empire, came to fruition from this galvanizing of the fear of the citizens of our USA. This is a sad fact and very true. The largest untapped oil fields in the world lie in Iraq and Iran. Does anyone really think the USA can survive without taking these lands, in the event of some shortage? NO. The answer is NO. So Bush and now Obama are protecting our oil interests abroad. Also noteworthy is the fact that Afghanistan has some the of the largest geological sources of rare earth materials, that are absolutely necessary for the manufacture of technology. Think we can do without those in a shortage? No absolutely NOT. This isn’t about justice or what is right. This is about hedging bets during a time of depleting resources and rising demand from the worlds increasing populations AND the need to protect a lifestyle that is dependent on these substances to survive. If oil and rare earth minerals and metals where to stop, we would be suddenly relegated to a lifestyle like that of colonial America, without the established skill sets. With an increased population, and a short supply of all energy producing material (including wood), complicated by the inability to transport, a very quick spiral into hunger and death would occur. This is the concern behind the invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq, This invasion is also to surround Iran and keep it in check, ready to pounce if need be: eg; nukes, need oil. The profiling and nabbing of people here in the states is to keep the populace divided, afraid and submissive. I do not believe this is right. But I do know that this is what is happening. I believe their are other ways to get along, peaceful ways that build trust. This is all very sad, yet with our youth there is hope and we must teach them that peace is the only answer. We must teach billions of people to help each other. How? I do not know. Watch the documentary W. on hulu. It shows what happened, all of the planning and hubris, all of the capitulation. None of these people were heroes. As a matter of fact they were killing hundreds of thousands and walking around like a bunch of morons planning it all. The movie W. is a perfect example of why war should only be used for actual self defense against invasion, or an attack by an actual nation using real weapons. You can’t have a war against an idea, because the fighting will last until the idea is gone, which in this case since war breeds terrorism, will be never. This isn’t a joke, it is real. The United States Of America, my only home, will have troops in Afghanistan, Iraq and possibly other places, forever? Until a new source of energy is established? what? What is this? I am also afraid to say anything here for fear of big brother. But I will be an American and say my piece, Freedom of Speech protected by the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States Of America, is my right and I will defend it by using my right.

          Reply
        • The Mommy Lane

           /  September 14, 2011

          Allison, that was extremely well said.

          Reading this post broke my heart. Words can not express how sorry I am that this happened. My heart goes out to you and I hope that you will be able to move on from this without too many scars. The effects of racism are powerful and they can change who you are as a person.

          Reply
        • Ranti

           /  September 14, 2011

          I am 30 yrs old, I am a family physician and I am also African.Let us call a spade a spade and not just an agricultural implement. This is racial profiling, period.

          As a frequent visitor to the US, I have over time and out of necessity, become somewhat immune to the frustrating and sometimes inane questioning & searching that I’ve had to endure at point of entry into this great country,simply because of my skin colour and the colour of my passport.

          However ,on my most recent visit here, the treatment was so appalling, I was almost left in tears. I had flown in from Heathrow in London,and as I was passing through immigration to get onto a connecting flight to DC from Miami, I was stopped and questioned 3 times for no apparent reason at all,but as the only non-white person on that plane, it wasn’t rocket-science to figure out why.

          After the third dude had finished questioning me, I was aksed to follow him and as we were walking down the corridor towards a room, I politely asked him what was going on and if whatever was going to happen wouldn’t take too long as my connecting flight would be boarding in about 40 mins.Without so much as a glance at me, he barked & said “Sir, I don’t care. You could be there for 20mins or you could be there for 4 hours, it is what it is”.

          So I was led into this room and as I walked in, I observed that there were about 60 other people in that room – and what was so immediately obvious was that apart from myself there were 4 other black people in there with the rest being hispanic, so clearly, nothing “random” about this “stop & search” then. I was kept in there for about 2 and a half hoursand eventually when I was called to the desk, the questions asked were the SAME ones the previous 3 guys had asked me – ”Why are you here?’. ”What do you do?”, “How long are you here for?”, “You were in this country 3 times last year, how come you can afford to come here so often?” ( Well, because I can afford it,duh!!), that plus the fact that I’ve got family here- I was at my brother’s graduation from Harvard, I was best man at my friend’s wedding in Texas and I also came later on in the year for a medical conference in New York. There you go all explained, the barking at me was totally unnecessary as was the suspicious tone & manner in which the questions were yelled at me. By this time of course, I’d not only missed my scheduled connecting flight,but also 2 other connecting flights I could potentially had got on, my checked-in luggage had already gone ahead to my destination airport, and I didn’t get into my final destination until 3:30 a.m the next morning – at another airport miles away from where my luggage had gone ( my previous scheduled arrival barring this incident was to have been 6pm) .It was an altogether very unpleasant experience and made me reflect on whether I wanted to continue visiting the States in the near future – each trip from Europe with ticket fare, hotel stay, spending money etc, usually costs me at least $2,000. That’s $2,000 to the US economy each time I come here, but if i’m going to be made to feel as if I must be up to no good simply because of my skin colour, then is it really worth it? Might it not be better to take my tourist dollars to say Bahamas for example,at least there I know I won’t be humiliated for being “different”. No one is saying Homeland Security shouldn’t do their job, and post 9/11, I understand the paranoia that’s quite prevalent in the society these days. But there must be a way in which the job can be done more efficiently & competently and certainly more courteously, with respect and dignity to the passenger/traveller. Not all visitors to the US bear malicious intent towards this great nation, and certainly not all “non-white, non-American” nationals of other great countries are terrorists.

          While I am reallly sorry about this truly unpleasant experience that you had to go through Hoshana, I am very happy and applaud you for sharing your experience and thus helping to initiate and generate debate and discussion on this topical issue.

          The bitter truth of the matter is that this sort of thing happens ALL to the time to those of us who are “different” on account of descent or accent. Our stories never get told because we are “foreign” and so therefore in some way, in doesn’t matter the way we are treated,because we don’t matter, we don’t have a voice.

          Reply
        • Anne

           /  September 14, 2011

          They have not accomplished that task. Accomplishing this task would not generate over 300 supporters of this post and 1,726 responses. The world is evolving into one of dialogue and communication. How many individual people around the world respond to a community’s aid in the face of devastation? This past Sunday I decided to read up on 9/11 – not the political rhetoric, but what people did and how they helped, blindly, unflaggingly and out of instinct. I was amazed.

          Reply
        • Susan

           /  September 14, 2011

          The terrorists are traitors within your own gov.. 911 wasnt perpetrated by Muslims. Watch Loose Change. Watch this little summary: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JO2KOL6SadY&list=PLDEFDED8905F97506&feature=player_embedded#!

          Reply
        • Alicia Chandler

           /  September 14, 2011

          I hate it, but I have to agree with your point of the terrorists winning by turning Americans and people in general against each other, based on race and/or ethnicity.

          Thank you so much for sharing your horror with us, to make us all aware of what is happening to innocent people all the time. Unfortunately, we sometimes need a reminder, and I hate that it was at your expense, and the expense of the other two gentlemen who went through it with you. I pray that you will be able to ‘be the bigger person’, and expect that you are, by not hating all of us for the bigots and jerks that ARE out there. Hugs and prayers,

          Alicia

          Reply
      • Abhi

         /  September 13, 2011

        Personally, as a non-american, I can completely understand a country that was attacked by a bunch of foreigners, conducting racial-profiling… of foreigners. But when some geniuses decide that the response to terrorists from another country blowing up stuff, is to start suspecting and treating your own citizens as criminals, it starts seeming surreal. How hard would it be to just maybe casually check the “suspects” for weapons and isolate them while you checked if they actually were citizens or not? If they are citizen how does anything else matter? How many americans participated in 911 exactly?

        I could totally understand if I as a foreigner was treated as a suspect. Hey, I have all the choice in the world to not to travel to USA. I mean the country was attacked by foreigners, so I may not like to be treated like this, but I can at least understand.

        But why should an American citizen be understanding about this? Why should they cooperate?

        And what is even more surreal is that majority of Americans will actually accept this kind of logic and take it lying down. Why is no one actually asking their representatives, why the government is treating its own citizens as potential terrorists? Why is no one asking Obama this question on Live TV?

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        • Ricky

           /  September 13, 2011

          First, I appreciate this comment coming from a non-American citizen. I also believe that if this happened to an American flying to another country, there would be a lot of yelling and self-righteousness about how dare they detain me, etc. But, for an American, in America, its just taken as if its for the ‘Good of the General Population’. Those bleak futures spoken about in 1984 and Brave New World are coming true and America is the leader.

          Reply
          • jem from california

             /  September 13, 2011

            Please explain what you mean by a “non-American Citizen”. If I read correctly she is an american and always has been. It’s her family that were Non-american at one time in her heritage line.

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          • Cassandra

             /  September 13, 2011

            “I also believe that if this happened to an American flying to another country, there would be a lot of yelling and self-righteousness about how dare they detain me, etc.”

            Exactly. Imagine three American white dudes getting pulled off a plane in Jordan, or China, and being arrested and interrogated for six hours. The American press would go absolutely apeshit.

            But the scariest thing about this is the (nice) FBI agent mentioning that there had been 50 similar incidents that day. This is not a unique story that we can wave away as “oh, better safe than sorry”. This is something that happened to one intelligent, eloquent woman with a blog who wanted to share her story, and about a hundred other people who we haven’t heard from, who probably want to forget the entire thing. It’s not an freak accident – this is how Homeland Security works, and it is beyond ridiculous. According to the AP article, the government sent two fighter jets to “escort” the plane into Detroit. Because there were too many brown people in one place, and one of them had the drizzling shits during the flight. Terrifying, really.

            Reply
          • I think as an immigrant who is now an American citizen (and well aware of American history and culture), I concur with Abhi’s words. American citizens should not take this lying down or without clothes. The person should sue the government and take it to the Supreme Court and get them to rule on this issue, and who knows, a court may well find these kinds of activities illegal and unconstitutional. The problem is that no one is doing this since they don’t have the resources to deal with the legal system (which has become a travesty). So unless you can fight your own case or unless you’re rich enough to hire a good lawyer, you’re hosed.

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        • JackRabbit

           /  September 13, 2011

          Our “representatives” are not (and have not for some time) representing us. They speak for their bank accounts and special interest groups. They don’t care about what happens to the average American so long as they get theirs.

          It’s sad. And I pray every night that it stops. But it’s the truth.

          Reply
          • wargalley

             /  September 13, 2011

            Worst part about it imo is how the Patriot Act was reinstated in less than an hour about half a year ago or so. When does our government EVER take less than an hour to decide on something important?

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          • Gump

             /  September 13, 2011

            So and sadly true.

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        • Bang

           /  September 13, 2011

          Well, this kind of reaction that the US Gov gives to her citizens is not the first time. Otherwise, there would not have the Japanese Internment Camps during WWII!

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        • Finisterre

           /  September 13, 2011

          Wait, what? So it’s not OK for Shoshana to be arrested and humiliated, likely because of her ethnicity, because she’s an American citizen, but it would be absolutely fine for a *non-American* person to be arrested and humiliated because of their ethnicity?

          This is *exactly* the same thinking that caused this disgusting incident to happen to Shoshana. Racial profiling is wrong because it targets innocent people for very nasty harassment on unacceptably vague and ineffective grounds. What happened to Shoshana should not happen to anyone, American citizen or not. It is not an effective way of preventing terrorism and it is certainly not the action of a liberal, rational state.

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        • Chris

           /  September 13, 2011

          Great post…well said.

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        • In Respect

           /  September 13, 2011

          Abhi, thank you for your comment. As an American, I appreciate your appreciation of why racial profiling is a logical course of action to take. To your question, a couple of the latest attempted attacks were by American citizens with ties to terror groups and if I recall, there was some indication that attempts on the anniversary might be by “home grown terrorists”.

          Reply
        • Abhi, you are absolutely right with your questions. I asked myself the same questions but got no answer.

          Reply
        • Lisa

           /  September 13, 2011

          Unfortunately, we have terrorists here in our own country that are citizens and who choose to follow some anti-American train of thought. Whether American citizens or not, any form of terrorist is not something anybody in any country should have to deal with. With that being said, it is horrible that this woman underwent this treatment. It’s like seeing somebody on the street and assuming they are a gang member because of the way they look. Because of a few sick twisted people, the newest form of biggotry has come at the expense of those of middle-eastern heritage. Even President Obama has had to endure such prejudice even after he has won an election and is trying to run a country.
          I hope this helps us all to become more accepting of others…even if they look like they are middle-eastern. Just like every other generalization, just because their skin is darker or they look a certain way, doesn’t mean that are going to do harm to anyone or anything.

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        • Chris

           /  September 13, 2011

          did you know that at least one of the terrorists who help hijack one of the airlines was an american citizen and had been living in america legally practically his whole life? he had 2 kids and a wife and lived in florida. but yet you ask why us americans treat our own citizens like this its because of people like that terrorist. just because your a citizen doesnt mean your here because you love the country. and that goes for any race for those people who like to play the race and ethnicity game.

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          • Allison

             /  September 13, 2011

            So, it is your opinion that all American citizens should be strip searched and cavity probed either before, during, or after flying, yes? I mean, if you are making the argument that one of the 9/11 terrorists was an American citizen, then all American citizens need to be searched and interrogated the way Ms. Shebshi was, according to that logic.

            Unless you are making the argument that only SOME American citizens should be searched and interrogated, and certainly you aren’t making that argument, are you?

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            • You are twisting words and therefore not making any sense what so ever. Just thought you should know.

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              • Sarah

                 /  September 13, 2011

                …yeah, her comment came completely out of left field. Chris was saying that not every terrorist attacking the U.S. comes from a non-U.S. country.

                And yes, “only SOME American citizens should be searched and interrogated” — ones that look nervous, ones whose paperwork doesn’t line up with the facts, etc.

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                • Ron

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  Well .. looking nervous is fairly normal when there is a threat of a finger going up your butt. And what paperwork?, flying domestically in the US no ID is required, you will definitely be held up without it, but you can freely travel from Maine to California by bus with no formal ID, flying is no different.

                  Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  My comments were based on “Chris”‘s original posts, the first part of which is reproduced here:

                  “did you know that at least one of the terrorists who help hijack one of the airlines was an american citizen and had been living in america legally practically his whole life? he had 2 kids and a wife and lived in florida. but yet you ask why us americans treat our own citizens like this its because of people like that terrorist.”

                  My assumption, based on that post, is that “Chris” was saying that because one of the 9/11 terrorists was an American citizen, it was okay to target American citizens for Constitutional rights violations. If “Chris” was saying something else, it was not clear what that was.

                  Ms. Shebshi’s paperwork was not at issue, nor was her demeanor at issue. She was reported for suspicious activity for sitting in the same row as men of Indian descent.

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                  • Justin

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Allison, millions of American citizens who have the appearance of possible middle eastern decent, myself included have been aboard air planes since 9/11. These people are not routinely strip searched and violated. This is an isolated incident with very unique circumstances. I belief your views are coming from a noble place, but it doesn’t seem as if you are able to step back and view this particular incident objectively. Although everybody should be empathetic for these individuals involved, I think most rational people who are able to put aside political correctness and be honest with themselves would admit that the particular circumstances of this incident would create reasonable suspicion.

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                    • Allison

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      The particular circumstances of this incident create reasonable suspicion how? Simply because Ms. Shebshi was sitting in the same row as two other dark-skinned individuals? What did Ms. Shebshi do that fit the description of suspicious activity?

                      Just because every single dark-skinned flier isn’t strip searched and interrogated doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be outraged when racial profiling is done for some of them.

                    • Joe Jericho

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      I don’t get this comment either. I am looking at this objectively and asking questions, which is what Allison is doing. Obviously, Allison is concerned not only with this incident, but with the broader implications of what is happening here. I am also concerned about this. Clearly, there are not enough facts known for you to conclude that there was reasonable suspicion in this case. The blog entry doesn’t demonstrate the facts, but neither does the AP story. I want to know more. In the meantime, it sounds like some other passenger(s) reported “suspicious activity”. What does that mean? Should the government have to articulate to the aggrieved what that suspicion was or what it constitutes? This is a dangerous situation that is used in Cuba all the time to go in and ransack people’s homes and lives. Seemingly, we are but a step away from that. I have a problem with that.

                    • Tony S

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Justin,

                      I’m one of those US citizens who appears to be of middle eastern descent, though I’m of Italian and Mexican heritage. Prior to 9-11 I was frequently stopped by airport security for additional checks, including having my laptop case swiped with a card to check for chemical residue.

                      At first, it was embarrassing, then it was just plain annoying. My being stopped meant my co-workers had to wait for me, or worse, they would be checked as well.

                      Following 9-11, my first few trips through airport security were much different. My first flight was just after planes were allowed to fly again, and there were some in the media warning of racial profiling. During that first trip, not only wasn’t I checked, when I passed the security personnel that checked bags for chemical substance, the officers actually turned away from me. While it was a nice change, I didn’t think it was going to last. It didn’t.

                      Not long after, I was almost always taken aside for extra screening at the main checkpoint, and occasionally had the “X” on my ticket that identified me as someone who had to be checked at the gate as well. It would sometimes take me a half hour to get through security from start to finish, not counting the time I spent waiting in line.

                      While I originally considered it to be just a progression in making the flying public feel more secure, I soon came to resent all the extra attention. So did my co-workers.

                      While my experiences weren’t as extreme as Mrs. Shebshi’s, it was apparent to me that things were going too far. People shouldn’t have to go through this, not in the USA. It’s not what we stand for, and none of us should accept it as the price to pay because some people wish to live in fear.

                      At no time does law enforcement have a right to invade our physical self without due cause. And last I heard, an unsubstantiated allegation is considered hearsay, not due cause.

                      if you’re willing to give up your Constitutional rights, including the right to privacy and the assumption of innocent until proven guilty, be my guest, but don’t demand the same from me.

                  • Charls Martel

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Correct, there is no way to tell if someone is a terrorist by Citicenship. all individuals should be treated with equal suspicion. unless you have evidence of the contrary (that is, no us citien engages or will engage in a form of terrorism).

                    in the end the moral of the story should be about how everyone should get along, because it is not about the rules we put into place doing what they were designed to do.

                    I am not aware of any Constitutional rights violations here either.

                    Reply
                    • Joe Jericho

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      With all due respect, that is because you just aren’t aware period. Again, I’d like to know where an anonymous report leads to a strip search without more reasonable suspicion. Obviously, they searched her to see if she had a device or explosive on her person, right? I mean, what other technical explanation for the search? She was screened by TSA. They can check her hands and garmets for explosive residue. They can do an enhanced pat-down, but no, they wanted to do the strip search. Why? You don’t know why, but the government does and I want to hear the explanation. Maybe TSA Bob will tell us (then again, maybe he wont). lol

                    • Lance

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      4th Amendment – unreasonable search and seizure, based upon the report of “suspicious activity” (which was merely sitting in her seat) by a citizen with no applicable training to determine probable cause.

                      6th Amendment – the right to face your accuser.

                      A lesson in Constitutional law would serve you well.

                    • Matt

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Look up Coffin v. United States.

                      We are a nation governed by the Rule of Law. That is the essence of a Republic. There are three sources of law in this country — the United States Constitution, Congress, and Common Law as established through the precedents set by our court system. The last time I checked, the crashing of planes into buildings by foreign terrorists does NOT constitute one of those sources of law. It therefore does not grant legitimacy to measures which contradict our fundamental laws.

                      Presumption of innocence is a firmly established matter of Common Law in this country. Coffin v. United States firmly established that. It does not need a word-for-word presence in the Constitution to be the law of the land.

                      Your notion that “all individuals should be treated with equal suspicion. unless you have evidence of the contrary (that is, no us citien engages or will engage in a form of terrorism),” is as unpatriotic and illegal as it is paranoid.

                    • Susan

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Have you read the Constitution? Of course her rights were violated. Also I am not aware that any of the alleged highjackers were American. One lived in FL and worked for the NSA- Mohammed Atta- an Egyptian. But he was employed by our own gov.- the NSA. His father also claims to have gotten a call from him the day after 911. 7 of the alleged highjackers turned up alive and living abroad. One had died 2 years before. HOW CAN ANY GOV. HAVE MUGSHOTS of 19 men and have “solved the crime” within 2 days of the event before doing an investigation- especially when these 19 names were not on the official passenger lists- and where would they have gotten mugshots?

                • Paul K

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  One who spends too much time in the bathroom…

                  Reply
                  • Ejaz

                     /  March 1, 2012

                    Let me say what some of you are circumnavigating, if you look of Arab\sub Asian descent and are a US cititzen you should accept to be treated differently. So much for equal rights and discrimination, but dont worry ‘”its for you’re own protection”

                    Reply
          • You had me right up to the point where you failed 8th grade English . . .

            learn the difference between ‘your’ and you’re’ . . . how hard is this folks?

            Reply
            • Grammar Clown

               /  September 14, 2011

              It could have been a typo. And how hard is it to write in normal sentences instead of using your silly ellipses?

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            • MrLee

               /  September 14, 2011

              OH NO SHE MADE A SPELLING ERROR!! Lets discredit everything they say because they used your instead of you’re!! Give me a break and grow the F up and get over it!!!
              Anyways, I am very sorry for what happened to you Shoshana!! Like someone typed above “People have become so paranoid, scared of every shadow, every whisper that isn’t government sanctioned. I am ashamed of people who react blindly.”

              Reply
          • Chetan

             /  September 14, 2011

            It may go for any race, but how many stories have you heard of three white people locked up, not given access to a lawyer, and strip searched?

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            • Joe Jericho

               /  September 14, 2011

              That’s a good point. Right now, I am not familiar with it. I have just heard and seen a lot of white people and white kids getting groped at the airport, but I digress, I suppose it could be worse. I am still not going to excuse it. My feeling is that the government no longer works for us. It is us against them. They treat us as their subjects, and that is not the America I grew up in.

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          • alytron

             /  September 14, 2011

            Really? all of the information I can find about them says no, that is not true at all. So please give up some information, a name, a link to a news story, something to validate this.

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        • Kathy

           /  September 13, 2011

          our own citizens do plot against us!! There are Americans involved in terrorist activities. That is part of the problem!! I feel bad about this particular incident but I also understand where whoever reported this is coming from. I wish they would have watched more closely because if what you say is true( never left your seat, didn’t talk to anyone etc.) than hopefully it would never had happened!! But I am very nervous to fly. And I do watch others very carefully when I’m flying. I do agree a casual “check” would have been better. Americans come in all races and all nationalities and so I really do watch everyone!!

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          • Allison

             /  September 13, 2011

            Please provide links to stories of white Americans being handcuffed and removed from a plane, strip and cavity searched, and interrogated.

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            • Justin

               /  September 14, 2011

              Allison please provide links to distinctly identifiable white Americans that hijacked air planes and flew them into buildings killing thousands. I will then provide links to similar looking distinctly identifiable white Americans being handcuffed and removed from a plane, strip and cavity searched, and interrogated because they randomly found themselves in a situation that provoked reasonable suspicion…It’s not as simple as your trying to make it !!!

              Reply
              • In 1974, a disgruntled white man walked into BWI, shot and killed an airport security guard and then proceeded to hijack an airliner for the sole purpose of flying it into the white house and killing the President. Does that sound at least similar to 9/11? Things like that event actually have happened quite a few times but rarely go reported for security reasons. We don’t want people to know just how often government leaders are targeted.

                The situation described by Mrs. Hebshi was racially motivated and no reasonable probable cause was given to justify the actions taken.

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              • Allison

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Just because Ms. Shebshi happens to be in the same ethnic group as the 9/11 terrorist does not make her a terrorist, nor does it make the millions of people in that ethnic group terrorists by definition.

                What actions by Ms. Shebshi provoked reasonable suspicion?

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                • Joe Jericho

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  I think Justin makes a good point, but this is why we need something more of an Israeli-based screening model, not the monster we have created due to political concerns. At the same time, you are correct about the reasonable suspicion angle. As a regular joe looking out for my family and our freedoms, I do believe that the enhanced screening needs to be appropriately targeted, but in this case, we are talking about prior-screening, not after that fact harassment like we see here. This story implicates do many problems with what is going on with air transportation in America and even other societal issues.

                  Reply
              • David

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Timothy McVeigh was a typical looking white American. He personally participated in the planning and execution of a terrorist attack in the US that killed 167 people. He didn’t use a plane, he used a Ryder rental truck.

                By your logic, can you provide links to similar looking white Americans being handcuffed and detained, strip and cavity searched, and interrogated because they happened to be renting a moving truck?

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              • Jeanine

                 /  September 14, 2011

                We do NOT NEED TO ACCEPT THESE TYPE OF VILE VIOLATIONS Timothy McVeigh murdered several HUNDRED people in a FEDERAL BUILDING NO LESS, and yet we do not see white males being profiled. You are BIGOTED ASS JUSTIN.

                Reply
              • I support Rationality

                 /  September 14, 2011
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              • Jess

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Dude that’s racist.

                I mean, really, literally-Joe-Biden, it is. I’m not just some airheaded pwog that likes to use that word all the time. Attempting to justify mistreatment of human beings by referring to the actions of other people with a similar ethnicity is like straight out of the KKK, yo.

                Timmy McVeigh was white, and every day thousands of people that look just like him hang out at federal buildings without getting strip-searched. Furthermore, they wouldn’t get strip-searched even if some cowardly mouth-breathing kook called in a warning of “suspicious behavior”. Double standard, amirite?

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          • Tony

             /  September 14, 2011

            And while you`re watching everyone else I will report you for looking nervous and suspicious.

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        • Ahbi,

          You have my utmost respect and admiration for your very sensible and logical comment. It’s more about controlling and stripping the citizenry of our rights than it is about security. Why couldn’t they have put the “suspects” through one of those virtual clothes-stripping scanners when they were taken into custody, and/or had them sniffed by a bomb-detecting dog, or some other screening process that does not involve the indignation to which they were subjected. Ok, it’s plausible that a plot could have existed, and perhaps that plot could include blowing the whole plane up when it reaches the terminal, but that’s the risk everyone takes when we travel–some idiot is gonna do something stupid. I’m not going to blame the Captain, who ultimately decided that the information relayed to him in-flight by his crew was enough reason to report it to authorities on the ground, who made the call based on a report passed-off 3rd-hand from 30,000 feet. For crying out loud, the flight was traveling from a U.S. major city, not some foreign country that could care less about our security concerns. They could have given the people something like a sobriety test on the spot, like, “who’s your Senator or Congressman?” or “describe the house that you grew up in.” If they start singing alla akbar, or some other crazy crap, then they get strip searched. But if they can answer without a terrorist accent or attitude, then let them go, or at least tell them that if they don’t strip or somehow show that they’re legit, then they’ll be subjected to surveillance, and/or put on the no-fly list, for say, 6 months. I mean, whatever happened to the protection against “unreasonable searches and seizures?” If you’re born here, and/or you have melted into the pot by learning the language and you dress and act like an American, like this Mom apparently does, give ‘em a break! Take down their license, and follow up if they feel as though they’re a threat. If they are, then more terrorists could be caught w/out even having to do the Chinese water-torture thing.

          Reply
        • That is so true @ Abhi and I absolutely support it. I mean as a non-american citizen and a colored person i get stopped at every single air travel and i am always one of those randomly chosen persosn who is put through full body search or asked to randomly open her cabin luggage right before boarding a flight when my baggage has already been cleared. however i have always justified that as thinking a country which has been attacked has some right to check international incoming people more stringently than citizens. but its un-acceptable when its meted out to american citizens because of color. as someone very well said before in one of the posts-its okay to harasss colored “American citizens” because caucasian citizens can feel safer! wow!

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          • Joe Jericho

             /  September 14, 2011

            This isn’t totally right. My white brother gets harassed flying to Asia all the time, both here in the US and over there. He just fits some kind of profile, probably involving drugs. But, I commend you for recognizing, without knowing our laws, that you traditionally you do not have the same rights when you are trying to enter the country from abroad as opposed to already being here. Unfortunately, our government is not recognizing this right all that much at the airports and even at the bus and train stations on occasion when they set up mobile TSA checkpoints.

            Reply
        • Abhi writes, “How hard would it be to just maybe casually check the “suspects” for weapons and isolate them while you checked if they actually were citizens or not?”

          Believe it or not, Abhi, this is not a question of citizenship. All non-citizens who are in the United States have the same rights afforded by the constitution as do citizens. The only right they don’t have is the right to vote.

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      • Ditto to the other responses to Dallas. Not only did they succeed in dividing us further but succeeded in bankrupting us thanks to the response to 9/11 (going to war).

        Reply
        • Rightasrain

           /  September 13, 2011

          Think California is bankrupt because of a war or stupidity?

          Reply
        • Marnie

           /  September 14, 2011

          Um, no – the people in charge of our own financial systems bankrupted us. Blaming it on the 9/11/01 attacks is simply an extreme form of laziness and denial, not to mention an aversion to taking responsibility for changing the situation. We are the only ones responsible for our reactions to their actions. We could have responded differently. There was certainly no need to declare war on Iraq in response to an attack by a rebel group in Afghanistan.
          Obviously, many Americans need to wipe the sleep from their eyes and start looking at the cold hard facts. But, to do that, we have to convince our citizens to get off their lazy asses, turn off the reality t.v., put away the Doritos and actually do something… I mean, who is actually going to admit responsibility for something they’d have to do something about if they were to acknowledge the truth? This corrupt government is doing an amazing job of keeping us sick and unmotivated to move at all.
          This is not the fault of the terrorists – it’s not even the fault of our government! It is our own fault. So, either stop bothering to comment on blogs about it, or get off your asses and do something.

          Reply
          • Marnie, how you feel about the war is exactly how I feel about it –it was unnecessary. (Read what I wrote again – I said “response to 9/11″ – I didn’t say 9/11 itself). But it wasn’t the banking system that caused us trillions of dollars deficit… it was the war. By September 2008 when the banks collapsed, we already had a deficit.

            Reply
            • AND by the way, this is what the terrorists ultimately want: the collapse of America. That’s why they chose the twin towers in Manhattan –it’s a symbol of our dreams and also our might, it’s right next to Wall Street. Did they expect our economy to collapse? No. They didn’t even think the towers would collapse (going by a recent documentary I saw about Bin Laden). But we responded in such a way as to bankrupt ourselves.

              Damn that Bush.

              Reply
      • Martijn

         /  September 13, 2011

        Unfortunately, it will be a long long way (if ever) to return to anything that resembles normal. A major problem is that instilling fear works very well on most (and it seems especially the American) people. Sad but true.
        People don’t rationalize for themselves anymore, they let others tell them “truths” and use fear as a way to feed these truths. Look at advertisement for health products for example, most of it is based on fear.

        Reply
      • Laura

         /  September 13, 2011

        The last ten years may be the best gift to those who study the sociology of Nazism and/or Communism. The question of how a civilized and educated people (Germany in the beginning of the 20th century) would become accomplices to the Nazi government that passed the Nuremberg laws and how a people would turn their backs on their neighbors and friends, locking the other way when the authorities arrested and detained with no other reason but race is being answer here, in America, for the last ten years. Cowered by fear, not only of terrorists but of the Homeland security, FBI and the slew of other agencies that grew out of 9/11, each of us is silent and compliant, when not others rights are infringed but ours as well. Now we know that the communists might not have been smart economists or administrators but they were brilliant sociologists and psychologists. They knew that once the spirit of a people is broken through terror controlling the individuals is easy. You just need to reinforce the memory once in a while, just to remind the folks who is in control. Otherwise, just arrest people, limit their liberties, take away their rights – not all at once, just few at a time – and, when one day, they will realize what happens to them it would be too late – the muzzle in place, the chains permanently attached and a fake smile required – they are now protected.

        Reply
        • I understand the thoughts of trying to equate Nazism and Communism to overeacting security issues such as this but they are not even close to being on the same moral plane and I am so tired of people comparing one kind of issue to another without really critically looking at the nature of the items being compared. Your reaction is the fear itself, not what is going on. I have had other times when authorities have required my personal information due to suspicions but you don’t argue, you deal with it and if there is a violation of your rights you lawyer up. That’s life.

          Reply
          • Ian

             /  September 13, 2011

            Er. In what way IS this different than the early years of Nazism and Communism? This IS what it was like, and the Russian people and the German people just going along with it is what allowed it to progress into its later, worse forms.

            You stop things like that at THIS point, not at THAT point. Your argument is what? Are we supposed to wait until we get to Stalin before we take any action, or are we supposed to try to point out how wrong it is NOW, BEFORE we get to Stalin?

            Reply
            • paul

               /  September 13, 2011

              early nazism didn’t look anything like what the writers did. early nazism involved serious amounts pressure and injustice at an ENTIRE group. This story illustrates what happened to a few of the millions of indians/middle easterners in this country. there is no systematic effort by the government to prevent these folks from owning property, getting a job, or anything else the nazis forced on the jews during their early reign in germany.

              also, although i’m deeply disturbed by how this situation was handled by the government (in an unthinking, mindless, by the book way). imagine what would happen if lax security caused a plane to be blown up. i agree that these folks should have been taken outside the plane for a moment, questioned by a seasoned professional or maybe an israeli agent (the israeli airport authorities are crackerjack at this) in the back of a bus or something, and then cleared to go. there are tell tale signs of terror and a seasoned agent would be able to pick up on these things immediately. I really think this is the result of 1) it being 9/11 2) rednecks on the plane who would rather be safe than sorry 3) officers who are not able to think or making decisions but have to follow protocol by the book. In any case, this never should have happened.

              But I don’t think it’s fair to equate this with nazism

              Reply
              • You need to study how nazism and stalinism worked. It is the exact same game plan, exact same process, for the same reasons, for the same goals. Read Rise and Fall by Shirer, and read why the communists built the berlin wall, for exactly the same reasons we are building wall with mexicans… national security, economic concerns, terrorism… It needs to stop now.

                Reply
              • Tom Lange

                 /  September 13, 2011

                I don’t think you are looking at the big picture in your reply… Nazi Germany started by believing that a certain group of people were to blame… They became the focal point, and the scapegoat… And from there, it wasn’t long before Hitler was leading the lemmings on a leash-to genocide.

                Take a step back, and look again… The similarities are there… If you don’t see them, I suggest that you might believe that “apples and oranges” is a valid expression of disparate things… (it isn’t.)

                Reply
                • Tony

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Tom I agree with you and Ian, I have studied WWII and I thoroughly. Here`s what the Sheeple you are arguing with cannot see and what happened ten years ago is exactly what happened in Nazi Germany.

                  As a reasoned to give him control over Germany He burned down the Parliament building and blamed it on foreign terrorist which enabled him to create laws that took the german peoples right away and made them the enemy as well as have their blessing to go to war to get the terrorist.

                  And this was exactly what happened on 9/11 our own Gov`t did this blamed it on foreign terrorist of middle eastern decent to get us into war while at the same time created laws that made us the enemy.

                  All of Bushes speeches were recycled Hitler speeches with Hitlers named changed to Bush, and so his daddy and the Bin Ladens made billions and Billions of Dollars along with the new tricky Dick (Chaney) The Bank HSBC and loads of others.

                  And in the end we`re the ones that got screwed.

                  Reply
                  • Joe Jericho

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    I agree with your other posts, but not this one. First of all, Hitler blamed the torching of the Reichstag on the Communists, as in domestic communists. Minor point, I know. I also agree with you that Bush has played a big hand in this, but Obama has clearly doubled-down on it. This alarms me that both parties act in such a tyrannical and dictatorial fashion. Some of the tactics used appear to be “gestapo” and nazi-like, and they are, but I think if we are moving towards one model at all, it is more of a socialist/communist model rather than a fascist model. Of course, by now, the argument is almost semantical. Who cares? We the people get screwed. We need Obama to get tossed out of the white house. At the same time, we don’t need one party controlling all of government. I suffer no delusions that a Republican president is going to stop all of this nonsense going on at the airports. Hell, the media won’t even ask the candidates their stance on this. And we all know that Rick Perry played a major role in killing the Texas anti-TSA state bill.

                    Reply
                  • Lance

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    You were being somewhat reasonable, until:

                    “All of Bushes speeches were recycled Hitler speeches with Hitlers named changed to Bush, and so his daddy and the Bin Ladens made billions and Billions of Dollars along with the new tricky Dick (Chaney) The Bank HSBC and loads of others.”

                    Now I have no choice but to discount your post as tired rhetorical tripe. (And by the way – I’m with the author on this, not those who flail wildly trying to defend undefendable policy)

                    Reply
              • what about the right to remain silent? you come on the airplane, seize me off of it, cuff me, toss me in a cell, and generally behave like a storm trooper. My response is to tell you to f off – but thats just me. I have ZERO reason to speak with you – just get me a lawyer and wait for the feces storm to begin. I’d still be in jail there in Detroit but I will probably never have to work again . . . because the tax payers will be paying me a huge settlement for the violation of my rights. These folks forget – WE possess the rights – we granted a few to the central government. Its too bad that the Civil War ended the way it did – because it cemented this all knowing all powerful central government that thinks it knows best.

                Reply
                • George Bacon

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  OK, Joe – that’s quite a leap from 2011 terror issues to the outcome of the Civil War. “It’s too bad that the Civil War ended the way it did…” Seriously? If the other side had prevailed, we would still have slavery as a legal institution in this country. Slavery is the ultimate form of terror, is it not?

                  Reply
                • Mister Aloha

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  You speak like that cause you caucasion and this is America, try doing that in a 3rd world country!

                  Reply
                • BayAreaBiker

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Yeah! the idea is good up to a point but the problem with that whole plan is what if after arresting, the “authorities” ship you off to Gitmo or try the case in a Military Court. Remember, the “authorities” have access to the media to let the fellow citizens “know” about the “enemy combatant” before you can even get your day in a court of law and say “Not Guilty”.

                  Reply
            • thankful

               /  September 13, 2011

              Tt seems to me that all you people are forgetting or overlooking one fact the reason that the plane was stopped was because the two men were taking an excessively long time in the bathrooms, Not because of the color of their skin. yes she happened to be sitting with them and she unfortunately was gathered into this whole scenario. I would rather be strip-searched and embarrassed and be alive than not and be dead. So maybe we should be thankful that the pilots and the airline attendants are being more aware of the activities of passengers. It seems to me that you people are the one that is making it about race than about facts. I don’t the pilots looked at them and determine whether they were or were not American citizens. I am sure we are all well aware of the fact that there have been American citizens that have committed travesties . So as far as I’m concerned thank you Frontier pilots and attendant keep up the good job and continue to keep us safe

              Reply
              • Allison

                 /  September 13, 2011

                Your willingness to sacrifice your Constitutional rights does not mean that everyone should be forced to do so.

                Random reports of unspecified suspicious activity by random civilians should not become the basis of illegal or unreasonable searches and seizures.

                Reply
                • Justin

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Allison, “Thankful” pointed out logical and objective reasoning that highlighted the unique facts of this individual scenario, but for some reason you are unable or unwilling to step back and view this objectively on its individual merits. As per the response of the airline and law enforcement the report was neither unspecified or random, to say that you would have to provide evidence that at least on passenger on the plane had a contradictory observation of the men that got up together and spent a long time in the restroom. That information has not even been challenged, hence your arguement of the search being illegal or unreasonable is subjective. I imagine the families of passengers from United Flight 93 might see it differently.

                  Reply
                  • Allison

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Spending a long time in a bathroom due to airsickness is not suspicious.

                    Do not invoke the 9/11 dead to justify this. Doing so dishonors their memory.

                    Reply
                    • Lance

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      /sarcasmon

                      That’s right! Cuff/detain/strip EVERY SINGLE PERSON who spends more than 30 seconds in the lavatory, or who uses a barf bag! Airsickness is a precursor to terror!

                      /sarcasmoff

                  • Joe Jericho

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Looks to me like you are frustrated that Allison won’t see it your way. Sorry, bro, but that’s life. Allison is not acting unreasonable here, and there are loads and loads of unreasonableness on the internet. Allison is looking at this from a more macro point of view in terms how this could impact any and all of us. I understand the viewpoint. If she isn’t a lawyer, she might want to consider law school.

                    Reply
                    • Allison

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Ew, no. Got lots of lawyers in my family, though, and grew up debating issues around the dinner table. Thank you for your kind words.

                • avery

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  uh…that’s where you are WRONG. We live in a democracy.
                  You keep claiming to be American…but you SURE don’t seem to have a clue about American Law and Democracy.

                  I’m growing more suspicious of you by the minute.

                  We elect our leaders and they make laws that we, as citizens follow.

                  it’s really not all that complicated.

                  No one is “sacrificing their Constitutional rights” — in fact — just the opposite. They are following the right to VOTE and have elected leaders make decisions in the best interest of its citizens, which is exactly what Homeland Security was born out of.
                  It’s been around for many years now — so when have you been exercising your “constitutional right” before then to have it revoked, if that’s what you believe?

                  No one said it was a “random report” — and no one said it came from a “civilian” — once again — you are showing your own bias.

                  The pilots do NOT make decisions to have flights scrambled based on “random civilian reports.”

                  You really DO need to take a civics lesson….and get up to speed on how Homeland Security really works.

                  And….you need to get out more (but preferably, not via a plane).

                  Reply
                  • Allison

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Apparently, the decisions of those leaders involved stripping American citizens of their Constitutional rights (or at least redefining those rights in detrimental ways). I do not and did not support those decisions.

                    Pilots, as far as I am aware, don’t make decisions about scrambling F-16s. That would be the decision of Homeland Security, yes? So Homeland Security made the decision to scramble fighter jets, handcuff and detain and strip search and interrogate three innocent people, on the unsubstantiated report of unspecified suspicious activity.

                    That’s not acceptable to me, and it appears based on this comments discussion that it’s not acceptable to a large number of Americans as well.

                    Reply
                  • Johnathane Dorane

                     /  September 15, 2011

                    “uh…that’s where you are WRONG. We live in a democracy.
                    You keep claiming to be American…but you SURE don’t seem to have a clue about American Law and Democracy.”
                    Technically we live in a Representative Republic. In a democracy every policy would have to be put to a general election. I do not normally correct another person’s misidentification of our federal government, but since you decided to insult someone’s understanding of that exact topic I could not help myself.
                    You do not have to exercise a right in order to have it taken away. Are you saying that if I exercise my right to remain silent I forever give up my right to free speech?
                    You are correct that the DHS made the decision to sent the two F16s, although from recent articles no authority is taking credit for the strip-search. The FBI has denied any association with it. The airline has denied ever identifying the lady who wrote the blog post.
                    The DHS was created by the legislative branch, but their creation does not mean they are automatically constitutional. The Judicial branch has the power to reject any law that it deems unconstitutional. Unfortunately they can not exercise this power until the law is challenged. This is why I hope Shoshana does not let this go and pursues all legal avenues available to her. I really want to see whether the judicial branch will deem the detention, strip-searching, and interrogation of someone based on the person assigned to sit in the seat next to them spending a bit of time in the bathroom a constitutionally legal procedure.

                    Reply
                    • ruth

                       /  September 18, 2011

                      Jonathane – I hope she does, too, but I wonder if DHS and the airline are already working on sweeping it under the rug and paying the three off so that this test doesn’t occur, and they continue to operate in the same fashion. With denials from the airline and FBI, it looks as though the documentation trail is already being hidden…or maybe this is just another way that the Patriot Act makes it possible to treat someone as a criminal or combatant, then deny it because there is “no proof” of its occurrence.

              • Anne

                 /  September 13, 2011

                It wasn’t because they took a long time in the bathroom, it’s because they went to the bathroom in succession. As in, one went to the bathroom, came back, and then the other one got up and went to the bathroom. Nothing else was offered as suspicious activity besides that and the fact that they were all the same race and were sitting next to each other. Right. That’s totally logical. Two people both having to pee around the same time? That NEVER happens! AND they’re all indian!? Better sound the alarms!

                Also, if it had been a flight attendant who thought they were taking too long in the bathroom all they would have had to do was check the bathroom after they were out. Have you been in an airplane bathroom? Not many places to stick a bomb. Also? Since when was taking a long time in the bathroom suspicious anyway? Maybe he was taking a shit. Maybe he was jerking off. Maybe he gets sick on flights and was throwing up because he didn’t want to sit next to a total stranger and throw up in a bag two inches away from them. It’s sad that you think “he must have a bomb” is an acceptable thing to have come to your mind.

                Reply
              • Thankful

                Come back to us when you’ve spent six or seven hours in a police cell, without information, or having any clue about whats going on.

                I find it somewhat gobsmacking that so many people would support such a gross violation of basic human rights based on someone elses paranoia not even based on the observations of trained law professionals.

                So they spent excess time in the bathroom. I have a stomach bug ATOW, I spent half an hour in the bathroom on a flight this morning, and I’m willing to put money on the fact no one would have blinked an eyelid because I’m white

                Reply
              • Joe

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Amazing, all of this happened because they spent too much time or made multiple trips to the rest rest room? People have health issues. Sometimes it is nervousness that results in multiple trips to the rest room. Irritable bowel syndrom, Colitis, nausia etc. There is absolutely no reason for the LEO’s to behave the way that they did. Keep in mind, these people were searched even before getting into the airport sterile area. Where was the risk? What threat did these people present that required the treatment that they received?

                The bottom line here is that the LEO’s were out of line and completely unjustified in what they did.

                Reply
              • Ram

                 /  September 14, 2011

                why is it that people are willing to sacrifice their constitutional rights in this case, but when it comes to giving up the right to bear arms, its’ “over my cold dead hands”?

                Does every white person who buys fertilizer now come under suspicion because of Timothy McVeigh? Let’s be clear, Timothy McVeigh and all the crazies who’ve gone postal and fired automatic weapons in schools, malls, offices, etc have done much more damage to America without nearly the negative response.

                Reply
              • Kremmen

                 /  September 14, 2011

                “thankful”, you are simply an idiot. You are praising the pilots and FA for stupidity in causing someone’s suffering for no reason with no justification. If nothing else, the plane was in the air already. The crew did nothing to restrain the passengers, so, if they’d had a weapon, they had every opportunity to use it. The Frontier staff involved should be arrested for making a false report and should pay compensation to every passenger for the delay, plus massive punitory damages to those who were arrested and assaulted without cause.

                Reply
              • Mister Aloha

                 /  September 14, 2011

                I agree! Freedom is earned, if they don’t like how America operates, then move back to your home country. We are not holding them back if they want to leave. North Koreans cannot leave their country even if they wanted to. That’s how that country lives. So leave if you don’t like America. One Nation Under GOD!!! God Bless the U.S. of A.!!!

                Reply
                • Joe Jericho

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  My family came to the US in the 1700s. Where do you want to place me if I don’t agree with you? Jesus…

                  Reply
                • Matt

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  “Freedom is earned”

                  A question for you. What would you say to the man who wrote this?

                  “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

                  Freedom is another word for Liberty. Now, if the unalienable right to Liberty is granted by our Creator, how can it be earned?

                  Reply
                • alytron

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Freedom is earned??!?!??!! What planet are you from? And if “they” don’t like the way American operates they should leave? First you’re assuming that “they” are immigrants, and second, the whole point of democracy and liberty are totally at odds with your whole statement. I think perhaps you need to open your eyes to the fact that not all brown people were born outside of the USA, that the constitution guarantees them the rights you feel they should “earn” (what have YOU done to earn YOUR freedom?), and also backs up the peoples rights to speak out, mobilize, organize and work towards change, not just be forced to leave. The whole POINT of the constitution is to protect the american people from oppressive, tyrannical rule and protect them from over reaching government, that is why America was formed, and the founding fathers would have told your royalist ass to get back to Britain if they heard you talking that kind of nonsense.

                  Reply
                • Torus

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  Shoshana was, and always has been, a United States citizen. She was born here. I’m sick of all the people telling her to “go back to her home country” when… she’s already there. In the country that she loves.

                  And, by saying “freedom is earned”, thanks for letting us know you slept through your high school government class.

                  Reply
              • Marnie

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Na, I always take a long time in the bathroom – for-ev-er – and I’ve never been questioned, handcuffed, strip searched, or even spoken to about it… Of course not – I’m white. (Nice try.)

                Also, I’m not trained in any sort of law enforcement, or even flight attendant protocol… But I’m sure that I could have easily, nicely, asked the gentleman if he was feeling okay, or needed anything – and found out right away whether he was actually doing something which warranted further investigation. We all watch too many hollywood movies with dumbed-down characters, who seem to have lost all their senses and intuition about anything, and get themselves killed by ignoring every possible sign of real concerns – for the sake of drama… We seem to have lost all faith in our own perception, and live in fear of what our imaginations can conjure up.

                Let’s not forget that the incidents of 9/11/01 were very, very rare – and unlikely to happen again in this country in any one of our – or our grandchildren’s lifetimes – even without strip searches after planes land.

                We need to get a grip on reality, people. Come on.

                Reply
              • Blue Pattern

                 /  September 14, 2011

                “Tt (sic) seems to me that all you people are forgetting or overlooking one fact the reason that the plane was stopped was because the two men were taking an excessively long time in the bathrooms,…”

                So, by this reasoning, an airline passenger who happens to have dark skin or a foreign accent (or both) could and likely would be reported for “suspicious activity” by a “loyal American” passenger who is irritated about having to wait their turn while the first passenger sits on the toilet to defecate — an activity that typically takes longer.

                Right. Now I understand. Using the toilet while looking or sounding different is a “suspicious activity.”

                Reply
              • Jan H

                 /  September 14, 2011

                When I heard this story on the news on Sunday, I thought maybe the men had had Mexican food and how embarrassed they must be. I can’t believe it evolved into this BECAUSE they were Indian.

                Reply
            • I support Rationality

               /  September 14, 2011

              I understand the attraction of trying to make a comparison between early Nazism and today’s America, but it is not possible to compare the CAUSE of the events of 9/11/11 with the cause of Hitler’s hysteria. There was no catastrophic terrorist event that led Hitler to uber-nationalism and his extreme hatred of the Jews. To compare those situations almost seems like justifying Hitler’s actions. We have reason to fear terrorists. We just should not assume that all brown-skinned people are terrorists. Hitler’s hatred of Jews was pure bigotry.

              Reply
          • Scojam

             /  September 13, 2011

            Sorry David but Laura was describing a process by which rights are lost and governments becomes the ultimate all seeing authority and citizens lose all recourse. You can’t compare the USA with Nazi Germany or Soviet Union Communism of course but she wasn’t doing that. Laura was describing a process that certainly is in place in America today. Unless something happens to change that process writers like Laura will be able discuss valid similarities with those regimes. It’s not there yet but it’s coming.

            Reply
          • SHM1026

             /  September 13, 2011

            David, thank you for mentioning that. It drives me up a wall how many times people try to equate Nazism with something going on in America today. The plain truth is that there is NOTHING that even comes close. Comparing something in America with Nazism is part of Glenn Beck’s schtick, and it is just plain ignorant. Since 9-11, we have had to take extraordinary measures to protect ourselves; and so far, we are proving to be lousy at doing it gracefully.

            Reply
          • Liz

             /  September 13, 2011

            PLEASE don’t even TRY to equate what you may have experienced from authorities to what the author experienced. Just stop it. You did not ever experience anything like what she did. “Required my personal information,” indeed. Yeah, they required her personal information, alright.

            Reply
          • Shanna

             /  September 13, 2011

            Yeppers. I am so tired of spoiled Americans whining about the very freedoms and safety the authorities provide. Freedom always comes at a price. I was once checked at an airport for drugs. And I have blonde hair. But I was dressed as a hippie, coming from sf and I realized this and moved on. It was no big deal. Grow up, miss shebhi. The only person who has a problem with your Arab background is you.

            Reply
            • jenojeno

               /  September 13, 2011

              “Until they become conscious they will never rebel, and until after they they have rebelled they cannot become conscious.” — George Orwell

              Reply
            • Allison

               /  September 13, 2011

              You were handcuffed and taken off a plane, strip and cavity searched, and interrogated? I doubt it. You miss the point – “freedom” includes freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures (Constitution) and the right to confront one’s accuser (also, Constitution).

              The price of freedom shouldn’t be the surrender of our freedoms.

              Reply
              • Concerned US Citizen

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Good call, Allison. These three people need to be able to confront their accuser/s. And yes, being detained for hours, handcuffed, strip-searched does not compare to random “checks” for drugs. Let’s see how these people like a TSA officer getting gloved and sticking their fingers up their orifices that are normally only examined by a gynecologist.

                Reply
              • Joe Jericho

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Allison, I think you should ease up on Shanna. She is ok with it because Obama did it. Now, if Bush had been doing this, she probably would have torched something herself. It’s hard dealing with ideologues.

                Reply
              • Katiebug

                 /  September 14, 2011

                I’m not taking a side, simply pointing out holes in your argument.

                “Illegal searches and seizures” is not relevant to this case because of the Patriot Act. It’s law, whether fair or not.

                Nor is the “right to confront one’s accuser”. That’s in court, when you’re being tried for a crime. She did not make it that far into the judicial system because she was charges were not pressed and she was released. Again, fair or not, it is still law.

                Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Thank you Katie. I did read in another post the changes that have been made in the interpretation of our Constitutional rights under the Patriot Act, and realize that that particular part of my argument is flawed.

                  I think the Patriot Act and it’s modifications of Constitutional rights is the real problem here, as well as the interpretation of that Act by the authorities involved.

                  Reply
                • Johnathane Dorane

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  The patriot act can not make something that is unconstitutional suddenly acceptable under the constitution. To my knowledge this can only happen in one of two ways.

                  1) The one we are taught about in highschool government class is an amendment to the constitution itself. The patriot act is a law passed by the legislative branch and signed into law by the executive branch, not a constitutional amendment. Thus the patriot act does not change the constitutionality of these searches.

                  2) The second is through interpretation of the constitution by the Judicial branch. Parts of the Patriot act have already been deemed unconstitutional by the Judicial branch. I hope that Shoshana takes this to court, because I want to know for certain whether the detaining, strip-searching, and interrogation of the three people on this flight is deemed constitutional or not.

                  I fully expect Shoshana and the two others involved to be given substantial settlement offers with the condition that they do not challenge the constitutionallity of the detainment, searching, and interrogation.

                  Reply
              • avery

                 /  September 14, 2011

                get a lawyer then — and let’s just see how far that gets you.
                can’t wait to see how that turns out!

                we get the ‘point’ alright…and it has nothing to do with freedoms.

                Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  I’m not sure who you’re responding to. If the point isn’t freedom, then what is it, in your opinion?

                  Reply
            • Stacy

               /  September 13, 2011

              Oh come on. You were once checked at an airport? You can’t relate to this woman. Unless you can say you were handcuffed, thrown in the back of a car, stripped searched, and fingerprinted- then you should shush. I am tired of people having no sympathy anymore.

              Reply
            • Iqbal

               /  September 14, 2011

              You Shanna have a heart of stone! Ms Shebshi has been thru an awful experience and yet you ask HER to grow up !! Are you real? Do you have peanuts in your brain?

              Reply
            • Marnie

               /  September 14, 2011

              Shanna, you apparently smoked way too much pot during your hippie days in San Francisco. You were probably too stoned to bother arguing, and the weed seems to have either dulled your sense of perception, stripped your ability to read, or vaporized your sense of empathy.
              Did you even read this post by Mrs. Hebshi? (Obviously not, because calling her ‘miss shebhi’ is too far off the mark for you to have actually understood what she wrote.) Furthermore, it occurs to me that the only relevance of your blonde hair, is the senseless comment you made. Rest up, get sober, and try again!

              Reply
            • Johnathane Dorane

               /  September 15, 2011

              Shanna, may I ask why you were checked for drugs at an airport. Was this at customs or the TSA. The mission statement of the TSA has nothing to do with drugs, unless they present a threat to airline safety. If you were checked specifically for drugs at a TSA checkpoint than that is a direct violation of your rights as it is not part of the executive search privlages granted to protect the traveling public. Instead it is a warentless and suspicionless search for evidence of a crime. This is expressely prohibited and a direct violation of the fourth amendment.

              I was also not aware that my freedoms are provided by authorities. I was under the impression that my freedoms were god given and unalianable. Or is that just what some old irrelevent document states. Perhaps if you spent some time edjucating yourself you would not believe that your rights and safety are entirely in the hands of authorities.

              To tell someone who was handcuffed, detained, strip-searched, and interrogated based on the suspicion of a few passengers and the flight crew to grow up is insensitive and selfish.

              Reply
        • B. Perry

           /  September 13, 2011

          Thanks Laura,
          Eric Hoffer, a longshoreman philosopher wrote a book called “True Believer” that studied the very question of how the people in Germany in the 1930s, the most well educated country in Europe could descend into becoming a nation of people that supported its Nazi government. The book is one of the best books I’ve ever read and if anyone wants to gain more understanding of why we as a nation have become what we have, this book offers some insights. Let’s hope we descend no further as that future, if it happens, will cause us to live through a greater real nightmare than we can imagine.

          Reply
        • Absolutely agree. It’s scary.

          Reply
        • JenRo

           /  September 13, 2011

          If only people could recognize this! Sadly there are very few things as powerfull as fear.

          Reply
        • Alice

           /  September 13, 2011

          Brilliant response, Laura, and my impressions as well. Thank you for posting. I believe you and Dallas have nailed it.

          Reply
        • Linda

           /  September 13, 2011

          Well said Laura …

          Reply
        • Concerned US Citizen

           /  September 14, 2011

          Spot on, Laura.

          Reply
        • Theobromine

           /  September 14, 2011

          Communist Rules For Revolution
          (Captured in Dusseldorf May, 1919, by the Allied Forces)
          ______________________________________________

          “A. Corrupt the young, get them away from religion. Get them interested in sex. Make them superficial, destroy their ruggedness.

          “B. Get control of all means of publicity and thereby;
          “1. Get people’s minds off their government by focusing their attention on athletics, sexy books and plays and other trivialities.”
          “2. Divide the people into hostile groups by constantly harping on controversial matters of no importance.”
          “3. Destroy the people’s faith in their natural leaders by holding the latter up to contempt, ridicule and obloquy.”
          “4. Always preach true democracy but seize power as fast and as ruthlessly as possible.”
          “5. By encouraging government extravagance, destroy its credit, produce fear of inflation with rising prices and general discontent.”
          “6. Foment unnecessary strikes in vital industries, encourage civil disorders, and foster a lenient and soft attitude on the part of government toward such disorders.”
          “7. By specious argument cause the breakdown of the old moral virtues: honesty, sobriety, continence, faith in the pledged word, ruggedness.”

          “C. Cause the registration of all firearms on some pretext, with a view to confiscating them and leaving the population helpless.”

          NOTE: “ The above “Rules for Revolution” were secured by the State Attorney’s office from a member of the Communist Party, who acknowledged it to be still a part of the Communist program for overthrowing our Government”

          George A. Brautigam
          State Attorney
          State of Florida

          Reply
          • Silly

             /  September 14, 2011

            Oh, that’s actually a completely fictional account. You can spot this because it’s written in the words an American trying to bash communists would use, not those a communist would use.

            No communist would use “natural ruler”, for example, because there is no “natural ruler”. In fact…no real democratic person would use the phrase, either, because there ARE no “natural rulers” in a democracy.

            So whoever wrote this most likely was a fascist or royalist. Good job eating up Nazi propaganda.

            Reply
        • You don’t even need to go to an example from outside of the USA for that. You can look back on WWII and what happened to the Americans of Japanese descent.

          Reply
        • Isla

           /  September 14, 2011

          Laura, so, so true. I do think the day is coming when we wake up and find
          “the muzzle in place, the chains permanently attached.” I believe we will see it within the next 30 years…the mechanisms are already in place, and we are either not seeing, or so scared that we are accepting.

          Reply
        • avery

           /  September 14, 2011

          wow! talk about an ‘over-reaction’!

          this woman was NOT arrested, her liberties were not limited and her rights were fully intact.

          if she really believes all that — then get a lawyer and let’s see what happens.

          i doubt very seriously, she will get far. (but hey — go for it!!!!)
          many of us, of ALL backgrounds have been through similar circumstances since 9-11 and respect and honor the work of Homeland Security.

          If some of you would actually learn how many horrific acts of terrorism have been thwarted since then — and how many thousands of lives have been saved — you would be singing a different tune.

          Oh…and let me guess. None of YOUR relatives had a full-bodied airliner smash into their office 10 years ago or had to choose between burning alive or jumping 85 stories to concrete below.
          Just a guess.

          (you may want to listen to betty ong’s 911 call from that day — just to get a taste of what she and so many others endured)

          How do you know not EVERY single passenger and flight attendant was concerned about these men and their behavior?
          Maybe this woman’s non-action when it was obvious to everyone else something was amiss….raised a red flag.

          The fact that THIS woman may have been doing EXACTLY what you seem to detest “sitting by and doing NOTHING” — while they very well could have been trying to blow up the plane — speaks volumes about your own bias.

          You see — it works BOTH ways — except sometimes — common sense (Thank God!) prevails.

          Reply
          • Allison

             /  September 14, 2011

            Please post links to stories of passengers of all ethnicities, especially ones that are different from Ms. Shebshi’s, being handcuffed, detained, strip searched, and interrogated for hours before being released.

            Please post some information about acts of terrorism that have been prevented with the use of these techniques. Surely there are some?

            Do not dishonor the 9/11 dead by invoking their names to justify the actions here. You cheapen their death by using them in that fashion.

            Reply
      • Gino

         /  September 13, 2011

        So very painfully true.

        Reply
      • Diane

         /  September 13, 2011

        In defense of the authorities, if it weren’t for them taking action when there is suspicion, we would probably have a LOT MORE terror in this country. Because people would KNOW, that we are too laid back and they could get away with terrorizing our country more than they do now. I’m sorry for what happened to Shoshana, but if it were me I would not have known that the authorities were just doing their jobs.

        Reply
        • Andrea

           /  September 13, 2011

          Diane, although I disagree with you, I would be willing to consider this argument if the “authorities” could provide a shred of evidence that this type of abuse of power and harassment of American citizens actually prevented real terrorism.

          Reply
          • Heywood

             /  September 13, 2011

            Why are you blaming “the authorities???” In this instance, they were simply RESPONDERS. It was the PASSENGERS ON THE PLANE who fingered that row of “suspicious looking characters”–the authorities were only acting on information they received. Would you prefer that the “authorities” ignore all reports, because some of them may have come from idiots who let their prejudices inform their decisions?

            Reply
            • Allison

               /  September 13, 2011

              I would prefer that people responding to a report do what police officers do when they receive a report – ask many questions of the REPORTER to determine the validity of the report BEFORE questioning the accused. Cops don’t interrogate in this manner every single person against whom a report is made, and Homeland Security shouldn’t, either.

              And I would prefer the questioning not violate someone’s Constitutional right against unreasonable search and seizure, and the right for the accused to face his or her accuser.

              Reply
              • Erylin

                 /  September 13, 2011

                bravo

                Reply
              • Agreeing with Allison completely. Well stated.

                Reply
              • Lizabeth

                 /  September 13, 2011

                Well said Allison. While reading the original blog i imagined myself as her. If i am who i am now, but with darker skin, I would still want those basic protections. I wonder if this (my) country would still be like it is today if the attackers on 9/11 had been caucasian. just saying that we would be enraged that our mothers/daughters/sisters were being strip searched. And before people spout off on this about “they shouldnt come to this country”…neither should you or your ancestors…this country is meant for all and the way our government is running it now even native americans are being targeted and searched…they were here before ANY of us.

                Reply
              • Chance

                 /  September 13, 2011

                Allison, you are wrong. The crew and pilot had to make the decision that there might be suspicious activity on the plane. The cops going into that situation, of course would protect themselves and those onboard. Think about this….they are going into a plane blindly. If indeed there was a terrorist and they went to question them, do you think maybe the terrorist could have overpowered the cop? Now the terrorist has a gun and a plane and boom….everybody is dead and 9/11 is relived. Cops can detain you for whatever reason. It is charging unwrongfully is the problem. In this situation, no one was charged with a crime. It’s better to be safe than sorry. It is sad she had to go through this, but it was because of everybody’s paranoia aboard the plane. The authorities are not at fault.

                Reply
              • laars

                 /  September 13, 2011

                hey ally sometimes there isnt enough time to have dinner with everybody and ask questions like in a who dun-it movie. that day there were threats of “something” happening so the responders weren’t waiting.

                Reply
              • Mary

                 /  September 13, 2011

                You are so right.

                Reply
              • Naren

                 /  September 13, 2011

                Exactly. Did someone consider the plane had not blown up or hijacked yet? Hello, Good Morning? It did land safely even with those three brown terrorists conspiring all the time and two of them spending a little more time in the bathroom than usual (and returning back to their seats without guns or bombs in their hands) . Did these ‘Authorities’ consider nothing was done by anyon eto thwart their (our ‘terrosisits’) efforts, but just some ‘suspicious’ activity reported; so it cannot be ‘as’ serious?

                So even if this was reported, this could have been handled in a completely different way. There’s no point in subjecting them to such such cells and treatments. They have handed over their information to you, did not blow up the plan when they were sitting together and conspiring, so will not do it when they’re in your facility surrounded by all half the military. Do your investigation and treat them respectfully. If you say 50 such incidents were reported through the day, be mature enough to consider this could be another of those and handle it well!

                Hilarious, Foolish, Shameful!

                Reply
              • Gump

                 /  September 13, 2011

                I agree with this, as long as it’s possible, and in this case it was.

                Reply
              • Concerned US Citizen

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Indeed, Allison. When a magician performs a magic trick, they use some diversion so that peoples’ eyes don’t catch the magic in the trick. Maybe the accuser was diverting the attention off of themselves onto these three people. I think it only fair that the reporter should have been detained and interrogated, too, and also these three people need to be able to confront this accuser.

                Reply
                • avery

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  maybe this woman’s protesting is a “diversion” to what she was really up to.
                  So far, she’s been caught in a number of different lies.
                  (look up homeland security reports for december 2010 — what she said happened then – did not happen).
                  she admits her husband tried to bring a weapon on a plane and mocked security when they failed to find it.

                  she’s not very good at covering her motives. i’m sure it’s obvious to others, as well, which is why she will be targeted and followed for the rest of her life — THANK GOD!!

                  Reply
              • avery

                 /  September 14, 2011

                you mean, like the “crew”? which includes the pilots and flight attendants?

                “after the CREW REPORTED that two people were spending “an extraordinarily long time” in a bathroom, Frontier spokesman Peter Kowalchuck said.”

                The CREW reported it – the CREW (not some “random” passengers) – the TRAINED CREW!

                you really need a LESSON in flight protocol and Homeland Security — you seem to be the ONLY person flying who doesn’t seem to understand that what the CREW SAYS goes…..no matter what.
                If you don’t like it — don’t fly.

                (you can always exercise you constitutional right to VOTE and lobby and get folks elected who share your belief — but something tells me you like to complain too much to actually do anything about what you like to complain about — an affliction many who have nothing better to do seem to have)

                Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  Apparently the crew needs better training, since none of the 50 or so people identified as “acting suspiciously” on 9/11/11 (according to the reports I’ve read, and including Ms. Shebshi) were found to be guilty of anything.

                  I think there’s a middle ground between “the crew can say anything and they will be believed no matter what” and “nobody can report anything ever.” I would like to see that middle ground include having the crew making the report have to provide specific and reasonable grounds for their suspicions, grounds that are more concrete than “I thought he was in the bathroom too long.”

                  I have voted in every federal, state, and local election since I was 18. I also frequently lobby for political causes and candidates that share my beliefs. But then again, I don’t have to justify my beliefs or my participation in this discussion to anyone, including you.

                  Reply
            • Val

               /  September 13, 2011

              Thank you! Now that actually makes sense.

              Reply
            • Dave

               /  September 14, 2011

              And it was the pilot who called in the “army” after being notified of the suspicions. The pilot is in complete charge of the aircraft, if the pilot says you don’t fly then you don’t fly.

              Reply
          • Tom Lange

             /  September 13, 2011

            Unfortunately, history suggests that it does. Not that I defend it, or believe it, but the camps that Asian Americans were put into on the West Coast-were done to prevent an attack. They can look back and say: “It worked, didn’t it?”

            People defend the atrocity that is the Patriot Act, and argue that we haven’t had any terrorist attacks since, and reason that Bush did a good job…

            -Of course, the number of terrorist attacks in this country is so small that it makes a 10 year window completely meaningless. Some people will find meaning it it, however…

            Reply
            • Joe Jericho

               /  September 14, 2011

              The ironic thing with this is that as the 2012 election gets closer, the Obama supporters will make the same argument about “keeping the country safe”. We are screwed by both parties on this point. :(

              Reply
          • Shelly

             /  September 13, 2011

            For one thing, No one can prevent terrorism but the proof is in the pudding to coin a phrase…We have had ZERO terrorists attacks since 9/11 because of the publics awareness & reports coupled with our Authorities responding quickly & thoroughly! So you must consider this argument by your own words. The world has changed and ignoring evil isn’t an option, our Government has the obligation to Protect ALL of its citizens. So “For the greater good” becomes one of thee most important points for all of us to remember and understand. With this information I hope our government learns from this incident and improves the system for our civil rights and our protection too.

            Reply
        • Ian

           /  September 13, 2011

          Actually, that’s quite backward and wrong.

          See, the purpose of terrorism is to cause exactly this. “Terrorism” isn’t about killing people — it’s about terrorizing. That’s why it’s called “terrorism” and not “killing-people-ism.”

          Killing people is a means to an end. The end is to destroy a society, by breaking down the rule of law and social contract. And we do this better than any other nation on Earth. We’ve gone from a light unto the nations, a place which may not have always done the right thing, but was always on the right path, to a place that is an example of a police state, a cautionary tale to other nations. And why? Because we have reacted in exactly the way that al Qaeda was hoping.

          In doing so, we’ve proven that we are a PERFECT target for terrorism. A terrorist who attacks the United States gets EXACTLY the goal they want: a repressive, over-zealous, fascist security force which destroys the freedom and liberty that this country once had.

          Once upon a time, people thought that “freedom” was a thing that you were willing to risk your life to fight for. This country was founded on the notion that you had to risk your security to guarantee your freedom — and that that is a bargain well worth making.

          Now? We trade in all our freedom for a tiny bit of security, the act of a craven coward. And we harm other people in the process.

          I am ashamed to be a citizen of a country where three people could be detained like that, because someone was afraid. Terrorism requires people to be terrified.

          And the people who are terrified are craven. And willing to harm their fellow citizens because of their own terror.

          Reply
          • TheCrapMan

             /  September 13, 2011

            Ian,

            A perfect take on the situation.

            Reply
          • Ralph Baker

             /  September 13, 2011

            Ian, If you are ashamed to be an American Citizen, You have the right to LEAVE on the next thing smokin`. I don`t agree with a lot of what happened in Detroit and I also have no solution to offer. Our lives as Americans have changed considerably in the last 10 years. I will still stand behind the troops and my Commander -in -Chief, whom I diagree with on many levels, because it is my Duty as an American to do so. I have rights and Freedoms due to the every day Heroism of the troops that protect me. If your ashamed, find a Country that you can contribue to and get on the next flight. You will not be missed.

            R.B.

            Reply
          • Michele W.

             /  September 13, 2011

            Very good observation about the cost of freedom, I may just have to repost that!

            Reply
          • Glenn

             /  September 13, 2011

            I Put my mom, my sister or daughter in this position and I am horrified! !
            I am a 4th generation American, and what ever words this poor helpless scared women used about redneks and beer bellies in venting, was in far better taste than I would use. WE THE PEOPLE are terrorizing our own people

            Reply
          • JenRo

             /  September 13, 2011

            couldnt say it better myself! really.

            Reply
          • ian,

            Extremely well articulated and very accurate, in my opinion. I am ashamed of what happened to Soshana and what she had to endure. The Patriot Act is unpatriotic and those who deny this are looking at the world with blinders on. Something is not better than nothing if any crackpot or bigot can see to it that innocent citizens are stripped of their rights in the name of security. We are no more secure, merely a terrorized nation that has failed to learn from history. Many of these comments make it obvious that too many of us consider propaganda fact.

            Reply
          • Lara

             /  September 13, 2011

            Well said, Ian. Very well said. I particularly like the distinction between “terrorism” – causing terror, and “killing-people-ism” – causing the death of people. When did we decide that our freedoms, as Americans, weren’t worth it anymore?

            I am so sorry about what happened, to you Ms. Hebshi, and to the many others whose stories have not been told. I am reminded of this poetic quote by the German Pastor Martin Niemoller:

            First they came for the communists, and I did not speak out–
            because I was not a communist;
            Then they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out–
            because I was not a socialist;
            Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out–
            because I was not a trade unionist;
            Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out–
            because I was not a Jew;
            Then they came for me–
            and there was no one left to speak out for me.

            …and I wonder, as Americans sixty years later, who are the groups we silently watch be persecuted? Are we asking ourselves ‘who will be left when they come for me?’ In closing, I ask, when will we, as a collective conscience for America, find our voice and remember when freedom came with a price?

            Reply
          • Thank you Ian. Well said.

            Reply
          • Mister Aloha

             /  September 14, 2011

            One question to all you that feel America was wrong (searching Shebhi) did any of you loose a family or friend in the 9-11 tragedy? Did all those people ask to die the way the did? NO! I am sorry she had to go through that, but like she said herself, “I won’t be flying on 9-11 any more.”
            Hello?! It’s the 10th anniversary and she wonder’s why? They were on heightened security…..what does that mean to you??? There was evidence that there were plans to do something on the anniversary??!! Hello?! You folks seem NOT to be listening. A thief but comes in the night. If you knew when the thief was coming, then no more burglaries….If we knew when terrorist was going to hit, no problem……but we don’t so we have to be very cautious……..I am truly sorry this happended to you (Shebhi) but this is not the seventies or sixties…we are at WAR! We need to keep ALL Americans safe from harm……our military is over seas to keep us safe and to keep our freedom…..FREEDOM IS NOT FREE!

            Reply
            • Johnathane Dorane

               /  September 16, 2011

              Mister Aloha,

              I did not loose a friend or family member on 9-11, but I did loose one in Oklahoma City. Does that give me credibility? Now I have some questions for you.

              Did the unwarented detainment of Shebhi bring back any of the lives that were lost on 9/11?

              Did the unwarented strip search of Shebhi reveal any evidence that will stop a future terrorist attack?

              Did the unwarrented interrogation of Shebhi provide any information that will lead to the dissruption of future terrorist plots?

              Did the fingerprinting of Shebhi reduce the risk of a future terrorist attack?

              Is it your opinion that only people who lost a loved one on 9/11 have any say on the matter of national security?

              If you are to scared to get on a plane without having the SS watch over anything, then you can drive, take a bus or train, or even walk. After all, flying is not a right.

              Reply
          • Concerned US Citizen

             /  September 14, 2011

            Good thoughts, Ian.

            Reply
          • Tony

             /  September 14, 2011

            Ian two thumbs up, you are on point.

            Reply
          • Joe Jericho

             /  September 14, 2011

            Well done, Ian. Again, not sure if we would agree on much politically, who knows, but this is pretty much spot on.

            Reply
          • Silly

             /  September 14, 2011

            “He who sacrifices freedom for security deserves neither.” -Benjamin Franklin.

            Not that people who argue for racial profiling and abusing people who aren’t white will aknowledge this guy. Clearly, Franklin was an arab terrorist in disguise!

            The one nation on earth that reacted well to terrorism was norway. Scores of people dead: No fascist laws passed.

            Reply
          • jen

             /  September 14, 2011

            sooooooo over-thought.

            few people are ‘terrorized’ here that i know of. I fly all the time and don’t feel at all “terrorized”. no one I know feels “terrorized”

            What I do feel….is SAFE!

            I feel FREE and GRATEFUL to be an American and have an abundance of freedoms.

            I’m grateful for the security we have in place — i’ve been singled out, too (searches, extra security, etc….and i’m not being profiled…i’m being screened. see, i’m not biased in my own thinking)

            I consider it a minor inconvenience…..as there are MORE important things in life….like….LIVING!
            (and not being bogged down by over-analyzing flight security).

            This was a one-off occurrence (and it happened on the 10th anniversary of 9-11) and the flight crew acted out of an abundance of caution -
            i hardly consider ONE time in TEN years being “terrorized” by fear.

            sheesh!!

            Reply
            • Allison

               /  September 14, 2011

              Searches and extra security are not the equivalent of being handcuffed and removed from a plane, detained for hours without communication, strip searched (and likely cavity searched, based on Ms Shebshi’s statements), and interrogated. That is not a minor inconvenience. It does not matter that this “only” happened once to Ms. Shebshi, since racial profiling is not acceptable.

              Reply
        • Diane, I agree with you, it is necessary . If the plane would have been blown up the families of the dead would be very upset and screaming bloody murder, so if you don’t like it don’t fly

          Reply
          • Allison

             /  September 13, 2011

            Surrendering our Constitutional rights to the fear of a bigoted minority is not the answer.

            Reply
            • Shelly

               /  September 13, 2011

              Everyone forgets, Flying is NOT a constitutional right, it is optional! If you dont like the security requirements, then don’t fly. But as soon as the Government fails to see something coming or the citizens just believe they didnt do enough after a disaster (ie: Katrina) then everyone is up in arms complaining, calling for congressional witch hunts and wanting the government to answer/pay for its mistakes! Since the very beginning of this Republic, the founding fathers DID delegate the responsibility of Defense & Security to our Government! Our Government was not sopose to be in the business of feeding, housing and taking care of its citizens, those are individual, community & local responsibilities! But Defense and Security is solely the Governments responsiblity!

              Reply
            • John

               /  September 13, 2011

              At no point were Constitutional rights ever surrendered. When you board an airplane, you are agreeing to the terms and conditions the airlines have described on the back of the ticket. Flying is not a right, it is a privilege. There is nothing in the bill of rights that says every person in America has the right to fly commercial.

              It is a simple decision for anyone to make, if you do not agree with the measures the airline security and authorities are allowed to take then DO NOT FLY COMMERCIAL.

              Also, unfortunately you can not pick a different airline, because every carrier has to conform to the same rules set out by the different Government organizations.

              To that end, I do not ever want to be singled out like Shoshana was. It is degrading and humiliating. But, let us be honest with ourselves. How many times have you thought that a package looked suspicious? Or that somehow that person looked suspicious in your neighborhood? These are reactions that we have been taught to think, because they are healthy for human preservation.

              We can sit here and argue about whether the assumptions of the crew of the airplane were warranted or not. But what it really comes down to is the question of whether the Pros outweigh the Cons. The crew cannot be afraid to make decisions like this when the entire plane is at risk.

              Reply
            • Dave

               /  September 14, 2011

              so if you don’t like it don’t fly

              Reply
              • Allison

                 /  September 14, 2011

                That is also not the answer.

                Reply
                • jen

                   /  September 14, 2011

                  so…if you don’t like it….change it.

                  you won’t, because you know you are wrong.

                  (or maybe for you…it’s too easy to complain)

                  Reply
                  • Allison

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Actually, I believe I am right, and I vote and participate in the political process in order to attempt to change it.

                    Reply
          • Floyd

             /  September 13, 2011

            Don’t you think that if these people were going to blow the plane up they would have done it before they were yanked off of the plane? Why go to all the trouble to board an airplane with an explosive, only to be detained after the flight lands and is quarantined? The time to stop a terrorist is not after the plane lands. Terrorists may not be entitled to legal representation, but these people were. Being suspected of something, no matter how evil, does not trump the Constitutional rights and protections that were violated on that day. The people running this country are idiots.

            Reply
          • Finisterre

             /  September 13, 2011

            I suspect, Sally, that if you had been hauled off a plane, arrested and strip-searched because someone thought you’d gone to the toilet a few too many times, you would be ‘very upset and screaming bloody murder’ about your Constitutional rights, not concluding that ‘not flying’ was a sensible response.

            Reply
          • “Baaaaaa! Baaaaaaa!”

            Reply
          • Steve Bock

             /  September 13, 2011

            Sally,

            I hope that you are “detained” for our general and unspecified safety in the near future. Might give you some perspective on the supposed necessity of false arrest, unlawful detention, and criminal mistreatment.

            Reply
          • “if you don’t like it don’t fly” = terrorism wins again. This process is the wrong way to go about offering any protection from terrorism. If American citizens can be detained for hours, strip searched, apparently body cavity searched, and questioned without probable cause other than the word of another person who is suspect of their activities, then terrorism can chalk up another goal. At the very least, they should have a search warrant for the strip search and body cavity search.
            What did they expect to find on these people who had already been through the TSA checkpoint before they got onto the plane.
            Detaining a suspected person AFTER their flight has landed is very poor and very late security. If they were going to do something, don’t you think the misdeed would already have been accomplished?
            I’m all for profiling before people get into a plane and before the flight, Pull anyone aside that stands out from the profiling and question them further. I am against the current TSA and Homeland Security policies that are in place right now. In my opinion, the authorities here have trashed the Constitution with their processes for trying to find any would be terrorists.

            Reply
          • David

             /  September 13, 2011

            The plane had already landed at its destination, so I don’t get where you’re going with that assumption. What’s necessary is for the authorities to actually conduct an investigation into the accusations, and not assume that the reports are accurate just because you have some people who don’t appear the way someone believed Americans should look. The threat was long over once the flight had landed. That was the time to test the veracity of the accuser, not ramp up the violations of the rights of those accused with what we now know was no basis in fact. I’m betting that if this were you, you’d have a very different take on one surrendering their civil rights for the sake of the unsubstantiated accusations of others.

            Reply
          • Jess

             /  September 14, 2011

            If you require human rights violations in order to help you feel more comfortable, it is YOU who shouldn’t fly.

            Reply
        • redheadwglasses

           /  September 13, 2011

          Dear Diane,

          We don’t need more people like you in this country. Kindly leave. Thank you in advance for your cooperation.

          Love,
          Reasonable people who aren’t xenophobes

          p.s. not every non-white is a “foreigner.” True story.

          Reply
          • Joe

             /  September 13, 2011

            Is this what the face of tolerant liberalism looks like, redheadwglasses? You don’t agree with me, so leave? You’re a “xenophobe,” so leave so that we can have a uninformly tolerant society?

            I think Diane was making a reasonable point, and that point is that sometimes a vigorous response is necessary to prevent violence, save lives and protect public servants. This isn’t always the case, and invariably mistakes are made and it takes too long to sort out that everything is okay. In the meantime, innocent people are inconvenienced, even scared. That’s something we should strive to eliminate but can never totally end in a world in which there are bad and good people who can be mistaken for one another in the heat of a moment.

            Someone else said in this post that when police respond to a complaint, they ask questions of the complaintaint first before questioning the suspect, and in a situation in which there is clearly no threat to the officer or the public, this is certainly the case. But if an officer is summoned to a scene in which a reasonable person, lacking first-hand context, could construe poses an imminent threat of violence, I can assure you the officer will secure the suspect and perhaps even the complaintant until he or she can sort out what’s really going on.

            It’s well established law, and common sense, that police have the right and in many cases the responsibility to secure and restrain suspects for their own safety and that of the public, the suspect and any victims.

            So I’m not going to get very riled up about this. Why? Because our system is better than *their* system, as flawed as it may be.

            In our system, we investigate facts and release detained individuals with an apology and a ride back to their car.

            In other systems, don’t have the freedom to live Tweet their detention on suspicion of terrorism, suspects are beaten mercilessly until they confess to crimes they did not commit, are simply charged and convicted in sham show trials or summarily executed without so much as consideration of guilt or innocence merely because they are come from the “wrong” part of the world or believe in the “wrong” God. These things happen here, too, but they are the exception, not the rule.

            Our system is not perfect. It bears the constant vigilance of an educated citizenry to prevent the inevitable excesses of power from gaining irreversible hold on our freedoms. And it must be protected from the paranoid and misinformed imaginings of a terrified people.

            But our system of law enforcement and justice does not deserve to be villified and pilloried for responding and investigating and coming to a reasonable and lawful conclusion that no laws were broken, for apologizing for causing an inconvience and for releasing a detained individual as quickly as possible.

            This incident, as frightening and instructive as it is for both the writer and law enforcement (and there are lessons for both), is not indicative of a system run amok, but is rather evidence that ours is a system in which laws, not the prejudices of men, ultimately triumph.

            I’m sorry for the writer’s inconveniences, and I’d like to think I’m wordly enough that I would not have mistaken the innocent bathroom habits of two foreigners for a mortal threat.

            But it’s hard for me to say exactly how I might respond when, 35,000 feet in the sky, with the ominous warnings of a credible terrorist threat issued by my democratically elected government thundering in my head, I am faced something out of the ordinary as the sweet face of my 4-year-old son and my wife flash through my mind.

            I’m sorry for the inconvience and fear this woman and these two gentlemen suffered. In a perfect world, I’d wish it on no one. At the same time, I can’t fault the public servants who also just wanted to go home to their own families and who apparently worked diligently to clear these individuals and send them on their way.

            Reply
        • Maybe, but this is merely conjecture on your part without foundation? What if everyone on every plane points a finger at each other everywhere? So does it make it right for everyone to be strip searched all over this country? What I’m saying is someone falsely stated that “suspicious activity” was taking place when this was not the case by this ladies statements here which seem very valid. It does have the appearance of being tied to skin color which is profiling and that is wrong. Did they strip search the person that made those statements? This could amount to a hate crime. They clearly landed the plane without incident right??? Did a strip search have to be conducted over less measures that would prove her innocence? Its clear she was guilty by the strip search and not being givin’ information about why she was being taken from the getgo.
          I’m somewhat surprised at your answer but I’ll bet you haven’t been stripped searched without being given a reason why. When it happens to you, you’ll know how this woman felt.

          Reply
        • Jim R

           /  September 13, 2011

          Detention and strip searches based on accusation and innuendo. Hmmmm… we’re reverting back to the Salem Witch Trial days, or so it would seem.

          Reply
        • Sorry, Diane – but we do have a lot of terrorism in this country, the majority of it domestic terrorism carried out with handguns.

          Reply
        • Liz

           /  September 13, 2011

          Really, Diane? Really? If we didn’t strip-search innocent CITIZENS for NO REASON, we’d have more terror attacks? Can you point me to some information that says that the naked photos and genital groping that we are subject to every time we fly has actually caught would-be terrorists? ‘Cause so far TSA hasn’t advertised anything about actually stopping terrorists. Your reaction is EXACTLY the proof that the terrorists have won, because you would be just fine with being imprisoned and strip-searched for no reason. They have won because people like you think it is OK to subject innocent people to such degradation. They have won because you are OK with the fact that we have lost our freedoms in the name of “security.”

          Reply
        • Whilst I agree that others who may have ideas about committing acts of terrorism may be discouraged due to the heavy security activities that have been active for the last decade, I do think that this is the only way in which terrorism is thwarted by this system.
          I am reasonably sure that she should have at least been responded to before she was taken to the security office and been informed why she was being detained by the police in handcuffs. Pretty sure everyone has the right to have the answer to that.
          I am an Aussie and something I find interesting is that when we go to the the airport I always seem to be “randomly” targeted for bomb or illegal substance testing (for anyone that does not have this it is a non-evasive procedure where they simply rub some cloth over your hands, clothes and lining of your bag and test it). I am the furthest thing from “suspicious” you can imagine, I have asked why I always seem to be approached for this, mostly I am just told it is random. Then my friend started dating a guy that works for customs and he said it is because I look non-threatening, like I wouldn’t make a fuss and that they are discouraged from approaching people of Arab appearance or women wearing cultural clothing as it might cause an incident of accusations of racism. Interesting!!! They would rather not cause a scene and risk a bomb getting on the plane all for a simple swab test. This was around the same time that an informant let the police know that they believed a person dressed in a burqa would conceal explosives under the garment and would target a “hub” in Sydney city.
          I am so so sorry for what happened to you, it was just WRONG, plain and simple. You have every right to feel violated and I hope that the support of your friends and family helps you through this time.

          Reply
        • There apparently has developed a fine line between “preventing terrorism” by acting from suspicion, and perpetrating said same in the name of protection from suspicion. I think we as Americans must be just as vigilant against the erosion of our rights and freedoms as we are against the terrorists who try to do great damage to our country. Otherwise, we will end up doing their work for them. I believe Shoshana’s experience was a terribly unfortunate example of the authorities accomplishing just that. Those of us who are, or who look, white, are not inclined to reflect back on our history at what the authorities have considered to be meet and seemly behavior, “just doing their jobs”. Ask one of our Native American or African American (and there are other groups as well) what “acting on suspicion” meant to them. Ask an African American today what “Driving While Black” means to them. How we strike the balance is an extremely difficult thing. But the “LOT MORE” terror in this country could start to come from those very authorities in whose hands we place way too much room for interpretation. Sitting idly by, in the name of “the authorities were just doing their jobs” and watching the Shoshanas of our American family be mistreated is unacceptable. Where do you propose we draw the line for that?

          Reply
        • Penny

           /  September 13, 2011

          I agree. Maybe if they had done this 10 years ago we wouldn’t have lost thousands of people to a senseless act. Unfortunately terrorists don’t wear a sign saying they are a terrorist and the authorities have to guess. It’s sad because even women and children can be a terrorist among the radical groups. I’m sorry Shoshana had to experience this but it was for the safety of thousands. We are not disturbed by events but by the view we take of the events.

          Reply
          • Yoko

             /  September 14, 2011

            I don’t think what happened to this innocent woman kept anyone safe. I don’t see how violating the rights of innocent Americans keeps people from being killed. I guess I’m just confused.

            Reply
          • Concerned US Citizen

             /  September 14, 2011

            I think you are missing a big fact here, Penny. Shoshana did not do anything that even hinted at probable cause, besides the parents she chose. How did you choose your parents, Penny?

            Hitler wanted to get rid of all dark people, too. You know, it’s all about color and how people act. Just ask Timothy McVeigh.

            Reply
          • Johnathane Dorane

             /  September 16, 2011

            Maybe if they had waited until the plane landed safely, directed it to move away from the terminal after it had already been there, boarded the plane with a SWAt team, and detained three people who had not done aything related to terrorism. I guess it would have worked if the criminals on 9/11 had decided to forget their plan and allow the plane to land safely. Of course, if they did that then they would not have committed any crime as the possesion of box cutters was not against the rules of flying at that time.

            “Unfortunately terrorists don’t wear a sign saying they are a terrorist and the authorities have to guess.”

            Are you really comfortable with the authorities simply guessing as a reason to detain, strip-search, interrogate, and fingerprint random people?

            Reply
          • Johnathane Dorane

             /  September 16, 2011

            It took me a minute to grasp the implications of your statement, so I will have to post a second time.

            “Unfortunately terrorists don’t wear a sign saying they are a terrorist and the authorities have to guess.”

            since terrorist are criminals I can change that one word and the meaning changes.

            Unfortunately criminals don’t wear a sign saying they are a criminals and the authorities have to guess.

            So if an authority guesses I am a murderer, I get hauled in, strip searched, interrogated, fingerprinted, and if this produces no evidence against me released with an appology. No probable cause required?

            So if an authority guesses I am a theif, I get hauled in, strip searched, interrogated, fingerprinted, and if this produces no evidence against me released with an appology. No probable cause required?

            Reply
        • Chris

           /  September 13, 2011

          amen to that

          Reply
        • thankful

           /  September 13, 2011

          So happy to see someone else agreed with the opinion I had

          Reply
        • Alice

           /  September 13, 2011

          Diane, it is a matter of HOW action is taken. I agree with Scojam that this is a systematic process by which we are gradually desensitized into compliance for our “safety”. There are ways to interrogate or question people that do not violate their rights as US citizens.

          Reply
        • i agree diane! tough shit! these people are doing their jobs, and I’m thankful for it. if it were me I would be grateful that they were on alert, and not be whining about security measures put in place to protect the American people! if you don’t like it, then next time drive!!!

          Reply
          • blb

             /  September 13, 2011

            Tb, you would never be in the situation that Shoshana was in–I’m guessing you are Caucasian). And security measures are not effective if they violate human rights.

            Reply
          • Joe

             /  September 14, 2011

            TB, the problem is that they were NOT doing their jobs CORRECTLY!
            They abused their discretion and I’m willing to bet that if Shoshana were to consult with an Attorney, she will be successful in suing the Agents involved.

            Perhaps, everytime I do a car stop for someone going through a stop sign, I should immediately pull them out of their car, search them, handcuff them, take them back to the station and strip search them. After all, they do present a threat to me, since I have to approach the car and I don’t know if they are armed with a weapon or not.

            The people on the airplane at the very least have gone through a magnatometer to check them for weapons. Their bags were at the very least x-rayed. Their carry on was x-rayed as well so the probability that the people on the airplane having a weapon is extremely low.

            On the other hand, the people that I pull over, have not been searched. Not knowing if they have a weapon can be freightening.

            I think from now on, anyone going through a traffic light, stop sign or speeding will immediately be hadcuffed and strip searched to ensure my safety. At least the people I will be strip searching have done something wrong unlike Shoshana who was just sitting in her seat and minding her own business. I wonder how long I will be keeping my job? Gee, do you think TSA would hire me? I will be an experienced searcher!

            Reply
          • VoiceOfReason

             /  September 14, 2011

            And when more people start driving due to the inconveniences of flying, the terrorists will start using car bombs.

            What then? Military checkpoints between states? Required travel plans to be filed with the National Transportation Safety Board, under their newly expanded powers via the Anti-vehicular Terror Act?

            And then when that fails to curb car bombs, what then? Strip search at public parking facilities?

            “Vere Are Your Papers?”

            Reply
          • VoiceOfReason

             /  September 14, 2011

            Right. So when the terrorists finally decide that flying is too much of a hassle, and that they’ve won that front, the car bombings will start.

            What then? Military checkpoints at all state borders? Travel plans filed between states with the National Transportation Safety Board, using it’s newly expanded powers under the Anti-vehicle Terrorism Act?

            Where does it end? “Vere Are Your Papers?”

            Reply
        • Ketil

           /  September 14, 2011

          Because, as we all know, there are no other ways of conducting terror than blowing up an airplane, after it has parked, on the ground, at its destination.

          It isn’t possible to buy an automatic rifle, and kill dozens of people at a political youth camp, nor to blow up subway systems, trains, or simply run a lot of people over with a car?

          Are you seriously suggesting that confiscating toothpaste at airports deters or prevents any of this? Is fertilizer only sold from the trolley aboard aircrafts in your country? If not, why aren’t we seeing a lot more terrorism? Where are all the suicide bombers?

          The fact is that, in spite of the wars incited by America and it allies that have cost half to a million (mostly muslim) lives, there are very, very few people eager to sacrifice themselves in terrorist attacks, and approximately nobody with the means and faculties to pull off anything more than an IED in their own Iraqi or Afghan neighborhood.

          All of the so-called security is part paranoia, and part theater for the paranoid.

          Reply
        • Torus

           /  September 15, 2011

          It’s becoming clear to me that the public at large may not even know what “terror” means. Terror is fear. Terrorists attempt to make people fearful. Killing people is simply a means to an end, not the end result.

          This country is terrified of being “terrorized”, so it just accepts these heightened security measures and subtractions of our inalienable rights without assuming anything bad will come of it, and also support the waging of a war against an idea (what in the world is a “war on terror”, anyway?).

          By definition of “terror”, there is a LOT of it in this country. We are terrified of something that has little chance of actually happening when the serious threat in this country is an accident on the freeway. And, in this respect, al-Qaeda has succeeded.

          Reply
      • Dr. "K"

         /  September 13, 2011

        Amen to that Dallas…

        Reply
      • John

         /  September 13, 2011

        So, this is the land of the free and the home of the brave?

        Reply
        • Liz

           /  September 13, 2011

          Not any more, especially given that so many people are posting here that the authorities and the idiot who reported “suspicious” behavior did the right thing and are protecting us from evil.

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        • Ken

           /  September 14, 2011

          More like the land of the willingly oppressed and home of the chicken. Which, I take it, is your point. Liberty is not for lily-livered sheep who are all too eager to surrender freedom for a (false) sense of security.
          But this does not mean the terrorists have won, as some have suggested. Rather, it means that we have met the enemy–and he is us (apologies to Walt Kelly). Or, as was famously said at another time, in the face of a different sort of threat, “We have nothing to fear, but fear itself.” Seems like a lot of people have forgotten that lesson.

          Reply
        • Concerned US Citizen

           /  September 14, 2011

          Not anymore.

          Reply
      • penny

         /  September 13, 2011

        maybe if authoritites acted like this on the true 9/11 – 9/11 would of never of happened – hats off to the authoritites for protecting us -

        Reply
      • Steven

         /  September 13, 2011

        I think that what happened to Shoshana is absolutely horrible. It is very unfortunate that she had to go through such a traumatic and embarrassing event. However, I do believe that our governments security tactics since 9/11/2001, no matter how potentially unfair they have been, have been largely successful in protecting our country from further terrorist attacks in the 10 years since 9/11.

        Reply
        • Johnathane Dorane

           /  September 16, 2011

          “traumatic and embarrassing event”

          Is that another way of saying terrorising event?

          “I do believe that our governments security tactics since 9/11/2001, no matter how potentially unfair they have been, have been largely successful in protecting our country from further terrorist attacks in the 10 years since 9/11.”

          Do you have any evidence of this? Which aspects of the “governments security tactics” have been so successful? I am open to changing my view if presented with new information, so please provide support for you opinion in the form of facts and data.

          Reply
      • Gopal

         /  September 13, 2011

        well said.

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      • Don Barnhart

         /  September 13, 2011

        And what if dangerous items were found? How would you feel then?
        Myself I would be glad the airlines reacted.

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      • Bob A.

         /  September 13, 2011

        It’s funny how people were not so suspicious of 20 something, white, anglo, christian men after the Oklahoma City bombing. That murderer killed hundreds of men, women, and children, but the residual racist paranoia was not there. The matter is that the media, through their use of such phrases as “Islamic Extremists” caused this sort of paranoia. Why did they not refer to McVey as “Anglo-Christian Extremist”? It is tag lines like this that lead folks to the kind of paranoia profiling that will probably be around for a long time. It is also the reason that young afro-americans cannot walk down the street at night, without someone crossing the street to get away from them. I don’t believe that we are all racists. But, unfortunately, “we are what we hear”.

        Reply
      • You are absolutely right. We will win the war against terrorism when our lives return back to what they were on September 10, 2001 and when the Homeland Security and TSA ceases to exist. Till that day we have not won the war.

        Best wishes,

        Reply
      • laars

         /  September 13, 2011

        so dallas i guess wait for the explosion to figure out whats going on?

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      • rohlik

         /  September 13, 2011

        the woman who was detained waa unfortunate incident, and she complained about racial profiling but at the same time talked about fat woman and men policeman that were rednecks, is this profiling?????? absouletly, we are so very luck we live in the best country in the world and people who are not comfortable here should leave.

        Reply
        • Hue

           /  September 13, 2011

          What’s wrong with describing someone? Did she said being fat was an awful thing? I don’t think so. I think you are insecure with yourself-like maybe you are fat?

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        • Yoko

           /  September 14, 2011

          Maybe she did throw them into a stereotypical category based on what they looked like, but did she call “the authorities” on them and cause them to be subjected to the humiliation she went through? No. So, it’s probably not fair to call her a hypocrite. Also, I’ll bet she was in the worst mood of her life so I’ll say a little name calling is okay in this situation. And are you suggesting that innocent, decent American citizens whose rights are grossly violated and thereby made “uncomfortable” (an understatement in my opinion), should leave the country that they have a constitutional right to be in because they are unhappy with that kind of treatment? Interesting. Also, she didn’t say anything about hating America or what it should stand for. She just didn’t want to take the abuse she suffered at the hands of paranoid bigots lying down. And by paranoid bigots, I mean the ones who called in the authorities.

          Reply
        • Concerned US Citizen

           /  September 14, 2011

          I think her reply was restrained. She was way too polite in her description of them. You do realize this just happened to her? I would still be too angry about it to even post such a nice reply as she has posted.

          Reply
        • Joe Jericho

           /  September 14, 2011

          She said she was an American, should she leave? Should she go to her father’s homeland and be abused by Saudi men and the Saudi legal system? I agree with your point that she seemed to be engaging in the same behavior she accused them of, but she doesn’t have any power; whereas, those government scum used their power to torment and make her life very difficult. Personally, I don’t think race is the dispositive factor here, but I think she is justified in thinking it may have played a roll and for throwing some anger towards those who did it to her. I can get past that. Can you, or do you want to play a gotchya game with the victim? Perhaps it was her own fault that she got raped. Geez….

          Also, you may want to look up the word immutable.

          Reply
      • Matt

         /  September 13, 2011

        There are those of you who live under this dilusion of peace and understanding through tolerance and love. Then there are those of us who live with the reality of violence and hate on a level that you will hopefully never experience.
        While inconvenient, what happened to the author probably saved lives. These searches and detentions aren’t designed solely to harass the many tribes of the desert. They are designed to detect and DETER suspicious and criminal activity. Reluctantly I feel obligated to mention also that 9/11 was not the only terrorist attack on the U.S. perpetrated by brown skinned individuals who happened to speak Arabic and read the Qur’an. With that said my sympathies are slim to the “racial profiling” problem that we (us redneck, speedboat driving, country music listeners) have. While noticing a car full of white kids in their early 20′s driving slowly through a known drug area may seem like “profiling” to you, to me it seems like college kids trying to score some weed. (marijuana is still illegal in most states by the way)
        Everyone here is free to say whatever we like on any forum we choose. We are also free to practice whatever brand of God we choose, just not at school or work or anywhere anybody who hears or sees you doing it will be offended.(this means all you middle class gun toting republican types) All of these freedoms have been provided to you. I say provided because the majority of you have never appreciated the men and women who have been keeping the wolf away from your doorstep for all these years. Most of you have not served in the military, or gotten ready for work in the morning hoping that at the end of your shift you would still be alive. Neither have you given any thought to how many holidays, childrens birthdays and other hours upon hours these public servants sacrifice to keep your basic human freedoms alive. It is this last reason that makes me less sympathetic to the inconvenience of a few hours of questioning and the humiliation of a strip search.
        Before i climb back on my unicorn and ride off in to my world of kittens and jelly beans let me leave you with another thought. Somewhere in everyone’s not so distant past, an ancester of ours thought it wise to leave what ever shithole, third-world country they were born in to come to America to find a better life. If you feel that they were mistaken, and that we are “getting it all wrong”. By all means travel to what ever land you were descended from. I assure you……..You Will Come Back. (if they dont cut your head off on al jazeera you infidel)

        Reply
      • Mac

         /  September 13, 2011

        10 years is not too long ago. 20 years will be a ceremony instead of a memorial and all will forget what happen. The Terrorists never forget and will be patient enough for the “Americans” to let their guard down. Then, they will strike again. It’s a lose-lose situation no matter what the outcome. Had there been a real terrorist threat and the reaction was not the same, then everyone would be furious for letting something happen. Lucky for us all, there was no terrorist threat and everyone is safe and alive. Protocols have to be in place for protection. Does it suck for some? Yes. Was it racial in nature? Debatable. Wrong place wrong time with suspicious people sitting next to you. Nothing will ever be perfect and some “feelings” will be hurt. No matter how many rules/regulations are put in place there will be loopholes and a terrorist organization WILL find them. America is full of people who only know the “American Life” and have no clue to what is going on outside It’s borders (other than what the media want’s them to know). There are many cultures out there that would kill every American just because they don’t live the same culture. They don’t “love” and “care” like the American culture. There is no “talking them out of it” just like they can’t “talk you into it”. It’s OK to be paranoid. Just don’t be stupid about it. I’m not writing to offend. Just to shed a little reality. I only posted to the first post I saw.

        Reply
        • Johnathane Dorane

           /  September 16, 2011

          “Wrong place wrong time with suspicious people sitting next to you.”

          Suffering from air sickness is susspicious behavior?
          What is the acceptable time limit for going to the lavatory of an airplane?
          Please clarify what the suspicious behavior was.

          Reply
      • Peter R

         /  September 13, 2011

        Thanks to Shoshana and all the comments for revealing this appalling incident. I wonder what the stories of the other “50 incidents” are. In this case, it is frightening that the suspicions/paranoia of some unidentified person could trigger such abuse of innocent people–and that some would say, well, that’s just post-9/11 life for you. Why is it that “law enforecement personnel had to be so rough and rude with no evidence other than the unknown “accusor’s” accusation? I feel humiliated and ashamed by their behavior, and I apologize to Shoshana and all others so treated for being part of citizenry that has allowed such things to happen.

        Reply
        • Naren

           /  September 14, 2011

          I was wondering the exact same thing. I want to know more about those “50 incidents”. what exactly was reported as ‘suspicious’ (just brown folks sitting next to each other?! and nothing else?) and how were they handled.
          Oh wait, we probably won’t hear about them.

          Reply
        • Joe Jericho

           /  September 14, 2011

          I agree and makes you wonder whether there should be a cause of action against either the reporter or, more likely, the government. I think it should be targeted to the government. Reporters should be encouraged to report, generally speaking. It all came down to how the government handled it. Let’s be honest, this is all politically driven. No political party wants to preside over the next attack, so they have no problem brutalizing an “unimportant” citizen for the sake of saving their own necks. We need term limits for all, and you are only allowed to hold one public office during the course of your lifetime. Sort of like a “thank you for your public service, goodbye” sort of thing.

          Reply
      • B.R.

         /  September 13, 2011

        When should people get suspicious and react.? When there’s a gun to their head? Or better yet, when the plane is going down? Grow up!

        Reply
        • Johnathane Dorane

           /  September 16, 2011

          You can get suspicious whenever you want, but you can not interfere with the rights of your fellow citizen without probable cause supported by oath or afirmation.

          Do you walk down the sidewalk keeping an eye on everyone and your distance because they may have a gun that they are planning to put to your head?

          Do you time peoples bathroom breaks when you are eating out?

          Do you time your co-workers bathroom breaks?

          Do you time your family members bathroom breaks?

          Please explain to me how their behavior warrented this level of a reaction. It would have been possible to seperate the three individuals and ask them questions for a few minutes to determine that they were not a threat. There was never and still is no evidence that these three people represented a threat to anyone.

          Reply
      • No the sad truth is white people are scared of what doesn’t look like them. this has been and will always be true sorry. I’m not trying to be insensitve or disrespectful. They use the attack to justify their treatment of people who don’t look like them. it’s been a pattern throughout the history of america. I was once stopped by the police becausde they said they recieved a call that Ii was walking supiciously by a bank. I was on the side walk and it was cold outside so i had on a big jacket. I was coming home from a ballet rehersal i was being “real suspicious” I’m sorry this happened to you I’m sorry this happens to anyone. our problem is not terrorism it’s fear and ignorance and untill we confess and accept that we wont began to address what can be done to keep from reacting out of fear

        Reply
      • I am so sorry this happened to you. And glad you are willing to share the story. Too much of our daily lives are controlled by fear since 2001. We should be ashamed of a great many things which have occurred in the last 10 years. And Dallas is correct. In many ways, the terrorists did win.

        Reply
      • Anita

         /  September 14, 2011

        I echo your words, Dallas and I, too, am appalled and ashamed by your treatment.

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      • GOPAL IYER

         /  September 14, 2011

        What if the “Government” was perpetrating this terror? Isn’t that possible? There’s enough motive… “Power”.

        Reply
      • Sadly so true Dallas. It almost seems like we are in an Orwellian 1984 environment when you hear stuff like this!

        So sorry you had to go through this! No American Citizen should ever have to go through that!

        Reply
      • i couldnt have said it better myself!!
        you are totally right,we need to stop sending our troops over there to be murdered and start focusing on our own country who has suffered tremendously due to the fact that we are making their country better. we need to fix us so we can help others. 10yrs have been long enough.
        Shoshana-im sorry you and the other two men had to go through this,but maybe something good will come of it!! take care and stay proud of America(even through the unAmerican instances). “what does not kill us,makes us stronger”

        Reply
      • Joe Milwarde

         /  September 14, 2011

        Yes, the terrorists did win that day, and they are still winning, and they have nothing to do with the Middle East. All physical evidence at the World Trade Center points to controlled demolition as the cause of the collapse of 3 high rise buildings on 9-11-2001, and almost all physical evidence was ignored by the so called government investigations. Starting from that scientifically irrefutable conclusion, one needs now to ask, “Who were the terrorists?” Things will continue to degenerate until the events of a decade ago are investigated instead of covered up.

        Reply
      • Pete

         /  September 15, 2011

        Our ‘gift’ from Osama Bin Laden. Now you see what the real price is for his murdering acts on 9/11: to make the U.S. an unwelcome place for all those people who chose freedom instead of sharia law, liberty instead of religious tyranny.

        Reply
      • joeld

         /  September 15, 2011

        you mean our own government won that day

        Reply
      • Libby

         /  September 18, 2011

        Actually their goal was to draw the USA into wars thus bankrupting it.

        They certainly have succeeded.

        Reply
    • Shoshana – I am really appauled at your response to the people who imprisoned you, and your lack of knowledge about your rights. The best way we can all fight this, is to simply decline to converse. Tell them that you will not speak to them. If, on the first request they do not conduct you to the toilet, urinate in their cell.
      Be polite, and refuse, respectfully, to converse. The only way they can proceed is with your cooperation, unless you have really done something wrong and there is evidence. Don’t EVER willingly talk to a TSA or FBI agent. Just remain silent. There is no law which requires you to speak. Without any blame or accusation at you, this is the only way we will regain our rights – not cooperating with those who exceed their authority.
      Respectfully,
      Charles Heller

      Reply
      • Moose

         /  September 12, 2011

        Stand up to the authorities, says a white man.

        Reply
        • I find this the saddest part of the acccount…a person who feels she is being racially profiled… speaking hatefully about “rednecks”, country music, and speed boats….the descriptions of the white bald paunchy officers (find it hard to believe that in Detroit there was only 1 officer of color)… and then other people of color jump on board to slam “whitey”. Yes, the terrorists have done a good job of dividing Americans and apparently the profiling goes both ways. Every civil rights movement has included millions of compassionate white Americans and as such a person I am offended.

          Reply
          • Diane

             /  September 13, 2011

            I agree with you K.S. Schultz!!! She talked about them singling her out because of her color, but she was to quick to talk about hating southern people, their music, and the way THEY LOOK, WTF!!!!

            Reply
            • Crys

               /  September 13, 2011

              give some grace-we are all reactionary, and her situation was both extreme and humiliating. Frankly, I am lily white and I would hate on white people doing that to me!

              Reply
            • Are you fucking kidding? She explained that she was so humiliated and angry that she began to feel that way (irrationally, because she was scared and ANGRY). You sound like one of the people who probably would have found her “suspicious.”

              Reply
              • Yodamite

                 /  September 13, 2011

                @X:
                I agree. The thing that baffles me is that, with everything this poor woman was put through, K.S. Schultz and Diane are most troubled by Shoshana’s silent reaction. As if getting handcuffed, strip-searched, and getting interrogated is a walk in the park.

                Reply
              • Chris

                 /  September 13, 2011

                and you sound like one of those people who wines all the time and complains about how you dont have anything so you sit at home and wait on OBAMA to pull his magical bag of money out from under his ass.

                Reply
                • Yodamite

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  Actually he doesn’t sound like that at all. Sounds like you misread his post. May I suggest you make the eye holes a little bigger in that hood of yours. That would make reading a little easier.

                  Reply
            • Allison

               /  September 13, 2011

              I love watching privileged white people lose their minds when someone who’s had their Constitutional rights violated uses an insult toward those doing the violating. It is truly irony in action.

              Reply
              • Matt

                 /  September 13, 2011

                In your opinion, are all whit people “privileged”? Also can you tell me which of her Constitutional rights were violated?

                Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  The Constitutional rights against unreasonable search and seizure, and the right to face her accuser.

                  And yes, in America, all white people have white privilege. Since other people in this comment thread have misunderstood that concept, here is a good website about what it is (it might not be what you think I mean): http://www.mtholyoke.edu/org/wsar/intro.htm

                  Reply
                  • Linda

                     /  September 13, 2011

                    Wow. That was an eye-opener. 100% true.

                    Reply
                  • @allison
                    i would so disagree. im as white as they come and i live in Texas and i cant get a job even at burger king because every spanish speaking immigrant gets it. even though i could understand and perform any job just the same if not better. SO EXCUSE ME,WHERE ARE MY “WHITE PRIVILEGES”????? dont get me wrong,im not racist. but this is America and its the born and bred Americans that DO NOT get “privileges”

                    Reply
            • Markus

               /  September 13, 2011

              Right, because white people always get pulled off airlines and detained because they look a little bit like that McVeigh fella.

              She was sitting in a jail cell at the time she wrote this, for no other reason than someone thought that by simply sitting in her seat during the entire flight, she was up to something, detained by a largely white collection of “authorities” from several branches of law enforcement and government, acting on laws passed by that government, put in place by a president whose largest demographic of voting supporters was white Southern voters.

              So, try to understand why someone going through a cavity search while her husband has no idea where she is, might be a bit resentful of the type of person who supported the President who passed the laws that allowed this travesty to happen to an American citizen.

              You think her noticing the color of the officers’ skin is racist? OK, fair enough. Let’s put you and your family on a boat, ship you across the ocean, and force you to work as manual labor for a few generations for a black population. They we’ll free your people for the express purpose of fighting and dying in your owners’ wars, so they can go on to be treated as a fraction of the worth of a black person, while being denied access to decent work, pay, civil rights, or education for another few generations. Then we’ll haul one of your descendants off an airliner one day thanks to a law passed by a black President, enforced by black police officers, because someone thinks they look a little too much like that white guy who did that terrible thing a decade earlier, and we’ll see if your great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandson doesn’t notice the color of the man checking his colon for a bomb.

              Then we can come back here and finish this discussion about what counts as racist in this country today.

              Reply
            • Asma Khan

               /  September 13, 2011

              how about I handcuff/strip search both of you (for looking what you look like) and see much you like me.

              Reply
            • Using profanity-abbreviated or blatant-doesn’t give credence to an opinion just as it fails to weaken the one that is opposed!

              Reply
          • Xanthoptica

             /  September 13, 2011

            In basketball, you make a point to “call the first foul.” It’s hardly surprising that a person of color who had clearly been detained for flying without being white might notice the racial or ethnic traits of the folks who are bragging about their overtime while her dignity is flushed down the toilet. She didn’t introduce race or ethnicity into the situation…but simply reacted to bald and mean-spirited racism.

            Reply
            • rohlik

               /  September 13, 2011

              i disagree she absouletly is clearly a racists, with her comments, she is a disgrace, support our country and policies if you hate them that much leave.

              Reply
              • Rachel

                 /  September 13, 2011

                I would absolutely love to leave. Unfortunately, though, it’s a pain in the butt to move to another country, especially when I can’t even find a job in the US with a bachelors degree (you need to have enough money to support yourself, or get a work visa which is sometimes pretty hard to do).

                Also, I will not support policies blindly just because they are “our policies”. Sometimes they’re pretty stupid policies. Isn’t that what the founding fathers wanted in the first place anyway? For freedom of speech and the right to disagree with the way the country is run?

                Reply
              • Allison

                 /  September 13, 2011

                Nope. Americans have the right to complain about America. That’s actually a pretty important ideal that was a part of our founding belief system.

                Reply
              • zirjo

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Rohlik..she decided at that moment she would hate anything to do with Country music, and whatever comes along with it.
                In other words she hated the idea that white men was doing this to her.
                You know when someone refers as to rednecks that reminds me of ignorance. Not race and this is what she meant. by using this words.
                As in many societies there is lacks of education and and most of all competence on what you do in this case is security the people taken this kind of jobs and you see it in every port the woman about 70 years old with no bladder only a bag on her side to hold her pee…but she must be searched because this is security or otherwise (I could loose my job excuse) Personnel taking this position are not the smart security force, you can think of them as untrained and not too smart but they could beat you if you resist, they do not know anything about privacy acts whatsoever very ignorant people that do things as if it was only one color in front of their eyes. I’ll tell you sometimes i had travel i noticed this people are so stupid on their search you can stand there and see their mistakes and think how many people could go trough this isles and find dozens of ways someone could take illegal instruments into an airliner. Their job is completely unnecessary if there is another attack for sure will not be coming in an airliner any way. I appreciate authorities took a step towards security but this is done absolutely wrong. I hope that some day
                they can restore our liberties and stop scaring people throughout the whole USA. The so called (patriots) that call on these 3 are the 1st ignorant s.. the ones to follow are even more stupid..till the bosses arrived FBI and others….

                Reply
              • Chucky

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Rohlik,
                The point of a democracy is that if you hate the policies you are supposed to complain and work to change them. You are not supposed to just take it–or leave, you are supposed to fix it. The government makes lots of mistakes, every day, some are badly written laws or policies, some are based on misinterpretation of the law, some are out of control bureaucrats. In this case, as noted above, someone was detained AFTER being cleared to get on the plane by security, being Xrayed, magnetometered etc, and after the flight was over. This is bad policy, and it is an unreasonable search in custody without according rights required by the Constitution. If you think this is RIGHT, work to change the constitution, otherwise it is not legally justified, and it violates, rather than protecting Freedom.

                Reply
              • Torus

                 /  September 15, 2011

                So you’re saying that we should blindly support everything the government does, never questioning whether or not it could do more harm than good or that it’s just an outright terrible policy?

                Reply
              • Sarah S

                 /  September 15, 2011

                I love it when illiterates with foreign names (from countries with Communist pasts) come and tell us Americans we should all leave the US if we insist on knowing our Constitutional rights- and complaining when they are violated…

                Reply
          • Completely agree with what you find to be the saddest part of this account. Understandably, she is upset by what happened to her, but she is really no different with her descriptions of the officers she interacted with. Would have been a much more powerful post if she, herself, could have risen above the very thing she is blogging against.

            Reply
            • Ian

               /  September 13, 2011

              Yup, she is really no different. That’s why she handcuffed and strip-searched them, and detained them with no justification or explanation for hours.

              Oh.

              Wait.

              No she didn’t.

              Maybe there ARE differences between the people who violated her rights — and, by extension, YOUR rights and mine, too, because rights are rights — and the victim here. You think, maybe?

              Reply
            • Steve Bock

               /  September 13, 2011

              What are you 12? You can’t see the difference between being arrested and strip-searched and noting that her captors were fat rednecks?

              BTW, I am white, male and born in Georgia. I’m even a little bit fat.

              Reply
            • zirjo

               /  September 14, 2011

              KB..she decided at that moment she would hate anything to do with Country music, and whatever comes along with it.
              In other words she hated the idea that white men was doing this to her.
              You know when someone refers as to rednecks that reminds me of ignorance. Not race and this is what she meant. by using this words.
              As in many societies there is lacks of education and and most of all competence on what you do in this case is security the people taken this kind of jobs and you see it in every port the woman about 70 years old with no bladder only a bag on her side to hold her pee…but she must be searched because this is security or otherwise (I could loose my job excuse) Personnel taking this position are not the smart security force, you can think of them as untrained and not too smart but they could beat you if you resist, they do not know anything about privacy acts whatsoever very ignorant people that do things as if it was only one color in front of their eyes. I’ll tell you sometimes i had travel i noticed this people are so stupid on their search you can stand there and see their mistakes and think how many people could go trough this isles and find dozens of ways someone could take illegal instruments into an airliner. Their job is completely unnecessary if there is another attack for sure will not be coming in an airliner any way. I appreciate authorities took a step towards security but this is done absolutely wrong. I hope that some day
              they can restore our liberties and stop scaring people throughout the whole USA. The so called (patriots) that call on these 3 are the 1st ignorant s.. the ones to follow are even more stupid..till the bosses arrived FBI and others….

              Reply
          • Yeah, but isn’t this a very human response to what was happening? Hate in return for hate?

            Reply
          • Yodamite

             /  September 13, 2011

            @Schultz:

            Really? You thought her internalized emotional reaction to her oppressors was the saddest thing about her account–a reaction that she owns up to at the end of the article? That’s what you walked away with? That’s Sad!

            And, what an absurd false equivalency you try to create! Sorry, Shoshana was racially profiled–not regionally stereotyped. One leads to violation of civil rights, false arrest, and a humiliating strip search, while the other leads to some dorks on the internet laughably comparing the plight of a southern white person to that of a racially-profiled minority. No, the profiling does NOT go both ways. A “redneck” doesn’t end up in a cell because someone thinks his twang is silly or disagrees with his taste in music.

            She reacted the way she did because of the way she was treated. And, if you actually use your brain, you would see that she concludes the article with a message of tolerance that is aimed at everyone, including herself.

            Reply
            • Brilliant comment, Yodamite. I couldn’t have said it better myself.

              Reply
            • EAE

               /  September 13, 2011

              Yodamite, I completely agree with you.

              Reply
            • Matt

               /  September 13, 2011

              Excellent!!

              Reply
            • Excellent reply to such insensitivity, Yodamite.

              How would they like it if that happened them? Are they trying to say they wouldn’t internally get frustrated with what was going on? Even if they would later reflect on that frustration differently?

              Reply
          • John

             /  September 13, 2011

            I was also left feeling offended after reading this blog. I am not only white, but also a southerner.

            I am sure you were detained and questioned, but it is obvious by the blatant lies in your post that you are exagerating the situation in an attempt to make the white man look bad.

            Shame on you.

            Reply
            • Guster

               /  September 13, 2011

              Southern, white, and a delicate flower, too! A very common combination.

              Being detained, and strip-searched, and handcuffed–completely baselessly–is bad. But hurting my fee-fees is worse. Shame on Shoshana, indeed! I think the lesson she should take from this is that white men have her best interests at heart.

              We really do, Shoshana. Now remove all your clothes.

              Reply
            • Allison

               /  September 13, 2011

              More white privilege.

              It is white privilege to be able to read an account of someone’s Constitutional rights being violated, and that person having an angry reaction toward the violators (which she owns up to), and dismiss the account because white feelings might possibly have gotten hurt.

              Reply
              • Finisterre

                 /  September 13, 2011

                Well said, Allison. These ‘I am offended’ comments are unbelievable. Particularly the one that ends ‘I am a compassionate person’. You’re really not, dude.

                Reply
              • Wow, Allison. Such a racist chip on your shoulder. Perhaps you should direct your complaints to the African-American president who endorses these violations. Those white Southern rednecks at DHS could do none of this without his authorization. And by the way, didn’t she mention she was strip-searched by an African-American? Hmm. It seems to me like this issue is not so black and white as you would like it to be. In fact, I know just as many Latinas and African-Americans who profile the Hebshis and the Indian men of this world as terrorists, just as you are incorrectly profiling me right now.

                What happened to this lady is a travesty perpetuated by a nation afraid of its own tall shadow. A nation being told by our President and Big Sis (Janet Napolitano, Director of Homeland Security) to “See Something, Say Something.” Each of us Americans of every race is losing our freedom. This injustice will not be overcome if the primary concern of racist people is to prove that people of their specific color are the most persecuted. We ALL have a horse in this race, and sensible solutions will only prevail if we pull together and stop putting each other down.

                Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  It seems that you misunderstand my use of the term “white privilege.” It’s a concept from critical race theory, and it refers to the fact that in America, simply by being white, white people have privileges that others do not have. White is seen as the norm, while non-white is seen as the non-norm, the “other,” the abnormal.

                  It is white privilege, for example, to read a story about a non-white woman whose Constitutional rights are violated in a humiliating way, and then state that because that woman said some mean things about the people who humiliated her, you’re going to dismiss her story, as the poster named “John” stated.

                  The fact that non-white and white people were involved in the violation of Ms. Shebshi’s rights is not relevant to the concept of white privilege, nor is the implementation of the Patriot Act, or any of the other issues you mentioned. My mention of white privilege was specifically relevant to “John’s” dismissal of Ms. Shebshi’s experience because his white feelings were hurt.

                  The Wikipedia entry on white privilege is a good place to start learning about the concept.

                  And I’m white, by the way.

                  Reply
                  • Shanna

                     /  September 13, 2011

                    Let me ask you a question…..do we white privileged people have the right to not be blown up in the air??????? Anyone?

                    Since we are all so concerned with rights

                    Reply
                    • pete.d

                       /  September 13, 2011

                      Sure. Of course we do. So, if and when there’s an actual threat in which there’s some clear evidence of wrong-doing, genuinely suspicious behavior that could lead to a plane getting blown up, by all means law enforcement should take that seriously.

                      But in this case? None of that was present. Some facts:

                      • None of the behaviors of the people arrested was actually genuinely suspicious
                      • It is not even plausible that any of the people arrested could have had the capability to blow up the plane. None of the people arrested so far for attempting to do so even came close to having a working plan that would have led to that result
                      • The plane was not even in the air, nor preparing to be in the air. That ship had sailed, and every passenger on the plane was assured of their “right to not be blown up in the air”, no matter what law enforcement did to the suspects

                      So next time you invoke your rights, please take the time to be sure they are relevant to the context.

                    • Allison

                       /  September 13, 2011

                      Explain why non-whites don’t have Constitutional rights when white people get nervous.

                  • Chris

                     /  September 13, 2011

                    yea lets use wikipedia for a backup because its soo reliable right? and you racial idiots who say that white people have priviliges and as soon as you get approached about it you say that you were being “misunderstood”. i dont care if your black white orange green or freakin pink. jump off this subject about profiling and feeling so “violated”. its gettin real old!

                    Reply
                    • Allison

                       /  September 13, 2011

                      Ms. Shebshi was identified based on her race. Her Constitutional rights were violated not because of her behavior, but because of her race.

                      I identified the Wiki link as a starting point, but there are other academic websites available to explain the concept of white privilege:

                      http://www.mtholyoke.edu/org/wsar/intro.htm
                      http://academic.udayton.edu/race/01race/whiteness05.htm
                      http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~rjensen/freelance/whiteprivilege.htm

                      It would help if you understood a concept before you dismissed it.

                    • Marnie

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Chris, you are not making a good point about anything when you say, “you racial idiots who say that white people have privileges…”

                      Anyone who cannot identify with a strong feeling of violation by hearing that someone was wrongly accused, strip searched, and interrogated has lost not only any sense of what it means to be American (if they ever had that,) but is a cold and hardened human being (if they still are considered ‘human’.)

                      Why don’t we take your mom and dad, handcuff them, throw them in a dirty cell with no explanation, ability to use the restroom, or allowance to call you and explain why they never showed up at home after their plane landed, strip them, cavity search them, interrogate them, and then send them on their merry way after 4 hours – and then tell me there was no violation.

                      And, if you cannot acknowledge that there is still an advantage to being white in our society – especially in this era – then, you are obviously just being stupid on purpose, whether or not you’re actually aware of your ignorance.

                      Furthermore, if you’re so sure that Wikipedia is completely unreliable, then why don’t you provide references to your own credible resources, versus just shutting down hers?

                      For such a moving, disturbing, and beautifully raw post, written by an honest, feeling person about their own tragic experience, the discussion seems to be rife with unfeeling, defensive, ignorant, and imperious commentary.

                      This is about a person, and all of our rights as Americans, to be free from subjection to violation – regardless of the situation, and especially without due process. It was never about protecting a plane full of innocent people; they were never in danger. (Besides being protected when everyone was screened before boarding, this happened after there was no more question of their possible potential impending danger.)

                      Whether you agree with the comparison to the climate in pre-WWII Germany, this quote by Martin Niemöller certainly rings true here:
                      “First they came for the communists,
                      and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a communist.
                      Then they came for the trade unionists,
                      and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a trade unionist.
                      Then they came for the Jews,
                      and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a Jew.
                      Then they came for me
                      and there was no one left to speak out for me.”

                      If there aren’t protections for all Americans against this kind of abuse of power (from wherever it stems, or is allowed,) then soon none of us will be protected from frivolous encroachments on our rights – for any reason, or none at all. The only entity which can protect our rights is us – united together.

                      If you can’t see this much, then you have no morally or intellectually valid leg to stand on in this discussion.

                  • Linda

                     /  September 13, 2011

                    Good comeback Allison – and by the way Miss Piper Bayard – the whole Homeland Security S–t started during your ex- BUSH administration – how soon have you forgotten this??????

                    Reply
                    • Lol. Linda, first of all, you should not be so quick to assume I am a Republican. Second, Obama could have obliterated it in an instant. Instead, he has chosen to expand it’s powers.

                  • What To Do?

                     /  September 13, 2011

                    Allison – I’m going to chime ine on the white/black piece. Would you let me know the ratio of black to white pro football players and pro basketball players. Please don’t say white’s have extra privileges…if anything, the pendulum has swung back the other way. Agree with you Piper.

                    Reply
                    • Allison

                       /  September 13, 2011

                      Another indication that the theory is not understood. White privilege is irrelevant to your examples.

                  • I see you read a lot of books, Allison. Good for you. However, this is not an issue of “white privilege” by any definition. White German-Americans were treated much worse than this during WWI and WWII. That’s because we were at war with them. Now, we are at war with Islamic extremists who come primarily from the Middle East. If tall, blonde Swedish people were attacking us, they would be profiled, beaten, and treated unfairly just as the German-Americans were. I’m not saying it’s right. I’m saying that’s the bottom line.

                    Reply
                    • I should have been more specific. We were not at war with German-Americans. We were at war with Germany.

                    • Allison

                       /  September 13, 2011

                      Ah, thank you for making it clear that you don’t understand the theory. That saves me a lot of time. I appreciate it.

                    • bridgett

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      If they come from the Middle East, then why has the US been in ASIA for the past 10 years. Both Afghanistan and Pakistan are Asian countries.

                    • Bridgett, I’m referring to the 9/11 bombers, who were all from the Middle East. There’s enough literature out there to educate you about Al-Qaeda that I shouldn’t have to explain why we are hunting down Middle Eastern terrorists in Asia. Just google it.

                    • I support Rationality

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Wow, Piper, misinformation. Obama did not expand the powers of the Patriot Act. A little fact-checking is a good thing.

                    • Sarah S

                       /  September 15, 2011

                      I see you don’t read a lot of history, Piper. During WWII we were at war with both the Germans and the Japanese. Guess which Americans of those two ethnic backgrounds got carted off to camps, had all their property stolen and after the war were denied for decades any legal redress of their wrongs? (Hint: it wasn’t the white-skinned ones.) Guess which of those two ethnic groups perpetrated actual acts of sabotage against the US government, the fear of which formed the justification for the internment? (Hint: it wasn’t the brown-skinned ones.)

                      By the way, I’m white, grew up partly in the South and my ancestors were among the first settlers of Georgia. And it’s not the bottom line. The bottom line, if you’re American, is the truths we “hold to be self-evident”. Among those truths is NOT “run scared and trample on the Constitutional rights of anyone who looks different than you the minute you feel threatened.”

                    • fonsmoonen

                       /  September 16, 2011

                      Yeah yeah, After 66 year ´we`still pay the price for that bubble gum freedom. Stay where you are ! the next time.

                  • Gump

                     /  September 13, 2011

                    Whatever, I was a white kid who grew up in a mexican neighborhood. In my school, white people were the minority. There was no privilege being white in that situation. So sick of hearing that. If you’re singled out as being a gang member because you dress like a gang member, who’s fault is that?

                    Reply
                    • Gump

                       /  September 13, 2011

                      See? and the price I paid for growing up in that neighborhood? Bad grammar.

                    • Allison

                       /  September 13, 2011

                      Thanks for making it clear that you don’t understand the theory. That saves me a lot of time. I appreciate it.

                  • Lol. I understand the theory just fine, Allison. I am saying it does not apply in this context. You know, I think the China has the perfect job for you. Ever heard of the Fifty Centers? :)

                    Reply
                    • Allison

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Oh, wow, an oldie but a goodie – calling someone with whom you disagree a Communist! I haven’t seen that one in a long time. Thanks for the memories – I had forgotten the “Red Scare” gambit.

                    • Allison, google Fifty Centers. I’m not calling you a communist. Obama even has one in the form of Jesse C. Lee on Twitter. Just look it up.

                    • Allison

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Silly me. When you said China has a perfect job for me, I assumed you invoked China rather than Obama for a reason. But I can understand how you’d mistype “China” instead of “Obama” – those keys are so close to each other on the keyboard!

                      If you weren’t calling me a Communist, you wouldn’t have mentioned China.

                • Jane

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  But nobody DID see anything. Your point is invalid. This woman (and her seatmates) did nothing suspicious.

                  Reply
                • Alice

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  With all due respect, Piper, these policies were put in place ten years ago; not by our current president.

                  Reply
                  • With all due respect, Allison, Obama could have changed those policies the moment he got into office if he wanted to. Instead, he has done everything he can to expand on those power-grabbing policies, i.e. the “enhanced patdowns” that he specifically advocates. Take a look at the progression of the federal regulations and the executive interpretations on the issues. This is not a case of “Democrat good, Republican bad.”

                    Reply
                    • Allison

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      I’m sorry, I don’t see where I made any mention of Democrats or Republicans. Could you point that out to me?

                    • Oops. I meant that last comment for Alice, not Allison.

                • Gump

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  BOOYAH!

                  Reply
                • No. Racism = POWER *PLUS* prejudice.

                  Sit your ass down.

                  Reply
              • Chris

                 /  September 13, 2011

                shut the hell up. the same old white people are bad and others are good. what you idiots dont know is that you get on here and talk about how profiling is wrong and stereotyping is wrong but yet you say as much bad as you can and call white people rednecks and say that white people have priviliges. thats stereotyping right there wow how stupid can allison, yodamite, and X, and steve bock get?

                Reply
                • Allison

                   /  September 13, 2011

                  Unfortunately, it seems that you also don’t understand the concept of white privilege. Here’s a good place to start: http://www.mtholyoke.edu/org/wsar/intro.htm

                  Nothing in this comment thread, or in the concept of white privilege, states that whites are bad and others are good. We are talking about racial profiling that results in the violation of someone’s Constitutional rights.

                  Ms. Shepshi already admitted, in her original blog post, that her responses to the events were exactly what she was experiencing, and owned up to that. Again, I am amused that whites who read the post seem to focus ONLY on her gut-level reaction to being handcuffed, detained, strip and cavity searched, and interrogated, and not the actual events of her being handcuffed, detained, strip and cavity searched, and interrofated.

                  Reply
                  • Anna

                     /  September 14, 2011

                    Allison — What happened on that plane is atroicious. But when you can prove to me that all white people enjoy those same rights then maybe I will believe in your theory. As of now, I can’t because it doesn’t take into account that people have individual stories and histories. That is one racist theory and you being a white person who believes it doesn’t make it any less racist.

                    Reply
                    • Allison

                       /  September 14, 2011

                      Please explain how the fact that white people, in general and as a group, have certain privileges (an assumption of normality, for example, or a decreased likelihood to be racially profiled, for another) is racist rather than descriptive.

                    • Yodamite

                       /  September 15, 2011

                      White privilege has already been demonstrated here multiple times–not just including the events Mrs. Hebshi recalled. In this comment section, people have repeatedly disregarded the greater injustice inflicted on Mrs. Hebshi in favor of the minor insult directed at the white officers. They see that minor offense as the equivalent or worse than the hardship Mrs. Hebshi faced. They have blamed Mrs. Hebshi herself for her arrest, and have attempted to defend racial profiling. (They have the advantage of promoting racial profiling, knowing full well that it will never impact themselves.) They see racial discussion as an imposition on their lives and they seek to shut it down.

                      White privilege is not just a set of advantages that white people possess, but it is also the delusion that racial inequality does not exist and that people of color are at fault for not achieving the advantages that they have. This delusion also allows them the initiative to control the discourse on racial relations.

                      How often do we hear people like Chris pop up on sites like these and, in monosyllabic fashion, attack anyone who dares discuss racism? His state of mind is the very definition of white privilege.

                • Yodamite

                   /  September 15, 2011

                  Chris is the perfect example of the Dunning-Kruger Effect in action.

                  Reply
            • Rollie Fingers

               /  September 13, 2011

              You poor thing! Are you all right?

              Reply
            • Michelle

               /  September 13, 2011

              How about you not think about yourself for one moment out of your entire white-male life? You have no clue whatsoever to knowing what it is like to being a minority, to have some white person point a finger at you for nothing more than being brown or different and get hauled off by cops. Your white privilege is showing. You will never be strip searched and humiliated in front of a 50+ people with no reasoning given, purely because you don’t look like an “Real American.”

              Your “hurt feelings” are the last thing that this is supposed to be about. Shame on you!

              Reply
            • @John It must be so hard being an oppressed white man. We all really REALLY feel for you.

              Shame on you for being an unabashed idiot.

              Reply
            • Ahsan

               /  September 13, 2011

              Dear John-
              You’re right. Southern white men have never done anything evil.
              Love, former slaves, victims of Jim Crow laws, Native Americans, Latinos, women, Asians, and the rest of this increasingly “colored” country.
              “People” like you believe every lie that you suck from Glenn Beck and Sean Hannity’s teats. Yet you accuse this account for “blatant lies”? Based on what? Grow up and realize that the world is a much more nuanced and complex place than your provincial world outlook (which is so typical of some Southerners).
              And on behalf of the rest of us Americans, we’re ALL offended by you and your brothers in redneckery.

              Reply
            • Daisymae

               /  September 13, 2011

              To John (cc: KS Schultz and Diane)

              I too am a white Southerner (very proud of it) and I am ASHAMED of YOU and your Hideous, hateful remarks. It’s people like you who cause the rest of the country to believe such awful stereotypes of Southerners.

              I am appalled, shocked, and horrified at what happened to Shoshanna and these two gentlemen–innocent people just minding their own business. This hideous abuse of innocent Americans by our out of control government has to STOP!

              Real Americans–real patriots–will do everything in their power to oppose this abuse of our citizens. That includes morally upright Southerners.

              Reply
            • Hitobito

               /  September 13, 2011

              John,
              You are not only white and a southerner, you are ignorant. You wouldn’t be able to recognize a “blatant lie” if it landed on your pecker. She doesn’t have to “make the white man look bad”…they do quite a good job of doing it themselves. So, STFU.

              Reply
            • A woman’s rights were violated, and all you can think about is that she didn’t bow and scrape low enough to the white man.

              Reply
            • George

               /  September 13, 2011

              John, just because you don’t believe it happened as described doesn’t mean it didn’t happen exactly as she said it did, and if you take a derogatory comment as a reason to become all upset and offended, try for a second imagining you were in her place, and this happened to you.

              Don’t you have a shred of compassion for a fellow person and an American citizen who was treated this way? What about her RIGHTS?

              Can you imagine that you are in a place where there are mostly asian people, and you were taken off a plane, strip searched, and not told of what you were being held for. If you told your story of what happened, and made a comment on the way the person was making cracks about how they were going to make more overtime because you were being held, and how, for them, the tragedy of 9/11 was a great thing… more $$$.

              Before you get all upset, please imagine you being in that place. I am a white person, and have been in places where I was treated very different that someone who was from the area (mostly jamaican and spanish people in this case), and it was pretty easy to get angry that they were treating me like this in my own country, and it would be very easy to comment on the way they looked, or their funny accents, or hair, or…

              Have people lost the ability to be compassionate to our fellow human beings, to see differences in ethnicity as a bad thing rather than an enriching thing to our communities, have we become the same as the people who caused and committed the attacks, and are we turning on each other now?

              I believe that Osama Bin Ladin achieved what he wanted in the end: and bankrupt country, in both a financial and spiritual way. It’s comments like yours that confirm this hypothesis.

              Reply
            • Are you for real John?

              Reply
            • zirjo

               /  September 14, 2011

              JOHN..she decided at that moment she would hate anything to do with Country music, and whatever comes along with it.
              In other words she hated the idea that white men was doing this to her.
              You know when someone refers as to rednecks that reminds me of ignorance. Not race and this is what she meant. by using this words.
              As in many societies there is lacks of education and and most of all competence on what you do in this case is security the people taken this kind of jobs and you see it in every port the woman about 70 years old with no bladder only a bag on her side to hold her pee…but she must be searched because this is security or otherwise (I could loose my job excuse) Personnel taking this position are not the smart security force, you can think of them as untrained and not too smart but they could beat you if you resist, they do not know anything about privacy acts whatsoever very ignorant people that do things as if it was only one color in front of their eyes. I’ll tell you sometimes i had travel i noticed this people are so stupid on their search you can stand there and see their mistakes and think how many people could go trough this isles and find dozens of ways someone could take illegal instruments into an airliner. Their job is completely unnecessary if there is another attack for sure will not be coming in an airliner any way. I appreciate authorities took a step towards security but this is done absolutely wrong. I hope that some day
              they can restore our liberties and stop scaring people throughout the whole USA. The so called (patriots) that call on these 3 are the 1st ignorant s.. the ones to follow are even more stupid..till the bosses arrived FBI and others….

              Reply
            • Jess

               /  September 14, 2011

              John is clearly trolling here, isn’t he? You don’t have to reply to ALL the idiots, Allison.

              Reply
              • Allison

                 /  September 14, 2011

                I have a tendency to feel that it’s only polite to respond. I will try to remember your wise suggestion :)

                Reply
          • Yes, because in Detroit they make it a point to hire all officers of color seeing as it is a predominantly Black city… right.

            The Detroit Metro airport is located in Romulus, MI. The officers in this account were not local police officers. They are employed by the goverment. I have been to Detroit Metro airport many times & yes the majority of the officers & TSA agents are White. In fact, every airport I have flown to the officers are predominantly White. Whites are the majority in this country. How is it odd that she only dealt with one officer of color?

            And if you are truly a compassionate White person so concerned with the civil rights struggles of other ethnic groups, why would you be offended by her reaction? How would you react if you had been racially profiled? I’m sure you would have been completely logical & not thought anything ill of any of the people who were mistreating you right? And then to bring the term “whitey” into this… I have to wonder where your motivation is when you are so “compassionate” and sympathetic to others causes? We should be sympathetic to one another when we are mistreated. Do you want a pat on the back for being a half decent person?

            Reply
            • FYI, whites are NOT the majority in this country. Browns and Blacks and Asians (non-white by most definitions) are the majority. I for one hope that the non-white population of this country treats the white population better than we have treated them throughout the history of our country. Right now we whites aren’t doing such a great job with that.

              Ben Franklin said it best: “Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” With our current policies on “preventing terrorism”, we have given up basic liberties guaranteed to us by the Bill of Rights and the Constitution as Allison pointed out. There is absolutely no evidence that treating our own citizens, whatever they look like, as if they ARE terrorists has PREVENTED even one single act of actual terrorism.

              The kind of profiling that needs to be done does not depend on the color of a person’s skin or even whether they have a “foreign” accent. It depends on behavioral characteristics, as practiced for years by Israeli airport security. This should have been put into place in the beginning instead of all the expensive, extremely annoying, and mostly worthless things that have been done over the last 10 years.

              Imagine that…our elected (non)representatives wasting our tax dollars.

              Reply
            • jamie

               /  September 13, 2011

              Whites are no longer the majority of this country. I am lily white, country music listener, and cold beer in a coozie drinker yet I am not considered a red neck. I have been profiled not because of race but because of hair color. I am a blonde and a very smart blonde at that. I am an accounting major with a 4.0 gpa but people don’t know that all they see is a blonde ditz. Profiling happens with everyone white, black, asian, middle eastern no matter what our race is. With that being said it went to far in this poor womans story it should have gone down a different way as another poster said earlier whomever called this in should have been questioned further before anyone acted on this and also I would like to know if this was all acted upon by one “nervous” individual.

              Reply
              • zirjo

                 /  September 14, 2011

                Jamie I’m so glad you have a comment ..she decided at that moment she would hate anything to do with Country music, and whatever comes along with it.
                In other words she hated the idea that white men was doing this to her.
                You know when someone refers as to rednecks that reminds me of ignorance. Not race and this is what she meant. by using this words.
                As in many societies there is lacks of education and and most of all competence on what you do in this case is security the people taken this kind of jobs and you see it in every port the woman about 70 years old with no bladder only a bag on her side to hold her pee…but she must be searched because this is security or otherwise (I could loose my job excuse) Personnel taking this position are not the smart security force, you can think of them as untrained and not too smart but they could beat you if you resist, they do not know anything about privacy acts whatsoever very ignorant people that do things as if it was only one color in front of their eyes. I’ll tell you sometimes i had travel i noticed this people are so stupid on their search you can stand there and see their mistakes and think how many people could go trough this isles and find dozens of ways someone could take illegal instruments into an airliner. Their job is completely unnecessary if there is another attack for sure will not be coming in an airliner any way. I appreciate authorities took a step towards security but this is done absolutely wrong. I hope that some day
                they can restore our liberties and stop scaring people throughout the whole USA. The so called (patriots) that call on these 3 are the 1st ignorant s.. the ones to follow are even more stupid..till the bosses arrived FBI and others….

                Reply
              • Torus

                 /  September 15, 2011

                How is 72.4% of the country a minority? Sorry, but no. Whites are still the majority.

                http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-02.pdf
                A little homework for ya, from the recent census.

                Reply
              • Sarah S

                 /  September 15, 2011

                Oh? You were pulled off a plane in handcuffs without explanation, had all your orifices examined by a stranger and were held while your husband and children waited anxiously with no word of what had happened to you for hours because you were BLONDE???

                I understand (and appreciate) that you DO realize that what happened to this woman was wrong- but please be careful of what premises you accept. Racial profiling does NOT mean people saying insensitive or hurtful things to you based on your personal appearance. It means having your civil rights violated based on your apparent ancestry.

                Reply
          • Michelle

             /  September 13, 2011

            you get to be angry or hurt by things every once and while = white privilege

            Being judged every day when you step outside looking different (not American enough) or when people read your name (a hard to pronounce name) off a list = something you will never ever experience.

            compassion about white people is not the point of this post. Get over it. You too Diane

            Reply
          • Ooooh the poor widdle white racist was offended!

            Reply
          • Christian Zimbabwan

             /  September 13, 2011